Root via quadrooter

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santimaster2000

Senior Member
Dec 25, 2009
374
96
Buenos Aires
Do people here not understand that BlackBerry has always been about security? The whole point of the Priv, and all other BlackBerry handsets is that they can't be 'rooted', exploited or jeopardised in any way, thanks to the years of experience that they have in making secure software platforms.

Pick a non-BlackBerry phone to root, and have some respect.

No, the whole point of the Priv is having a good keyboard and Android.
 

ZeDestructor

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2011
333
59
As well as a fantastic layer of security that is extremely tough to hack. Which I'll say again, is what BlackBerry have always put first and foremost.

You can have both. That's how Secure Boot on Windows x86 works: you can disable the secure boot chain in the UEFI or, even better, enter your own keys that you sign your own binaries with. Of course, Android vendors are still refusing to accept their fate in becoming basic, boring hardware vendors (mind you, Google isn't exactly helping there), so they're locking down bootloaders and removing user control.. so we have to hack our way in instead.
 

Maiselff

Member
Nov 25, 2016
39
2
Do people here not understand that BlackBerry has always been about security? The whole point of the Priv, and all other BlackBerry handsets is that they can't be 'rooted', exploited or jeopardised in any way, thanks to the years of experience that they have in making secure software platforms.

Pick a non-BlackBerry phone to root, and have some respect.

Wut?

Bb is nom rootable, like j sm exynos bug series.

Resuming, is not rootable, because nobody gain money, and small number sell, and now Bb so non rootable, because the people rejects arbitrary things.

You cannot deny, today Bb is failed.

Enviado de meu MB886 usando Tapatalk
 

Shani Ace

Senior Member
May 2, 2006
253
17
You can have both. That's how Secure Boot on Windows x86 works: you can disable the secure boot chain in the UEFI or, even better, enter your own keys that you sign your own binaries with. Of course, Android vendors are still refusing to accept their fate in becoming basic, boring hardware vendors (mind you, Google isn't exactly helping there), so they're locking down bootloaders and removing user control.. so we have to hack our way in instead.
Well put! That's exactly the problem. And it's very user-unfriendly.
I wish there was an EU law that forbids them to do that.
 

ZeDestructor

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2011
333
59
Well put! That's exactly the problem. And it's very user-unfriendly.
I wish there was an EU law that forbids them to do that.

Inded.

And for the record, the Nexus approach is also pretty bad, because it only allows Google-signed stuff to run when enabled. Literally no way to insert your own keys :(
 
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russsland

Member
Jun 17, 2011
30
0
Do people here not understand that BlackBerry has always been about security? The whole point of the Priv, and all other BlackBerry handsets is that they can't be 'rooted', exploited or jeopardised in any way, thanks to the years of experience that they have in making secure software platforms.

Pick a non-BlackBerry phone to root, and have some respect.

was looking here for root option, but thanks to you realised "that's why I ordered this phone, to stop rooting and uninstalling/installing things to gain privacy".
you right, this phone is about privacy, not about keyboard for android users. :good:
 

Shani Ace

Senior Member
May 2, 2006
253
17
Do people here not understand that BlackBerry has always been about security? The whole point of the Priv, and all other BlackBerry handsets is that they can't be 'rooted', exploited or jeopardised in any way, thanks to the years of experience that they have in making secure software platforms.
Does Blackberry not understand that that's not what people want?
But I guess you're just joking anyway. I mean come on, Blackberry and 'experience in making secure software platforms'? Seriously? They made that into their image but the truth is Blackberry's whole concept was unsecure from the start. Why do you think it was such a huge security issue with that Obama wanted to use his Blackberry as president? Blackberry is really the opposite of secure.
Besides, not having root access over my own phone is a security risk in itself, because I can't control everything that Blackberry does with it.

No, the whole point of the Priv is having a good keyboard and Android.
Not even a good one, just any keyboard is enough. The Priv's keyboard is actually way inferior to every other Android (or even Windows Mobile) keyboard smartphone I had.

Actually, I'm done with the Priv. It's such a bad device:
  • you can't root it, which means you can't use tons of great features that are out there (there are some specific ones I need)
  • you can't install a decent ROM on it
  • you can't get rid of the Blackberry bloatware
  • the BT stack is crap:
    1. when I put on a jacket and have my phone in my trouser pocket, the audio gets interrupted the whole time. We're talking about a distance of 50cm! Any other phone and my PC can go up to 10m without any interruptions
    2. sometimes it executes A2DP commands (Play/Pause, Next/Previous Track), sometimes it doesn't
  • the radio is generally bad, sometimes I get no reception at all where I got good reception previously or with other phones
  • the whole device is too big, you can't navigate it with one finger
  • the device is too angular and very unergonomic - making a phone call gets painful after a few minutes

So that's why I decided to sell my Priv and just recently bought a S6 Edge instead. Because that one has an official keyboard cover, plus there is also the SlimType cover from One2Touch. That Samsung phone is not ideal either, but it can't be worse than the Priv.
 
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dapgo

Member
Mar 2, 2015
48
1
It is a pity that Blackberry doesn't understand that some users don' need/want this secure/corporative phones. Just a device with a proper keyboard, an OS which can be rooted, install custom ROMS, stop the Google ****, maybe be able to install sailfish, etc....
There is no proper physical keyboards in the Android world, they could sell devices just because that, but if a keyboard means sacrifice freedom and control, at least I will not pay for it.
 

santimaster2000

Senior Member
Dec 25, 2009
374
96
Buenos Aires
It is a pity that Blackberry doesn't understand that some users don' need/want this secure/corporative phones. Just a device with a proper keyboard, an OS which can be rooted, install custom ROMS, stop the Google ****, maybe be able to install sailfish, etc....
There is no proper physical keyboards in the Android world, they could sell devices just because that, but if a keyboard means sacrifice freedom and control, at least I will not pay for it.

I would love to be able to voluntary give up my warranty in order to get root.
 
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RAMChYLD

Member
Jul 19, 2007
47
18
Klang
The reason I got a Priv is because of the world multi 4G radio and the keyboard, and that it runs Android. Security just a side thing. But now Blackberry has announced that the Priv has been EOLed, and even worse, we're not getting the Nougat update we were promised. The thing I'm really pissed off about is the empty promise regarding the Nougat update AND some apps are just dropping support for Marshmallow. If I'm intepreting the VLC changelog page for 3.0.0 right, we're not able to run this on anything older than Oreo? (It says 4.4 -> 8.0, which I take means that the minimum Android OS support has been increased from 4.4 to 8.0? On the other hand, it looks like they're dropping XP, Vista, 7, 8 and 8.1 support as well since Windows requirements read XP -> 10? That's a death wish if you ask me).
 
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elchmartin

Senior Member
Oct 17, 2014
143
44
Duesseldorf
i will have the opportunity to check out a priv in some days.
coming from oneplus3t I am curious what it will feel like :D

i guess there is still no way to root ... so no adaway. dns66 might fill this gap.
 

Kyle M.

Senior Member
Feb 2, 2015
77
5
Hamburg
Here's my shot in the dark, but please take it with a pinch of salt, I'm probably wrong about this.

There's a youtuber who lives in Shenzen, he loves messing about with his iPhone and the other day he replaced a flash memory on the motherboard to upgrade to 128GB using tools which apparently weren't so hard to get (microscope, heat gun, solder paste, solder template, some spare chips, chip reader...).
Say someone has these tools, hypothetically they could pull out the eMMC from a priv and replace it with either a reprogrammed one, or (if the P/N match), one from a different phone. Can someone with SoC expertise shine some light on this please?
 

gmirz2005

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2017
134
39
Yerevan
Unfortunately, even disoldering the eMMC chip won't work. The data is encrypted and only God knows where the hell the decryption key is stored and how much will it take to crack the password, maybe even 10000+ years depending on what kind of algorithm was used to encrypt the data. You can't even modify the OS that you can download to reload as everything is being checked by DTEK chip inside the PRIV and CoT chip. There is no way to solve this fast. It will be a very long proccess. If someone has the time, then do it. But I write all this from PRIV and I am interested in all this too, but I don't think that it will be cheaper than just buying a new phone...
 

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  • 10
    Do people here not understand that BlackBerry has always been about security? The whole point of the Priv, and all other BlackBerry handsets is that they can't be 'rooted', exploited or jeopardised in any way, thanks to the years of experience that they have in making secure software platforms.

    Pick a non-BlackBerry phone to root, and have some respect.

    No, the whole point of the Priv is having a good keyboard and Android.
    3
    Do people here not understand that BlackBerry has always been about security? The whole point of the Priv, and all other BlackBerry handsets is that they can't be 'rooted', exploited or jeopardised in any way, thanks to the years of experience that they have in making secure software platforms.

    Pick a non-BlackBerry phone to root, and have some respect.
    2
    difficult but not impossible...

    Hey,

    so far that is pretty much the default design for a chain of trust. Nothing special here. But even these system cannot protect against every attack. The problem we are talking about here is always persistence, right. We might be able to takeover the phone, by utilizing an browser exploit or any other type of exploit, but once the device is rebooting all will be gone.

    The challenge now is find a way to reinvoke the exploit after boot without doing it by direct manipulation of the system or one of the binaries.

    This is certainly possible, but it has to be researched. IPhone jailbreaks are not different, btw.

    My idea would be to have a look at all of the system application so see if they use a mechanism like for example Java Reflection or Serialization. Sometimes applications do dirty things like delay load code with a mechanism different from a default invokation. The interesting part here is that once such a mechanism is found you will be likely have to possibility to create a "modified" payload that resides in the "data" part of an application and luckily that cannot be protected by a boot chain of trust.

    I have a Blackberry Priv here, and it will be vulnerable ( haven't used it for quite some time... ). When I have some free time, I will give it a try.

    Regards,
    mitp0sh of [pdx]

    When u turn the power on them the boot chain of trust gets power:
    1. Primary Bootloader in the SoC, which loads
    2. secondary Bootloader. This loads the OS and after that the apps.
    All steps are signed by secret key.
    Every SoC has an own UID and secret key, which is protected by Fuse technology. These keys using ECC key-2-key Encryption to produce new keys.
    Because of the signing process none of the bootloaders can be compromised.
    The secondary Bootloader and the OS have non-editable eMMC starting addresses secured by Fuse.
    And the SoCs don't have JTAG anymore.
    2
    As well as a fantastic layer of security that is extremely tough to hack. Which I'll say again, is what BlackBerry have always put first and foremost.

    You can have both. That's how Secure Boot on Windows x86 works: you can disable the secure boot chain in the UEFI or, even better, enter your own keys that you sign your own binaries with. Of course, Android vendors are still refusing to accept their fate in becoming basic, boring hardware vendors (mind you, Google isn't exactly helping there), so they're locking down bootloaders and removing user control.. so we have to hack our way in instead.
    1
    Isn't QuadRooter the program that has been on tech sites regarding viruses/malware?
    It can be used maliciously because the exploits allow root access. We would just need someone to create an app (& manually disable Android's Verify Apps feature), that would inject SuperUser instead of a malicious app. I guess the next problem to overcome would be the Locked Bootloader, & if the PRIV's extra security settings would even allow the rooted phone to boot.
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