SM-G950U 9.0 Root With Chromebook?

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hammer280

Member
Jul 2, 2014
16
1
Xenia
Hey,

I have really been wanting to root my Galaxy-S8, and the only computer I have available to me currently is a Acer Chromebook. I've been doing a little research on the subject, and it doesn't seem like there's a lot of info on the topic - is that a sign I'm wasting my time?

Really curious if this is possible...
 

TheMadScientist

Recognized Contributor
Hey,

I have really been wanting to root my Galaxy-S8, and the only computer I have available to me currently is a Acer Chromebook. I've been doing a little research on the subject, and it doesn't seem like there's a lot of info on the topic - is that a sign I'm wasting my time?

Really curious if this is possible...

Root is only achievable on a nougat system Oreo and pie nope. I don't know if it's possible from a chrome book most of the rooting tools are based for windows. But jrkruse safestrap rev 5. Is the way
 

Gorvetco

New member
May 29, 2022
3
0
Root is only achievable on a nougat system Oreo and pie nope. I don't know if it's possible from a chrome book most of the rooting tools are based for windows. But jrkruse safestrap rev 5. Is the way
Uhmm...
Actually, I'm afraid that's incorrect. I understand this post was from 2019, but Chromebooks have never been able to use Windows packages and programs. Their OS is Chrome OS, which is basically android but with an enhanced chrome browsing experience. And everyone knows that Android is solely Linux based,... as android uses the linux kernel. You see, Linux is open source, right?... therefore, using the Linux kernels, the android developers were able to implement the various modifications that fit their needs.

Now, the Chromebooks, have actually brought even more Linux computing to the table. First off, they have a full fledged Linux distro in beta, that you can enable... Actually even without enabling the linux beta, Chromebooks all have access to the developer shell. As well as Chrome's very own "Crosh" terminal. Both of which are operable using linux commands. (Not windows)

And on just another note...
Google, over the past few years, actually has been working on a new Chrome browser. And by "past few years", I mean even at the time off this original post, up untill now, they've continuously been working on this thing. Lol Yes, I know... Incredible isn't it? Lol Any way, even though it is still currently being worked on Chromebook users now have access to this new brower, via enabling it through turning on a few flags in "Chrome://flags". So the main idea for this browser is actually to decouple the browser from the OS, giving the new Chrome Web browser, much more of a separation. (Which I'm definitely in favour of, and is far less confusing lol). So this new browser, has yet to actually be "officially named" (probably will just stay as "Chrome")... But for now, the developers have made it identifiable to us users, and have been referring to it as "LaCrOS". So, I just want to point out, that the name "LaCrOS" is actually derived from both the words "Linux" and "Chrome OS".

One thing, maybe is what you were thinking of, is that some Chromebooks (like my own) use the amd x86 processors, instead of Arm64, which is the same processors that you'd find in any windows computer (that is aside from, well... now Apple lol) But even though The Chromebooks that use x86 processing offer more of a powerful performance (as well as a powerful consumption of battery & memory) they still very much are Linux based machines... And are VERY VERY different than a windows computer. In order to run any Windows program or package on a Chromebook, you'd need some type of emulator allowing you to do so. Chromebooks, alike Androids, without use of an emulator, are only able to read, install, and run .apk files and not a windows .exe file.
 

TheMadScientist

Recognized Contributor
Uhmm...
Actually, I'm afraid that's incorrect. I understand this post was from 2019, but Chromebooks have never been able to use Windows packages and programs. Their OS is Chrome OS, which is basically android but with an enhanced chrome browsing experience. And everyone knows that Android is solely Linux based,... as android uses the linux kernel. You see, Linux is open source, right?... therefore, using the Linux kernels, the android developers were able to implement the various modifications that fit their needs.

Now, the Chromebooks, have actually brought even more Linux computing to the table. First off, they have a full fledged Linux distro in beta, that you can enable... Actually even without enabling the linux beta, Chromebooks all have access to the developer shell. As well as Chrome's very own "Crosh" terminal. Both of which are operable using linux commands. (Not windows)

And on just another note...
Google, over the past few years, actually has been working on a new Chrome browser. And by "past few years", I mean even at the time off this original post, up untill now, they've continuously been working on this thing. Lol Yes, I know... Incredible isn't it? Lol Any way, even though it is still currently being worked on Chromebook users now have access to this new brower, via enabling it through turning on a few flags in "Chrome://flags". So the main idea for this browser is actually to decouple the browser from the OS, giving the new Chrome Web browser, much more of a separation. (Which I'm definitely in favour of, and is far less confusing lol). So this new browser, has yet to actually be "officially named" (probably will just stay as "Chrome")... But for now, the developers have made it identifiable to us users, and have been referring to it as "LaCrOS". So, I just want to point out, that the name "LaCrOS" is actually derived from both the words "Linux" and "Chrome OS".

One thing, maybe is what you were thinking of, is that some Chromebooks (like my own) use the amd x86 processors, instead of Arm64, which is the same processors that you'd find in any windows computer (that is aside from, well... now Apple lol) But even though The Chromebooks that use x86 processing offer more of a powerful performance (as well as a powerful consumption of battery & memory) they still very much are Linux based machines... And are VERY VERY different than a windows computer. In order to run any Windows program or package on a Chromebook, you'd need some type of emulator allowing you to do so. Chromebooks, alike Androids, without use of an emulator, are only able to read, install, and run .apk files and not a windows .exe file.
Ummm. As I stated years ago. I didn't know. I didn't say yes.

We didn't need a long drawn out explanation of a chrome book. And so you know. I've had a hp windows laptop that I've swapped back and forth between windows and chrome os. For my kid.

Your post is completely irrelevant. As it is so old of a topic. Either way the methods for these devices are completely depreciated.

I am one of the people who helped out on these devices with heavy testing. Plus much much more.

By you telling me I was incorrect just shows that you are acting like a pompous know it all and trying to prove me wrong where I specifically said I didn't know. How does me saying I don't know make me incorrect?


On a side note. We here at xda don't much care to drag up old deals topics that have long since been gone and irrelevant.
Clutters the pages with old useless information
 

Gorvetco

New member
May 29, 2022
3
0
It wasn't irrelevant. I disagree.
Furthermore, the original question was regarding Chromebooks specifically, and not Chrome OS. So my apologies, but shouldn't even the oldest of threads be contemporized if the new information or tools now available have changed since then? But as I did mention, this was not the point of what I wanted to make clear.

I did not say anything regarding the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of utilizing a Chromebook to obtain root on an seperate android device. Nor did I state that you were incorrect. I'm well aware, that it would be ignorant and frankly just unfair to disparage you based on the knowledge available at the given point in time. However, it's unfortunate that you felt obligated to retaliate in such a manner, as It was very clear of what my actual intensions here were, and that it was not in any way a means to belittle you.

There is something you may just have me on though. For in the sense that I guess I am unsure of the protocol here at XDA. But I still do not feel that attacking me was the right way to go about your response. You see, I'm a member at both GitHub, and Stack exchange. So I guess I just assumed that because there is plenty of room for misinterpretation, and at times even errors, so honestly, some of the best ways to further our understanding is when we converse and can learn from one another. In any case, I had noticed that your comment could very easily be misinterpreted, and not everyone is on the same advanced level as you might be. So its best to not just assume, but actually it is encourage to give your answers as if you may be explaining to someone who isn't familiar with the subject at all, and using examples and explaining as clearly as possible are excellent way to do this, and usually can be most appreciated.

As for trying to prove you wrong, I do then appologize, as that was not my intentions. I only wished for it to be acknowledged, that a Chromebook, regardless of the year, then and now, in no way has the ability to utilise any Windows rooting tool. I did not state this to offend any one. It was only to contribute a very descriptive and detailed body of information, ensuring that the difference between windows executable files and that of Androids are to be both known and understood, to avoid anyone's time being wasted on a task or and idea that would get them nowhere.

It is necessary to do this, as for the chance an unknowingly individual may come across this thread, looking for answers similar to the question at hand. As you should know, even "old topics" should be rectified as such. Unless in the event they are to be removed, locked or relocated to a more appropriate forum.

The only thing here I believe to be irrelevant, is that you felt inclined to point out what I had already stated and took into consideration. So again, that way it is clear, I would just like to point out... that regardless of the year, whether it be 4 years ago, 4 months ago, or whether it be today. I amend the information I provided, and consider it to not only be "relevant" but I hope it proves to be useful and potential prevent or deter someone who would have been then proceeding to inquire about how to run "Windows rooting tools" on a chromebook.
 
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