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Root or Not Root that's the question

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SeppGoPro

Senior Member
Sep 9, 2013
60
3
Hi together,
I am wondering which benefits I can expect from rooting my device.
One thing that comes to my mind is having an option to use face unlock for older unlock APIs.
What do you guys think?
 
Last edited:
Tirade incoming...

I'm probably in the minority, but I won't buy a phone I cannot root. The idea that the phone that I paid $1000 for up front is under the control of other companies seems wrong to me. I have full control over my computers... my ISP doesn't tell me what I can run on it and can't force me to use their DNS; Microsoft doesn't tell me that I'm breaking a EULA by running admin programs; my bank's website doesn't refuse to load because I'm running a lot of browser extensions that can modify the page. Google says they respect that people want control over their phones but they also say they respect app creator's wanting to run on an unmodified device. I throw those companies to the wind and don't look back. If only Google would stop blocking access to things and requiring us to use root to gain them back. They give and take features almost constantly and it often feels like a losing battle.

Ideology aside, there are so many small things that can be done through rooting. The next best alternative is either awkward or non-existent. I could name them off, but each thing on their own is easily dismissable is about preference. But if I had to use a phone that had none of my modifications/tweaks, I would be fairly unhappy. I don't think you'll understand the difference until you're actually changing your phone significantly as a whole then have to consider going back. A lot of things you won't know you even wanted until you find that they're possible... and a lot of things you'll look at and not even care about, despite them being popular to other people. That's what rooting is to me. Choices and options... in a world where Apple and even Google think that less is more.

I think if you're willing to experiment and put a significant amount of time in doing so, you should dive in and find out what you like. But if you're on the ropes about it, then you might not get into it.
 
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SeppGoPro

Senior Member
Sep 9, 2013
60
3
Tirade incoming...

I'm probably in the minority, but I won't buy a phone I cannot root. The idea that the phone that I paid $1000 for up front is under the control of other companies seems wrong to me. I have full control over my computers... my ISP doesn't tell me what I can run on it and can't force me to use their DNS; Microsoft doesn't tell me that I'm breaking a EULA by running admin programs; my bank's website doesn't refuse to load because I'm running a lot of browser extensions that can modify the page. Google says they respect that people want control over their phones but they also say they respect app creator's wanting to run on an unmodified device. I throw those companies to the wind and don't look back. If only Google would stop blocking access to things and requiring us to use root to gain them back. They give and take features almost constantly and it often feels like a losing battle.

Ideology aside, there are so many small things that can be done through rooting. The next best alternative is either awkward or non-existent. I could name them off, but each thing on their own is easily dismissable is about preference. But if I had to use a phone that had none of my modifications/tweaks, I would be fairly unhappy. I don't think you'll understand the difference until you're actually changing your phone significantly as a whole then have to consider going back. A lot of things you won't know you even wanted until you find that they're possible... and a lot of things you'll look at and not even care about, despite them being popular to other people. That's what rooting is to me. Choices and options... in a world where Apple and even Google think that less is more.

I think if you're willing to experiment and put a significant amount of time in doing so, you should dive in and find out what you like. But if you're on the ropes about it, then you might not get into it.

To make that clear. I rooted every android phone I owned up to now. There has been always a thing that bothered me about the stock ROM.

But this time I feel like everything is working out of the box. (Except face unlock for ing, which sux)

I get your point and you are totally right. But I'm not sure if I want to change so much and having to update on my own and other things is to much work for me.
 

MrMeeseeks

Senior Member
Jul 14, 2013
725
442
Huntsville, AL
Google Pixel 5
To make that clear. I rooted every android phone I owned up to now. There has been always a thing that bothered me about the stock ROM.

But this time I feel like everything is working out of the box. (Except face unlock for ing, which sux)

I get your point and you are totally right. But I'm not sure if I want to change so much and having to update on my own and other things is to much work for me.

I hear you. Rooting used to be fun and easy but it's more work than I want to deal with at this point.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using XDA Labs
 

SeppGoPro

Senior Member
Sep 9, 2013
60
3
It takes me longer the download the stock image to do updates with than it takes me to re-root the phone after the update. I wonder why it seems like a lot of work to you.
PS. My broadband ISP is slow....
It takes more time, which you actively have to spend. It's not like ow there is an update. Ok install done.
You have to go through all steps. You have to e.g. change settings in build.prop again. Flash kernel or what ever.
One example with rooted and problems with apps I'm always unsure if it's due to root or due to the rom. Stuff like this.
 

dave5777

Senior Member
Sep 6, 2010
1,060
535
California
ROOT! #1 reason Fingerface for fingerprint only APIs, other than that I agree the Pixel phones don't need any modifications. I hope the Pixel 5 will bring back the FP, face unlock sucks with a mask!
 

xtravbx

Senior Member
Aug 23, 2010
119
13
From what I've been reading it's going to be hard to get Google Pay to work with root. I only use root to bring back the 2 button gesture using a Magisk module. I don't know if it's worth it anymore.

I want to root so I can run ProtonVPN (or any VPN really) alongside Adguard. You can't run them side x side without root....

Admittedly a little sick of the whole big brother thing, so wouldn't mind obscuring my traffic a bit.
 

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    Tirade incoming...

    I'm probably in the minority, but I won't buy a phone I cannot root. The idea that the phone that I paid $1000 for up front is under the control of other companies seems wrong to me. I have full control over my computers... my ISP doesn't tell me what I can run on it and can't force me to use their DNS; Microsoft doesn't tell me that I'm breaking a EULA by running admin programs; my bank's website doesn't refuse to load because I'm running a lot of browser extensions that can modify the page. Google says they respect that people want control over their phones but they also say they respect app creator's wanting to run on an unmodified device. I throw those companies to the wind and don't look back. If only Google would stop blocking access to things and requiring us to use root to gain them back. They give and take features almost constantly and it often feels like a losing battle.

    Ideology aside, there are so many small things that can be done through rooting. The next best alternative is either awkward or non-existent. I could name them off, but each thing on their own is easily dismissable is about preference. But if I had to use a phone that had none of my modifications/tweaks, I would be fairly unhappy. I don't think you'll understand the difference until you're actually changing your phone significantly as a whole then have to consider going back. A lot of things you won't know you even wanted until you find that they're possible... and a lot of things you'll look at and not even care about, despite them being popular to other people. That's what rooting is to me. Choices and options... in a world where Apple and even Google think that less is more.

    I think if you're willing to experiment and put a significant amount of time in doing so, you should dive in and find out what you like. But if you're on the ropes about it, then you might not get into it.