How To Guide September 12, 2022 Verizon factory image (TP1A.220905.004.A1) - PSA about Android 13 in OP - Unlocking the Pixel 6 Pro bootloader & central repository

Search This thread

Lughnasadh

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2015
3,900
4,166
Google Nexus 5
Huawei Nexus 6P
Let's just hope that ARB is only tied to downgrading to the A12 bootloader and not other parts of the OS as well.

Google's statement wasn't exactly clearcut in my mind. I think a bad result could potentially lead to a more than undesirable outcome, if you know what I mean. Of course, I could just be overly paranoid 🙃
Eh, the more I read about it the more I think it is just bootloader version related :)

Btw...

 

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
There is a high probability it is not actually USB-C to C. It might be the active cables many use now (those with integrated chip), it might be the platform, and lastly, you also said "flash" but did you mean sideload or fastboot? Because i verified both ADB and Fastboot on that connection first and most functions returned no errors. Only when i went into recovery and there into sideload mode, that connection was bad.
None of my USB-C (or USB-A -> USB-C) cables are active cables. They're just normal, inexpensive but quality basic cables. Or do you mean yours?

I never sideload, but that would indeed be strange if actually flashing a full factory image would work 100% but sideloading wouldn't. I wouldn't accept basic ADB and Fastboot commands as being enough indication that the connection definitely works for flashing a full factory image, either.

I could do some more digging like I used to back in my HTC days, grab my top tier notebook and run the sideloading again there to see if it still applies, swap cables from active to passive, etc, but on the one hand i really dont have the nerves for that anymore and on the other hand it should suffice for readers to know they should consider the connection when things fail.
That's okay. I accept that the same solution isn't necessary for everyone, I just wanted to put it out there that what caused the issue for you and for some people might not necessarily be a problem for others. And absolutely, the particular hardware involved can be the issue. A long time ago, I used to run into more finicky flashing issues where using particular ports mattered. My latest self-built desktop from a year and three-quarters ago has had much better luck flashing no matter what USB port I use.
 

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
I forgot to extract the contents of image file (.zip) into the ADB folder, so ADB had trouble locating the needed files. Once I extracted the files into the ADB folder, it all started working.
Awesome! Glad it was something simple. Happens to all of us from time to time. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lughnasadh

Homeboy76

Senior Member
Aug 24, 2012
3,375
1,907
Google Pixel XL
@Lughnasadh @roirraW "edor" ehT

:unsure: What if you edited the flash-all.bat file this way (see bold information below). Would it flash the new factory image to boot slots?

If yes, that would eliminate the need to add --skip-reboot or the need to switch slots.

...PATH=%PATH%;"%SYSTEMROOT%\System32"
fastboot flash bootloader bootloader-bramble-b5-0.5-8633619.img --slot-all
fastboot reboot-bootloader
ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 >nul
fastboot flash radio radio-bramble-g7250-00208-220623-b-8759277.img --slot-all
fastboot reboot-bootloader
ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 >nul
fastboot update image-bramble-tp1a.220624.014.zip... --slot-all
 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
@Lughnasadh @roirraW "edor" ehT

:unsure: What if you edited the flash-all.bat file this way (see bold information below). Would it flash the new factory image to boot slots?

If yes, that would eliminate the need to add --skip-reboot or the need to switch slots.

  • @Echo off
    :: Copyright 2012 The Android Open Source Project
    ::
    :: Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
    :: you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
    :: You may obtain a copy of the License at
    ::
    :: http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
    ::
    :: Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
    :: distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
    :: WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
    :: See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
    :: limitations under the License.

    PATH=%PATH%;"%SYSTEMROOT%\System32"
    fastboot flash bootloader bootloader-bramble-b5-0.5-8633619.img --slot-all
    fastboot reboot-bootloader
    ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 >nul
    fastboot flash radio radio-bramble-g7250-00208-220623-b-8759277.img --slot-all
    fastboot reboot-bootloader
    ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 >nul
    fastboot update image-bramble-tp1a.220624.014.zip --slot-all

    echo Press any key to exit...
    pause >nul
    exit
Ah, good point. I forgot about that, but that does seem familiar now. My answer is: probably.
 

Zilla0617

Senior Member
Have an issue that I can't solve. Ever since I upgraded to A13 my device will not sleep, 100% awake. Never had this issue and I'm trying to avoid performing a factory reset.

So I'm seeing system server and Android hardware sensors causing high cpu when I check in terminal. The hardware sensor specifically is Android hardware sensors @2.1-service.multihal. I tried restarting, reflashing with -w, changing kernels. Nothing works

EDIT: After performing a factory reset, still encountered the issue. Tap, Tap ended up being the cause of the high drain. Once I forced stop the app, my CPU went down. Ultimately, deleted the app. Phone enters deep sleep now
 
Last edited:
  • Wow
Reactions: roirraW "edor" ehT

Lughnasadh

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2015
3,900
4,166
Google Nexus 5
Huawei Nexus 6P
@Lughnasadh @roirraW "edor" ehT

:unsure: What if you edited the flash-all.bat file this way (see bold information below). Would it flash the new factory image to boot slots?

If yes, that would eliminate the need to add --skip-reboot or the need to switch slots.

  • @Echo off
    :: Copyright 2012 The Android Open Source Project
    ::
    :: Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0 (the "License");
    :: you may not use this file except in compliance with the License.
    :: You may obtain a copy of the License at
    ::
    :: http://www.apache.org/licenses/LICENSE-2.0
    ::
    :: Unless required by applicable law or agreed to in writing, software
    :: distributed under the License is distributed on an "AS IS" BASIS,
    :: WITHOUT WARRANTIES OR CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND, either express or implied.
    :: See the License for the specific language governing permissions and
    :: limitations under the License.

    PATH=%PATH%;"%SYSTEMROOT%\System32"
    fastboot flash bootloader bootloader-bramble-b5-0.5-8633619.img --slot-all
    fastboot reboot-bootloader
    ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 >nul
    fastboot flash radio radio-bramble-g7250-00208-220623-b-8759277.img --slot-all
    fastboot reboot-bootloader
    ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 >nul
    fastboot update image-bramble-tp1a.220624.014.zip --slot-all

    echo Press any key to exit...
    pause >nul
    exit
I know that works for flashing boot images to both slots, but I couldn't say definitively it would work with flashing the whole factory image. I look forward to you trying and telling us how it went 🙃🤣
 

Homeboy76

Senior Member
Aug 24, 2012
3,375
1,907
Google Pixel XL
I know that works for flashing boot images to both slots, but I couldn't say definitively it would work with flashing the whole factory image. I look forward to you trying and telling us how it went 🙃🤣
@Lughnasadh @roirraW "edor" ehT

:rolleyes::oops: The factory image is large.

So, maybe these edits of the flash-all.bat file are better:

...fastboot update image-bramble-tp1a.220624.014.zip...
fastboot--skip-reboot
fastboot --set-active=a (If you're on slot b)
fastboot --set-active=b (If you're on slot a)
fastboot reboot-bootloader
ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 >nul
- Verify bootloader slot change
- At the command prompt (on your computer), type flash-all to flash the factory image to the other slot.

Or

Flash the factory image to your phone.
After it reboots
- set you phone up
- Reboot
- fastboot adb reboot bootloader
- Change slot
fastboot --set-active=a (If you're on slot b)
fastboot --set-active=b (If you're on slot a)
Flash the factory image to the other slot by typing flash-all at the command prompt.
 
Last edited:

Lughnasadh

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2015
3,900
4,166
Google Nexus 5
Huawei Nexus 6P
:rolleyes::oops: The factory image is large.
But seriously, I'm not sure it's even a good idea to do that. What if something goes wrong during flashing and you have both slots end up being corrupted? May be harder to get out of. Not impossible of course since there may be other methods to recover. For me, it's always nice that you know what of your slots is still good (e.g. when you get into a bootloop and it eventually switches to the other slot to boot). It's really just a time and effort saver to do both slots at once but not sure the rewards would outweigh the possible pitfalls, at least for me.

Just my 2 cents...
 

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
so what's the definitive situation re going back to 12 after you've updated to 13?
I don't think there is a definitive situation, as no one has expressed wanting to go back. :)

The only thing I know for sure is that if you're still on Android 12, you can definitely flash the Android 13 Stable bootloader ONLY, and I was still able to boot Android 12. Doesn't mean squat, really.

Downgrading without wiping is always a very risky thing: After upgrading to a newer version (even a regular monthly update), system app data may have been updated as well (it's very likely at least some system apps have). Downgrading to an earlier version of Android won't downgrade the app data, so suddenly you're running an older version of Android with app data meant for a newer version. At best, you'll have weird issues. At worst, your phone won't boot. I don't have the time to set my phone up from scratch if I can help it, so I won't be testing downgrading (with or without Android 12's bootloader) any time.

If you have the time and test this process, please let us know how it works out. It's "possible" that you can flash everything from Android 12 but the bootloader itself, and it might still work. Even if so, this doesn't mean that a further bootloader change in Android 13 after more updates will remain compatible with Android 12.

I haven't liked doing mix or match partition images on my device in the last six years, however.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lughnasadh

whatsisnametake2

Senior Member
Sep 15, 2008
338
125
Samsung Galaxy S7
Google Pixel 6 Pro
I don't think there is a definitive situation, as no one has expressed wanting to go back. :)

The only thing I know for sure is that if you're still on Android 12, you can definitely flash the Android 13 Stable bootloader ONLY, and I was still able to boot Android 12. Doesn't mean squat, really.

Downgrading without wiping is always a very risky thing: After upgrading to a newer version (even a regular monthly update), system app data may have been updated as well (it's very likely at least some system apps have). Downgrading to an earlier version of Android won't downgrade the app data, so suddenly you're running an older version of Android with app data meant for a newer version. At best, you'll have weird issues. At worst, your phone won't boot. I don't have the time to set my phone up from scratch if I can help it, so I won't be testing downgrading (with or without Android 12's bootloader) any time.

If you have the time and test this process, please let us know how it works out. It's "possible" that you can flash everything from Android 12 but the bootloader itself, and it might still work. Even if so, this doesn't mean that a further bootloader change in Android 13 after more updates will remain compatible with Android 12.

I haven't liked doing mix or match partition images on my device in the last six years, however.
fair enough. what is the technical reason you can't flash a 12 bootloader after a 13 bootloader? is it not just flashing data into a certain area of the phones memory? overwriting any existing data? outside my knowledge zone that one.
 
  • Like
Reactions: roirraW "edor" ehT

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
fair enough. what is the technical reason you can't flash a 12 bootloader after a 13 bootloader? is it not just flashing data into a certain area of the phones memory? overwriting any existing data? outside my knowledge zone that one.
This warning at this page:
Warning: The Android 13 update for Pixel 6, Pixel 6 Pro, and the Pixel 6a contains a bootloader update that increments the anti-roll back version. After flashing an Android 13 build on these devices you will not be able to flash older Android 12 builds.

and:

August 15, 2022 2:10pm Adam Conway

PSA: You can’t downgrade from Android 13 on Google’s latest Pixel phones​


Android 13 was just released for Google’s Pixel smartphones, and you can install it right away by going to your phone’s settings and checking for an update. However, if you have a Google Pixel 6, Google Pixel 6 Pro, or a Google Pixel 6a, then be warned: trying to roll back to Android 12 after updating will trip your phone’s anti-rollback protection. This means that the update to Android 13 is essentially permanent.
We spotted the warning on the Android 13 factory images page, where it says the following:
“The Android 13 update for Pixel 6, Pixel 6 Pro, and the Pixel 6a contains a bootloader update that increments the anti-roll back version. After flashing an Android 13 build on these devices you will not be able to flash older Android 12 builds.”
This anti-rollback protection is not unlike mechanisms that some companies, such as Xiaomi, have employed in the past. For context, Xiaomi implemented anti-rollback protection by surprise on the Redmi Note 5 through a software update. When users went to downgrade they then bricked their smartphones, as they did not know they needed to be careful.

If you use your phone normally and don’t flash between different system images, then you have nothing to worry about. However, if you’re the kind of person that likes to jump between different versions, maybe hold off for a little bit. It’s not clear if you’ll actually brick your phone by downgrading after updating to Android 13, but it’s better to be safe than sorry and to wait and see what happens. You also don’t need to worry about it if you’re using an older Google Pixel phone.
As for why this only affects the latest Pixel phones, it’s not clear. However, all three of these devices are powered by Google Tensor, meaning that it might be something unique to Tensor, and might be why Google is implementing it. Anti-rollback protection is implemented through Verified Boot, and will ensure that a security vulnerability cannot be used by a malicious actor to install an older version of the Android system.


Source: Android factory images page

I don't know anything technical about it beyond the information given in those two places.
 

whatsisnametake2

Senior Member
Sep 15, 2008
338
125
Samsung Galaxy S7
Google Pixel 6 Pro
This warning at this page:


and:



I don't know anything technical about it beyond the information given in those two places.
thanks for the info. I don't understand why google is doing this tho. they are very liberal when it comes to flashing and rooting. why implement an anti roll back boot loader? what's wrong with going back to 12 if you have some random issue on 13?
 

CRXed

Senior Member
Jan 7, 2010
1,980
1,255
But seriously, I'm not sure it's even a good idea to do that. What if something goes wrong during flashing and you have both slots end up being corrupted? May be harder to get out of. Not impossible of course since there may be other methods to recover. For me, it's always nice that you know what of your slots is still good (e.g. when you get into a bootloop and it eventually switches to the other slot to boot). It's really just a time and effort saver to do both slots at once but not sure the rewards would outweigh the possible pitfalls, at least for me.

Just my 2 cents...
But isn't this whole BOTH slots discussion coming from the warning that if it fails to boot on the active slot, it can brick your device??

 
  • Like
Reactions: roirraW "edor" ehT

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
thanks for the info. I don't understand why google is doing this tho. they are very liberal when it comes to flashing and rooting. why implement an anti roll back boot loader? what's wrong with going back to 12 if you have some random issue on 13?
There are many possible reasons. It could even be as simple as that they determined that downgrading the bootloader from Android 13's is dangerous/resulted in bricks in testing, so they'll just disable the ability to downgrade it from 13's. There's also this from the XDA article I quoted:
Anti-rollback protection is implemented through Verified Boot, and will ensure that a security vulnerability cannot be used by a malicious actor to install an older version of the Android system.

And we don't definitively know that we absolutely can't still flash Android 12 (minus 12's bootloader), at least along with wiping the phone.
 
Last edited:

V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Flashing to both slots should not brick your device. The only thing that should cause a brick is if something goes wrong with the bootloader. This is the one disadvantage with the OTA - it only updates one bootloader slot, and it seems that once Android 13 boots, it's no longer possible to go back to an older bootloader.

So, if you want to be really safe, flash the updated bootloader to both slots, then update however you want. If it fails and switches slots, you should still be able to reflash.
 

Top Liked Posts

  • There are no posts matching your filters.
  • 5
    This thread confuses me. Can one root a device that is currently sim locked?
    SIM locking, which locks your SIM card to your device, i.e. can't move that same SIM card with another device, is not the same as being Carrier locked. The ability to lock your SIM card to your device is controlled by you only - by default, SIM cards are not locked to the device. You can use the search field in the device Settings to find "SIM card lock", which is in the "More security settings" submenu.

    As the others have said, Carrier unlocking and having the ability to bootloader unlock are two separate things, but typically if a device is not carrier unlocked, then you are also not able to unlock the bootloader. Being carrier unlocked does not necessarily mean you can unlock the bootloader. Example 1: Verizon. Example 2: All Samsung devices bought in the United States that can have mobile data connections. Samsung WI-Fi-only tablets can be bootloader unlocked (at the cost of tripping KNOX permanently), but obviously, in that case, there's no carrier involved.
    5
    Looks like they finally updated the "Updating Pixel 6, Pixel 6 Pro, and Pixel 6a devices to Android 13 for the first time" section on the download page to include the correct command for Option 2 (adb reboot bootloader rather than adb reboot fastboot).
    5

    BulletinLanguagesPublished dateSecurity patch level
    September 2022Coming soonSeptember 6, 20222022-09-05

    Pixel Update Bulletin—September 2022​


    Published September 6, 2022
    The Pixel Update Bulletin contains details of security vulnerabilities and functional improvements affecting supported Pixel devices (Google devices). For Google devices, security patch levels of 2022-09-05 or later address all issues in this bulletin and all issues in the September 2022 Android Security Bulletin. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, see Check and update your Android version.
    All supported Google devices will receive an update to the 2022-09-05 patch level. We encourage all customers to accept these updates to their devices.
    Note: The Google device firmware images are available on the Google Developer site.

    Announcements​

    • In addition to the security vulnerabilities described in the September 2022 Android Security Bulletin, Google devices also contain patches for the security vulnerabilities described below.

    Security patches​

    Vulnerabilities are grouped under the component that they affect. There is a description of the issue and a table with the CVE, associated references, type of vulnerability, severity, and updated Android Open Source Project (AOSP) versions (where applicable). When available, we link the public change that addressed the issue to the bug ID, like the AOSP change list. When multiple changes relate to a single bug, additional references are linked to numbers following the bug ID.

    Kernel components​

    CVEReferencesTypeSeverityComponent
    CVE-2022-28388A-228694483
    Upstream kernel
    EoPModerateKernel

    Pixel​

    CVEReferencesTypeSeverityComponent
    CVE-2022-20231A-211485702*EoPCriticalTrusty
    CVE-2022-20364A-233606615*EoPCriticalKernel

    Qualcomm components​

    CVEReferencesSeverityComponent
    CVE-2022-25654A-223230190
    QC-CR#3075470
    ModerateKernel

    Qualcomm closed-source components​

    CVEReferencesSeverityComponent
    CVE-2022-25653A-223230071*ModerateClosed-source component

    Functional patches​

    For details on the new bug fixes and functional patches included in this release, refer to the Pixel Community forum.

    Common questions and answers​

    This section answers common questions that may occur after reading thisulletin.
    1. How do I determine if my device is updated to address these issues?
    Security patch levels of 2022-09-05 or later address all issues associated with the 2022-09-05 security patch level and all previous patch levels. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, read the instructions on the Google device update schedule.
    2. What do the entries in the Type column mean?
    Entries in the Type column of the vulnerability details table reference the classification of the security vulnerability.
    AbbreviationDefinition
    RCERemote code execution
    EoPElevation of privilege
    IDInformation disclosure
    DoSDenial of service
    N/AClassification not available
    3. What do the entries in the References column mean?
    Entries under the References column of the vulnerability details table may contain a prefix identifying the organization to which the reference value belongs.
    PrefixReference
    A-Android bug ID
    QC-Qualcomm reference number
    M-MediaTek reference number
    N-NVIDIA reference number
    B-Broadcom reference number
    U-UNISOC reference number
    4. What does an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column mean?
    Issues that are not publicly available have an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column. The update for that issue is generally contained in the latest binary drivers for Pixel devices available from the Google Developer site.
    5. Why are security vulnerabilities split between this bulletin and the Android Security Bulletins?
    Security vulnerabilities that are documented in the Android Security Bulletins are required to declare the latest security patch level on Android devices. Additional security vulnerabilities, such as those documented in this bulletin are not required for declaring a security patch level.

    Versions​

    VersionDateNotes
    1.0September 6, 2022Bulletin Published
    4
    @roirraW "edor" ehT Thank you, I was just curious in case a situation appeared again where I needed to have both slots the same (I like to ask before I get stuck up a creek w/o a paddle).
    You're welcome. Understood.

    Just at minimum do (and you should do first thing):
    Code:
    fastboot flash bootloader --slot all bootloader.img
    And that'll prevent you from getting stuck. Not doing that, you could wind up being bricked to a point where only Google could repair the phone.
  • 59
    SURPRISE new Factory Image:


    13.0.0 (TP1A.220905.004.A1, Sep 2022, Verizon, Verizon MVNOs)FlashLink5e431fe5b488b48c4543a22f18356d1ad45c04fdab07bfe451ca13bdf08d0039

    I see the September update for the 6a also came out. :)

    September 2022 factory image is available:

    13.0.0 (TP1A.220905.004, Sep 2022)FlashLink4dba4ced0ea829e3d334dee55d8b15daa4cd1b57848417a8787d68a0b6ce3793

    Kush M.
    Community Manager•Original Poster

    Google Pixel Update - September 2022​

    Announcement
    Hello Pixel Community,

    We have provided the monthly software update for September 2022. All supported Pixel devices running Android 13 will receive these software updates starting today. The rollout will continue over the next week in phases depending on carrier and device. Pixel 6a devices will receive the update later this month. Users will receive a notification once the OTA becomes available for their device. We encourage you to check your Android version and update to receive the latest software.

    Details of this month’s security fixes can be found on the Android Security Bulletin: https://source.android.com/security/bulletin

    Thanks,
    Google Pixel Support Team


    Software versions

    Global
    • Pixel 4 (XL): TP1A.220905.004
    • Pixel 4a: TP1A.220905.004
    • Pixel 4a (5G): TP1A.220905.004
    • Pixel 5: TP1A.220905.004
    • Pixel 5a (5G): TP1A.220905.004
    • Pixel 6: TP1A.220905.004
    • Pixel 6 Pro: TP1A.220905.004

    What’s included

    The September 2022 update includes bug fixes and improvements for Pixel users – see below for details.

    Battery & Charging
    • Fix for issue occasionally causing increased battery drain from certain launcher background activities
    • Fix for issue preventing wireless charging mode to activate in certain conditions *[1]

    Biometrics
    • Additional improvements for fingerprint recognition and response in certain conditions *[2]

    Bluetooth
    • Fix for issue occasionally preventing certain Bluetooth devices or accessories from connecting

    User Interface
    • Fix for issue occasionally causing notifications to appear truncated on the lock screen
    ---------------------------------------------------------------

    Device Applicability

    Fixes are available for all supported Pixel devices unless otherwise indicated below.

    *[1] Included on Pixel 4, Pixel 4 XL, Pixel 5, Pixel 6 & Pixel 6 Pro
    *[2] Included on Pixel 6a


    Details
    Other

    BulletinLanguagesPublished dateSecurity patch level
    September 2022Coming soonSeptember 6, 20222022-09-05

    Pixel Update Bulletin—September 2022​


    Published September 6, 2022
    The Pixel Update Bulletin contains details of security vulnerabilities and functional improvements affecting supported Pixel devices (Google devices). For Google devices, security patch levels of 2022-09-05 or later address all issues in this bulletin and all issues in the September 2022 Android Security Bulletin. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, see Check and update your Android version.
    All supported Google devices will receive an update to the 2022-09-05 patch level. We encourage all customers to accept these updates to their devices.
    Note: The Google device firmware images are available on the Google Developer site.

    Announcements​

    • In addition to the security vulnerabilities described in the September 2022 Android Security Bulletin, Google devices also contain patches for the security vulnerabilities described below.

    Security patches​

    Vulnerabilities are grouped under the component that they affect. There is a description of the issue and a table with the CVE, associated references, type of vulnerability, severity, and updated Android Open Source Project (AOSP) versions (where applicable). When available, we link the public change that addressed the issue to the bug ID, like the AOSP change list. When multiple changes relate to a single bug, additional references are linked to numbers following the bug ID.

    Kernel components​

    CVEReferencesTypeSeverityComponent
    CVE-2022-28388A-228694483
    Upstream kernel
    EoPModerateKernel

    Pixel​

    CVEReferencesTypeSeverityComponent
    CVE-2022-20231A-211485702*EoPCriticalTrusty
    CVE-2022-20364A-233606615*EoPCriticalKernel

    Qualcomm components​

    CVEReferencesSeverityComponent
    CVE-2022-25654A-223230190
    QC-CR#3075470
    ModerateKernel

    Qualcomm closed-source components​

    CVEReferencesSeverityComponent
    CVE-2022-25653A-223230071*ModerateClosed-source component

    Functional patches​

    For details on the new bug fixes and functional patches included in this release, refer to the Pixel Community forum.

    Common questions and answers​

    This section answers common questions that may occur after reading thisulletin.
    1. How do I determine if my device is updated to address these issues?
    Security patch levels of 2022-09-05 or later address all issues associated with the 2022-09-05 security patch level and all previous patch levels. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, read the instructions on the Google device update schedule.
    2. What do the entries in the Type column mean?
    Entries in the Type column of the vulnerability details table reference the classification of the security vulnerability.
    AbbreviationDefinition
    RCERemote code execution
    EoPElevation of privilege
    IDInformation disclosure
    DoSDenial of service
    N/AClassification not available
    3. What do the entries in the References column mean?
    Entries under the References column of the vulnerability details table may contain a prefix identifying the organization to which the reference value belongs.
    PrefixReference
    A-Android bug ID
    QC-Qualcomm reference number
    M-MediaTek reference number
    N-NVIDIA reference number
    B-Broadcom reference number
    U-UNISOC reference number
    4. What does an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column mean?
    Issues that are not publicly available have an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column. The update for that issue is generally contained in the latest binary drivers for Pixel devices available from the Google Developer site.
    5. Why are security vulnerabilities split between this bulletin and the Android Security Bulletins?
    Security vulnerabilities that are documented in the Android Security Bulletins are required to declare the latest security patch level on Android devices. Additional security vulnerabilities, such as those documented in this bulletin are not required for declaring a security patch level.

    Versions​

    VersionDateNotes
    1.0September 6, 2022Bulletin Published

    Regarding Developer Support Android 12 images, see @Lughnasadh's post here.

    I am not linking directly to the Developer Support Android 12 images because I don't want them to be confused with Stable Android 12, and since the Developer Support images won't receive any OTAs...ever. They likely also will never be manually updated on the Developer Support images site, so they will forever be stuck with the security patch level they're currently on, which will become further out of date every month. You can Google search Developer Support Android images if you want to find them.

    Platform Tools has been updated slightly to v33.0.3:

    Windows: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-windows.zip

    Mac: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-darwin.zip

    Linux: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-linux.zip

    Release Notes https://developer.android.com/studio/releases/platform-tools:

    33.0.3 (Aug 2022)​

    • adb
      • Don't retry adb root if first attempt failed.
      • Fix track-devices duplicate entry.
      • Add receive windowing (increase throughput on high-latency connections).
      • More specific error messages in the "more than one device" failure cases.
      • Reject unexpected reverse forward requests.
      • Fix install-multi-package on Windows.
    • fastboot
      • Remove e2fsdroid as part of SDK platform-tools.
      • Print OemCmdHandler return message on success.

    TL;DR regarding the PSA. If you update one slot to Android 13, you can fastboot reboot bootloader after and then fastboot --set-active=other to change slots in order to flash Android 13 to the new slot, but IF you have Android 13 on one slot and still have Android 12 (including Android 12 bootloader) on the other slot and you try to fully boot into Android 12, you will be permanently bricked and have to seek repair from Google. No one has yet found a way to repair this on our own. I will update if there is any progress. At least a small handful, and probably more, people have done this already.

    At a minimum, do this first: fastboot flash bootloader --slot all bootloader-devicename-slider-1.2-3456789.img (change the name of the bootloader file to the one for your device), then you *should* be much safer than without doing that first. Also note that the bootloader is NOT the same as boot.img (kernel). The bootloader image file has "bootloader" in the filename.

    IF you have already bricked your phone and the screen is blank - there is likely nothing we can do to help. You should seek to get a repair from Google, possibly under warranty.


    You CANNOT go back to Android 12 Stable. It *seems* as if you can, but Android 12 will not work 100% correctly after updating to the Android 13 bootloader.

    My tiny, early, very mini-review of Android 13 is here.

    Note that this is mainly for the officially listed "Unlocked" Pixel 6 Pro, available directly from the Google Store. All of this will also apply to any other (carrier-specific) variant of the Pixel 6 Pro which you can achieve an unlocked bootloader on. This includes T-Mobile and AT&T variants. It's likely Verizon variants will never be able to unlock their bootloader, or if so it will require paying the right person to do so.

    Feel free to ask about general questions, but for anything that's specific to your variant, you should use one of the other already existing threads. You'll find Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile-related threads in those respective search results.

    Here there be dragons. 🐉 I am not responsible for anything at all. 😹

    Unlocking or locking the bootloader will wipe the device every single time, so be sure to have your data backed up before doing so, or better yet, just unlock it as soon as you get the device.


    Keep in mind that unlocking the bootloader or rooting might affect your phone's capability to use banking apps such as Google Pay, your local bank's app, or even the ability to install some apps like NetFlix. See @Pekempy's thread Working SafetyNet with Pixel 6 Pro Android 12

    If you're going to re-lock the bootloader, make sure the ROM you have on your phone is completely stock (by flashing the latest official firmware) BEFORE re-locking it.

    There are no negative consequences if you unlock or re-lock the bootloader other than it will wipe your phone, and while unlocked you get a brief screen when you boot the phone telling you (and anyone who sees your phone at the time) that the bootloader is unlocked. You will also continue to receive updates (if you've merely unlocked the bootloader, you can take updates as normal) unlike Samsung, Sony, et cetera, which have permanent major consequences with reduced functionality even if you un-root and re-lock your bootloader. If you're actually rooted (not just bootloader unlocked), you'll have to perform extra steps to manually update each month, and to keep root/re-root.


    All posts about Google Pay or banking will be reported to be deleted. Please keep this thread on-topic. There are at least one or two other How To Guide threads in this section in which folks discuss how to get around banking app restrictions when you're rooted or just have an unlocked bootloader. See @Pekempy's thread Working SafetyNet with Pixel 6 Pro Android 12
    If users persist in discussing banking apps in this thread, I will have this thread locked and only update this first post when there is new and updated information regarding the subjects of the title of the thread: Unlocking the Pixel 6 Pro bootloader, rooting, and TWRP. See @Pekempy's thread Working SafetyNet with Pixel 6 Pro Android 12

    Honorable mention to @Jawomo's aodNotify - Notification Light / LED for Pixel 6 Pro! (XDA link) / Notification light / LED for Pixel - aodNotify (Play Store link), which in my opinion restores useful functionality missing in most phones these days. It also solves some subjective issues some folks have with AOD (Always On Display), and/or solves/works around the problem where AOD is required for the optical fingerprint reader to work without the screen being on.​


    Check warranty status - *may* reveal if a phone is refurbished, only if the phone was refurbished through Google - thanks to @Alekos for making me aware of the site.
    Official Google Pixel Update and Software Repair (reported as of January 23, 2022 to still not be updated for the Pixel 6/Pro yet)

    Google's Help Page for Find problem apps by rebooting to safe mode - this can be a lifesaver and keep you from having to do a restore to 100% complete stock or even from having to do a factory reset. This will deactivate all Magisk modules, and they'll remain deactivated even after you boot normally after briefly booting to safe mode. You can reenable the Magisk modules as you wish to try to narrow down the problem if it was caused by a Magisk module. This can even get things working again after a Magisk Module wasn't finished installing and potentially causing a bootloop.

    Official Google Pixel Install fingerprint calibration software (also available at the bottom of the Update and Software Repair page above) - I believe this is only helpful if you've replaced the screen
    Official Google Android Flash Tool (OEM Unlocking needs to be toggled on - you may not have to manually unlock the bootloader - the "site" will do that on its own)
    OEM unlocking in developer options needs to be toggled on. I don't "believe" you have to actually do the "fastboot flashing unlock" command.

    ADB/Fastboot, Windows Drivers, and unlocking the bootloader (thanks @sidhaarthm for confirming unlocking the bootloader works as intended, be sure to thank him in his post)
    • You'll need this if you're going to unlock the bootloader on your Pixel 6 Pro: SDK Platform Tools (download links for Windows, Mac, and Linux). Note that you can find links to download the tools elsewhere, but I wouldn't trust them - you never know if they've been modified. Even if the person providing the link didn't do anything intentionally, the tools could be modified without them being aware. Why take a chance of putting your phone security further at risk?
    • For Windows, get Google's drivers here Get the Google USB Driver (ADB will likely work while the phone is fully booted, but if you're like me, you'll need these drivers for after you "adb reboot-bootloader", to be able to use ADB and Fastboot.
    • Thanks to @96carboard for posting the details of unlocking the bootloader, be sure to thank him in his post. Unlocking or locking the bootloader will wipe the device every single time, so be sure to have your data backed up before doing so, or better yet, just unlock it as soon as you get the device. Keep in mind that unlocking the bootloader or rooting might affect your phone's capability to use banking apps such as Google Pay, or your local bank's app. If you're going to re-lock the bootloader, make sure the ROM you have on your phone is completely stock (by flashing the latest official firmware) BEFORE re-locking it. My experience on my Pixel 1 was that there were no negative consequences if you unlock or re-lock the bootloader other than it will wipe your phone, and while unlocked you get a brief screen when you boot the phone telling you (and anyone who sees your phone at the time) that the bootloader is unlocked. All of this should still be the case. You will also continue to receive updates. Unlike Samsung, Sony, et cetera, which have major consequences with reduced functionality even if you un-root and re-lock your bootloader. If you're actually rooted (not just bootloader unlocked), you'll have to perform extra steps to keep root/re-root.:


      The unlock process works like this:

      1) Take brand new fresh phone out of box. Do NOT put sim card in it, just power it on (you can put a SIM card if you want, you just don't have to).
      2) When it starts harassing you to join Google, hit "skip" and "remind me tomorrow" as applicable until you reach home screen. YOU DO NOT need to plug in a google account.
      3) Settings --> About --> Build number. Repeatedly tap it until it says you're a developer.
      4) Back --> Network --> WiFi and connect it.
      5) Back --> System --> Developer --> OEM unlocking (check), USB debugging (check), plug in USB, authorize on the phone when requested.

      Using the Platform Tools previously mentioned in command line/terminal:
      6) #
      Code:
      adb reboot-bootloader
      7) #
      Code:
      fastboot flashing unlock

      Now that you've unlocked it, it has been wiped, so repeat 1-4, then disable all the google spyware, and go ahead and start using it while waiting for aosp and root.

      Official Instructions for Locking/Unlocking the Bootloader
    Personally, I would always use the official drivers Google provides unless they just don't work for whatever reason: Get the Google USB Driver (this is for Windows). They work for me. They are rarely updated, but they are every once in a great while, sometimes years in-between.
    I agree with this. be careful using drivers or adb/fastboot tools. Some are fine, but there's no need for it really anymore. Google has made it very easy to install drivers and Platform-Tools (adb/fastboot tool).

    Google provides the Fastboot/ADB tool (Platform-Tools) and Google USB Drivers (adb/fastboot interface). This will allow any Pixel to interface with Windows using the fastboot/adb protocol. Official Google USB Driver includes support for both the Fastboot and ADB driver interface. There are 3 main drivers (Fastboot, ADB and MTP/Portable File Transfer). The MTP/Portable File Transfer driver is built-in to Windows 7-11.

    Fastboot/ADB Driver Interface - Official Download Link:
    When flashing a full image or unlocking your bootloader, the fastboot interface is being used.

    First Download official Google USB Drivers (it's a zip file). Extract the zip (important!). Right-click on the android_winusb.inf file and hit install. You can then restart your phone to the Bootloader Screen (hold vol-down while it restarts or turns on). When you plug in your phone, Windows Device Manager will show a new device at the top: Android Device: Android Bootloader Interface.

    Using the ADB interface: It's the same driver. Enable USB Debugging on your phone, then plug it in to your computer. A prompt will appear on your phone (to allow USB Debugging). The driver in Device Manager will appear as Android Device: Android Composite ADB interface.

    Now you can download and use Platform-Tools to flash an Android Image, OTA or run adb/fastboot commands.
    Official Download Page
    "Android SDK Platform-Tools is a component for the Android SDK. It includes tools that interface with the Android platform, such as adb, fastboot, and systrace"

    It's best to make Platform-Tools available system-wide. Download Platform-Tools from the above link and extract it to your C:\ drive - that way you will have a folder to add to the PATH Environment under Window System Properties Menu, Advanced, Environment Variables, System Variables, PATH (google how to do this, very easy). What this does is allow adb/fastboot commands to be run from anywhere in the system, so you don't have to be in the platform-tools folder to run adb/fastboot commands and flash an Android Image (Official or Android Fork such as ProtonAOSP).

    Rooting-related


    No longer applies - Things that make rooting more complicated on Android 12
    @V0latyle posted a new thread with some very important and fascinating information about the increased difficulty to root Android 12: Read this before rooting. Be sure to thank him there.

    A list of the other important guides - be sure to thank the respective OPs
    For all relevant guide threads just click the yellow "How To Guide" quick filter above the list of threads in the Pixel 6 Pro section.


    TWRP (not made for the Pixel 6 Pro yet - will update when it has)
    I would guess that this should be the appropriate URL for official TWRP custom recovery for the Pixel 6 Pro, but who knows when/if that will actually be made available, and it may become available unofficially in these forum sections before being made official. I'll adjust this URL as needed. https://twrp.me/google/googlepixel6pro.html.

    Custom kernels for stock ROM(s)

    Factory Images (requires an unlocked bootloader)
    It's also handy to have to the full official firmware available, whether it's to recovery from accidents or for actual development. Note the official link to the general Factory Images for Nexus and Pixel Devices page. The following link goes directly to the Pixel 6 Pro (Raven) section: Pixel 6 Pro Factory Images. I prefer to actually bookmark a link to the device listed immediately below the device I want the firmware for, because Google dumbly (in my opinion) puts the latest firmware at the bottom of the list for each particular device, and that ends up making you scroll a lot after a year or two of monthly updates.

    Note: You can still get the December 2021 Factory Images and OTA from this thread, if you need them for any reason: Alternate links to December - all full factory images and OTAs available

    Full OTA Images (doesn't require an unlocked bootloader)

    The usefulness of having Verity and Verification enabled (now that it's not needed for root) - post #2 below.

    Regarding P6P 5G model numbers and capabilities - post #3 below.

    List of all Pixel monthly security bulletins and Play System Updates - post #4 below.

    How I root and update (which is identical whether rooting the first time or updating):
    • Use the latest Magisk Stable (in my case, I keep the app "hidden" / renamed)
    • Used the full firmware zip, extracted to the same folder as the latest Platform Tools (S:\platform-tools)
    • Extracted the new boot.img
    • Copied new boot.img to the phone
    • Patched the new boot.img with Magisk Stable
    • Renamed Magisk'd boot.img so I know what version of firmware it's for
    • Copied the Magisk'd boot.img back to the computer
    • Disabled all my Magisk Modules
    • Removed the "-w " from the flash-all.bat
    • Re-edited the flash-all.bat to verify I saved it with the "-w " taken out
    • Open a Command Prompt, navigated to S:\platform-tools
    • adb reboot bootloader
    • flash-all.bat
    • Let phone boot, unlock it, check that it's working, allow the update process to finish (gave it five minutes or so)
    • adb reboot bootloader
    • fastboot flash boot kernel.img (renamed Magisk'd boot.img)
    • fastboot reboot
    • Unlock, check everything's working
    • Re-enabled the most basic Magisk Modules which I was sure wouldn't cause a critical issue
    • Reboot, unlock, made sure everything's working
    Back to modding!

    I may append these first four posts with further useful information or links as needed.
    15
    The unlock process works like this;

    1) Take brand new fresh phone out of box. Do NOT put sim card in it, just power it on.
    2) When it starts harassing you to join google, hit "skip" and "remind me tomorrow" as applicable until you reach home screen. YOU DO NOT need to plug in a google account.
    3) Settings --> About --> Build number. Tap it until it says you're a developer.
    4) Back --> Network --> Wifi and connect it.
    5) Back --> System --> Developer --> OEM unlocking (check), USB debugging (check), plug in USB, authorize when requested.
    6) # adb reboot-bootloader
    7) # fastboot flashing unlock

    Now that you've unlocked it, it has been wiped, so repeat 1-4, then disable all the google spyware, and go ahead and start using it while waiting for aosp and root.
    15
    SDK Platform Tools updated to v33.0.1 (March 2022):

    33.0.1 (March 2022)​

    • adb
      • Fixes Windows mdns crashes.
      • Fixes enable-verity/disable-verity on old devices.
      • Fixes "install multiple" on old devices
      • Improves the help output to include all supported compression methods.
    13
    Just to let everyone know, updating to .037 and re-rooting (without wiping anything) worked with no problems. My method is to just replace -w with --disable-verity --disable-verification in the flash-all.bat file and run the flash-all command. I then let it reboot, patch the boot image, return to bootloader and flash the patched boot image.

    Canary 23014

    EDIT: Thank you @ipdev for confirming my inquiry that this method would work back on Nov. 4 👍
    11
    SDK Platform Tools have been updated to v32.0.0 (January 2022). Update now before you forget and flashing the February update on the 7th gives you hassles. :)

    Direct download for Windows: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-windows.zip

    Revisions​

    32.0.0 (January 2022)​

    • adb
      • Fixed adb w/o args SEGV regression.
    • fastboot
      • Reinstated recovery execution from b/158156979 (removal of preprocessor guards for root/secure).