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So I'm Upgrading From Pixel 4a(5G) To 5a(5G)...

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evnStevn

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Feb 21, 2015
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Google Pixel 6
I'm going in...and have committed to Google's Newest (for now) offering, mainly, due to my ADHD/OCD advisement and my current Pixel is pretty much taken care of thanks to the
platform offered by our great allies @ SWAPPA!

Given the purported IP67 rating & considerably larger power-source over the 4a(5G), I'm fully aware of the fact these two handsets are damn near twins, I decided not long ago I wouldn't be a Pixel 6 taker(when/if offered this fall).

As always, comments, opinions, and yes, even some fun ridicule are always welcomed!😭

Stay clear of the delta variant, & safe journeys!
 

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bubbyj

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2015
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To each their own.

But I can't force myself to pay $450 for an 18% larger battery. Considering that my current rooted Pixel with custom rom and excellent tuning will last through the entire day 100% of the time. The 15% brighter screen, coupled with 1/4" larger size, and 65,000 more pixels, and a 50% faster refresh -- will absolutely cancel out any increase in battery size, and then some. Its SOT time will suffer considerably, and almost certainly be worse than 4a 5g. Then there's the 30w charging. Supposedly the Pixel 4a 5g tops out at 18w. But this is demonstrably false. My own charging maxes out at nearly 27w. 9v @ 2850mah. So again, this is of zero benefit. The 10% faster charge rate would still require about 10% longer to charge with the larger battery... that again, would likely discharge at a much faster rate than the 4a 5g. IP67 is nice, but again... its not worth $400. Especially considering that I can literally throw my current Pixel 4a 5g into the ocean... twice... and just buy 'new' ones for less money. :-/

I mean, if it had the new Tensor cpu... and a ultra premium camera, rather than the same 12.2mp thats been in it for the last 4 years. Some cool new features like under display front camera and fingerprint.

But its literally the same effin phone. Google is now following the same identical business model as Apple. Upgrades that aren't -- well... upgrades.

The biggest change between the 4a and 5a? the 4 and the 5 in the model number. Its disgusting to me.

Do you really not have anything better to spend your $450 on?? I mean, thats a years worth of car insurance. Or 2 car payments. Or Rent. Or 6 escort services. Or a weekend in Vegas. Or 4 pixel 4a 5g's off craigslist that youd set on fire and record it in 4k while playing Freebird in the background.
 

evnStevn

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2015
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Google Pixel 6
To each their own.

But I can't force myself to pay $450 for an 18% larger battery. Considering that my current rooted Pixel with custom rom and excellent tuning will last through the entire day 100% of the time. The 15% brighter screen, coupled with 1/4" larger size, and 65,000 more pixels, and a 50% faster refresh -- will absolutely cancel out any increase in battery size, and then some. Its SOT time will suffer considerably, and almost certainly be worse than 4a 5g. Then there's the 30w charging. Supposedly the Pixel 4a 5g tops out at 18w. But this is demonstrably false. My own charging maxes out at nearly 27w. 9v @ 2850mah. So again, this is of zero benefit. The 10% faster charge rate would still require about 10% longer to charge with the larger battery... that again, would likely discharge at a much faster rate than the 4a 5g. IP67 is nice, but again... its not worth $400. Especially considering that I can literally throw my current Pixel 4a 5g into the ocean... twice... and just buy 'new' ones for less money. :-/

I mean, if it had the new Tensor cpu... and a ultra premium camera, rather than the same 12.2mp thats been in it for the last 4 years. Some cool new features like under display front camera and fingerprint.

But its literally the same effin phone. Google is now following the same identical business model as Apple. Upgrades that aren't -- well... upgrades.

The biggest change between the 4a and 5a? the 4 and the 5 in the model number. Its disgusting to me.

Do you really not have anything better to spend your $450 on?? I mean, thats a years worth of car insurance. Or 2 car payments. Or Rent. Or 6 escort services. Or a weekend in Vegas. Or 4 pixel 4a 5g's off craigslist that youd set on fire and record it in 4k while playing Freebird in the background.
Right On!👍
 

killchain

Senior Member
Oct 6, 2012
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Google Pixel 4a 5G
My thoughts are that the 5a 5G is what the 4a 5G should've been to begin with (but of course that would've made it too similar to the 5 at the time of release). I'm happy with my 4a 5G and at the same time a little bummed that I needed a phone urgently three months ago and got that. I might consider a Pixel 6 Pro after some months.
 
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evnStevn

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Feb 21, 2015
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Google Pixel 6
My thoughts are that the 5a 5G is what the 4a 5G should've been to begin with (but of course that would've made it too similar to the 5 at the time of release). I'm happy with my 4a 5G and at the same time a little bummed that I needed a phone urgently three months ago and got that. I might consider a Pixel 6 Pro after some months.
Yeah, I feel you on that, kinda going through that myself but decided not to purchase either.
For one, the Pixel 6 isn't really a choice, right?! Not too many folks are going to buy a new handset that's playing second string. I noticed immediately when I started looking, the 256 & 512gb P6P's we're already gone, just the 128gb's stg. we're left. What's more, the P6 had the 256 & 128gb's on hand, but then the slower/lower display refresh rate and reduced RAM (<2gb) kinda talk you out of it. The P6P's we're definitely Google's choice for new buyers, as I noticed their Google store site was all centered around the Big Gun, and that's just marketing. You had to do a little digging around the site to find a P6 to send to your cart, whereas google.had the device comparison all set-up when you selected their choice, or the P6P model! No freebies, neither, that hit me right from the start....no $10.00 off your order like I had when purchasing my P5a.

I'm not gonna spring for neither at the present, but will keep an eye on their new SoC, Tensor, to see how it performs and such. It's kinda like when you're out shopping for a new ride and you see a new model & it's one you like, but then that old school rule of thumb kicks in to remind 'ya don't buy it if there's a major component change (like the engine, etc) & it's in it's model year? Sorry for rambling, but believe it or not this was my mindset, and helped me to decide to wait this one out, at least for the time being.🤔
 
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V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Some people just have to have the latest and greatest, regardless of what improvement it might bring them. Kinda like the iStuff folks. I like the idea of assessing cost vs benefit - like how much money are you spending for what sort of difference. I bought my Pixel 2 after it had already been out for a year, and used that until I upgraded to the Pixel 5 earlier this year...and only because the battery was showing its age. I won't be upgrading to the 6, and the only reason why I got the 5 over the 4a was because I wanted a bigger battery. If the 4a 5g were still in stock, I'd get one for my wife to replace her Pixel 3.

Who knows, now that the 6 is out, we might see a price cut on the older devices?
 

bubbyj

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2015
119
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Some people just have to have the latest and greatest, regardless of what improvement it might bring them. Kinda like the iStuff folks. I like the idea of assessing cost vs benefit - like how much money are you spending for what sort of difference. I bought my Pixel 2 after it had already been out for a year, and used that until I upgraded to the Pixel 5 earlier this year...and only because the battery was showing its age. I won't be upgrading to the 6, and the only reason why I got the 5 over the 4a was because I wanted a bigger battery. If the 4a 5g were still in stock, I'd get one for my wife to replace her Pixel 3.

Who knows, now that the 6 is out, we might see a price cut on the older devices?

I'm with ya buddy. As you can see, I stated the same identical thing in an earlier post here. Pixel took a page from the iPhone handbook and made it their own. An upgrade that's not an upgrade. Changing the name of a device is not an upgrade.
 

V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
I'm with ya buddy. As you can see, I stated the same identical thing in an earlier post here. Pixel took a page from the iPhone handbook and made it their own. An upgrade that's not an upgrade. Changing the name of a device is not an upgrade.
I would disagree. The Pixel 6 / 6 Pro are kinda revolutionary in the sense that they're on the Tensor SoC platform whereas all Pixel and Nexus devices since the Nexus 4 in 2012 have used Qualcomm Snapdragon. This is Google's first venture using in-house designed hardware, although the Tensor is quite similar to the Exynos platform. The Tensor makes some compromises to accommodate the TPU, so it seems like Google is investing a lot in AI hardware; both the SD888 and Exynos 2100 easily outperform so it will be interesting to see what happens with the next generation.

But, I can see your point on the upgrade perspective; it's worth noting that the Nexus/Pixel line has never exactly been cutting edge. Google has typically opted for mid-range processors in most devices. I think the purpose of the Pixel line really is aimed at the "Google experience" - Android more or less in its native form, with the Google suite fully integrated. You can certainly make the argument that this has been Apple's model for quite some time, but it obviously works - people keep buying iStuff with the latest number even though it looks and performs pretty much the same as the previous generation.
 
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robocopvn

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Aug 9, 2012
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Sai Gon
Was so confusing considering buying either the 4a 5G or 5a 5G. And I ended up with the Pixel 4a 5g, just for the google photos unlimited backup
 

bubbyj

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2015
119
94
I would disagree. The Pixel 6 / 6 Pro are kinda revolutionary in the sense that they're on the Tensor SoC platform whereas all Pixel and Nexus devices since the Nexus 4 in 2012 have used Qualcomm Snapdragon. This is Google's first venture using in-house designed hardware, although the Tensor is quite similar to the Exynos platform. The Tensor makes some compromises to accommodate the TPU, so it seems like Google is investing a lot in AI hardware; both the SD888 and Exynos 2100 easily outperform so it will be interesting to see what happens with the next generation.

But, I can see your point on the upgrade perspective; it's worth noting that the Nexus/Pixel line has never exactly been cutting edge. Google has typically opted for mid-range processors in most devices. I think the purpose of the Pixel line really is aimed at the "Google experience" - Android more or less in its native form, with the Google suite fully integrated. You can certainly make the argument that this has been Apple's model for quite some time, but it obviously works - people keep buying iStuff with the latest number even though it looks and performs pretty much the same as the previous generation.

You're not disagreeing at all *with me*. Because I made no such statement -- that the Pixel 6/Pro wasn't an upgrade over the older phones.

In fact, we are in full agreement --- the Pixel 6 and Pro are among the best phones ever made IMO. The camera alone is revolutionary. The new 50mp 4/1 binned camera is the best in the business at this very moment. Couple that with the Tensor and its AI computing, mixed with the Gcam's computational photography core... Nothing even comes close. A huge battery, with a 5nm process.... its just a beautiful device inside and out.

But again, I never made a single comment regarding the Pixel 6/pro. The OP/title is discussing the Pixel 4a 5g vs the Pixel 5a.

My post is discussing the 4a 5g vs 5a, as well.

I'm not sure how anyone could confuse that.

With the 5a, my post and statement still stand strong. Its an 'upgrade' in name only. And google appears to be exploiting name changes as upgrades, much like the cult of iWhatever.

There's literally no difference between an 8 and 10.
-same main camera 12mp dual pixel
-same selfie camera 7mp
-same battery 2700mah
-same processor A11
-same gpu Tri-Core Bionic
-same ram 3gb
-same storage 64/128/256
-same ssd type (NVMe)
-same cell bands (4g LTE)
-same wifi adapter (a/b/g/n/ac 2.4 and 5, no 6)
-same essential size (5.5" vs 5.7")

The only 2 and real differences:
-the iPhone 8 scores HIGHER on GeekBench!!
-the identical iPhone X was $300 more at $999 vs $699 for the iPhone 8.

This is nothing short of delusional and psychotic. $300 for a name change, and a 3% bigger screen, and a 4% drop in benchmark scores.

The pixel 5a is exactly the same scenario. Its benchmark scores are actually fractionally lower. And nothing else is really different. Its battery life is essentially the same as the 4a5g, even though its bigger... due to its fractionally larger and brighter screen.

Its fraudulent. And everybody should be able to recognize this. Those that don't, likely deserve the abuse.
 
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V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
You're not disagreeing at all *with me*. Because I made no such statement -- that the Pixel 6/Pro wasn't an upgrade over the older phones.

In fact, we are in full agreement --- the Pixel 6 and Pro are among the best phones ever made IMO. The camera alone is revolutionary. The new 50mp 4/1 binned camera is the best in the business at this very moment. Couple that with the Tensor and its AI computing, mixed with the Gcam's computational photography core... Nothing even comes close. A huge battery, with a 5nm process.... its just a beautiful device inside and out.

But again, I never made a single comment regarding the Pixel 6/pro. The OP/title is discussing the Pixel 4a 5g vs the Pixel 5a.

My post is discussing the 4a 5g vs 5a, as well.

I'm not sure how anyone could confuse that.

With the 5a, my post and statement still stand strong. Its an 'upgrade' in name only. And google appears to be exploiting name changes as upgrades, much like the cult of iWhatever.
The Pixel "a" series has always been intended as a "budget" alternative via compromises on hardware and storage. The 4a 5G and 5a are almost identical - they both use the SD765G, same as the Pixel 5. The biggest differences are the 5a is slightly bigger and has a much larger battery. So in that sense, I suppose I could agree with you - the only way a 5a would be an upgrade over the 4a 5g would be battery life. Kind of an odd marketing strategy if you ask me; the 4a 5g could have easily been the 5a, and the 5a could have just had the same hardware as the 5 and become the 5XL.
There's literally no difference between an 8 and 10.
-same main camera 12mp dual pixel
-same selfie camera 7mp
-same battery 2700mah
-same processor A11
-same gpu Tri-Core Bionic
-same ram 3gb
-same storage 64/128/256
-same ssd type (NVMe)
-same cell bands (4g LTE)
-same wifi adapter (a/b/g/n/ac 2.4 and 5, no 6)
-same essential size (5.5" vs 5.7")

The only 2 and real differences:
-the iPhone 8 scores HIGHER on GeekBench!!
-the identical iPhone X was $300 more at $999 vs $699 for the iPhone 8.

This is nothing short of delusional and psychotic. $300 for a name change, and a 3% bigger screen, and a 4% drop in benchmark scores.

The pixel 5a is exactly the same scenario. Its benchmark scores are actually fractionally lower. And nothing else is really different. Its battery life is essentially the same as the 4a5g, even though its bigger... due to its 90hz and brighter screen.

Its fraudulent. And everybody should be able to recognize this. Those that don't, likely deserve the abuse.
I'm not sure I would go so far as to decry this as "fraudulent" or "abuse". Generation wise, the Pixel a has always come after the namesake model. I do consider it odd that there's both a 4a and a 4a (5G), with different hardware, and they were only released 3 months apart; it almost seems like Google could have just gone with the 4/4XL, 4a, then the 5 and 5a.

And, with the Pixel 6/6 Pro having identical CPUs but nearly double the RAM and definitely double the storage on the Pro....it does kinda seem like they're going Apple.

But, people still buy it. I've always considered the iStuff model a ripoff too and if Google does the same thing, it'll still be a ripoff. But, they will keep doing it because people will keep buying the phones. Including myself. Though I'll probably wait a bit longer before I upgrade again. I came to the Pixel 5 from the 2.
 

bubbyj

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2015
119
94
Was so confusing considering buying either the 4a 5G or 5a 5G. And I ended up with the Pixel 4a 5g, just for the google photos unlimited backup
Good call. I've found 4a 5g's on the used (and perfect condition) market for $150.

The 5a 5g has been a huge bust for Google too.

when the 4a 5g came out, it was obviously the deal of a lifetime. You essential got a Pixel 5 for half the price. The only real differences are the IP68 rating, a metal frame, and 90hz display.

The 8% larger battery is more than eaten up by the 50% faster display refresh on the Pixel 5.

So the Pixel 4a 5g was an amazing deal upon introduction. But considering you can get Pixel 5's for $250 on the used market today, anyone who would spend $500 on a 5a is glutten for punishment.

Sadly, the 6a rumor mills are in universal agreement -- it'll use the same 12.2mp IMX 363 main camera as every pixel has used since #2 was released. Which in itself isn't necessarily a *bad* thing. But its tired. And should be REtired.

The 6a should be coming with the 50mp sensor.

I'm a camera guy and make my living as a photographer. I exclusively use the Pixel 4a 5g as my camera, which blows most people's mind -- as they often use $2000+ DSLR camera's. The fact that I can do everything they can with a cheap phone, is just unheard of.

In fact, I created cost/effectiveness ratio's of today's leading phones. The gold standard for benchmarking camera's is the legendary dxoMark score. It takes about a dozen benchmarks into consideration and creates a single score using their proprietary formula. Here is a list of my c/e ratio's (LOWER IS BETTER, scored as dollar per 1 point)

Galaxy S21 Ultra: 121 @ $1200 $ 9.91
Galaxy zFold 3: 124 @ $1800 $14.52
iPhone XS Max: 106 @ $1100 $10.38
xPeria 1 III: 114 @ $1300 $11.41
Google Pixel 5: 120 @ $700 $ 5.83
One Plus 9 Pro: 124 @ $970 $ 7.82
Iphone 13 Max: 137 @ $1100 $ 8.03

And then....

GOOGLE PIXEL 4A 5G 120 @ 350 $ 2.91

While I realize that the camera isn't the only thing that people look for in a phone. CPU's are super important. Pixels per inch. Battery size.

But the great fact of phones is this and nothing less: The average phone buyer is NOT a power user. They take selfies, stalk on facebook, check email, send texts, watch netlfix/porn, and maybe listen to some music. Which means 90% of users can literally tell ZERO difference between using an iphone 13 pro and a samsung a12. I mean, having the facebook app open in 0.8 seconds vs 1.1 seconds is the biggest difference between the two phones and uses.

The 5a and the 4a5 literally have the same capabilities, at the same speeds, with the same results, and same user experience. Its highway robbery.
 

bubbyj

Senior Member
Dec 31, 2015
119
94
The Pixel "a" series has always been intended as a "budget" alternative via compromises on hardware and storage. The 4a 5G and 5a are almost identical - they both use the SD765G, same as the Pixel 5. The biggest differences are the 5a is slightly bigger and has a much larger battery. So in that sense, I suppose I could agree with you - the only way a 5a would be an upgrade over the 4a 5g would be battery life. Kind of an odd marketing strategy if you ask me; the 4a 5g could have easily been the 5a, and the 5a could have just had the same hardware as the 5 and become the 5XL.

I'm not sure I would go so far as to decry this as "fraudulent" or "abuse". Generation wise, the Pixel a has always come after the namesake model. I do consider it odd that there's both a 4a and a 4a (5G), with different hardware, and they were only released 3 months apart; it almost seems like Google could have just gone with the 4/4XL, 4a, then the 5 and 5a.

And, with the Pixel 6/6 Pro having identical CPUs but nearly double the RAM and definitely double the storage on the Pro....it does kinda seem like they're going Apple.

But, people still buy it. I've always considered the iStuff model a ripoff too and if Google does the same thing, it'll still be a ripoff. But, they will keep doing it because people will keep buying the phones. Including myself. Though I'll probably wait a bit longer before I upgrade again. I came to the Pixel 5 from the 2.

As I pointed out earlier the 'much larger battery' is a fraudulent claim. Its larger in 'name only'.

Youtube has multiple videos of the 4a 5g, the 5a, and the 5 going head to head on battery life tests. The one that I watched in full shows that the pixel 5a is at 5% at the moment the 4a 5g shuts down. They are using the same battery drain test app, with the screen brightest adjusted to the same level. Whats most interesting about this test is that the pixel 5a is freshly unboxed and has a 100% new and unused battery. So it hasn't lost any of its charging abilities. The user states that the Pixel 4a 5g used in the test has 7 months worth of daily drains and recharges. Likely over 200 charging cycles. According to all available information, 5% battery life is lost per 100 charges. So its safe to say that Pixel 4a5 used has about 90% life at this point. Meaning, a fresh 4a5 will likely perform equally or better than the 5a because of its 65k less pixels, and 10-12% dimmer screen at max brightness. So that perk/plus is out the window. The larger battery is simply to compensate for its faster burn rate.

To repeat and beat an already dead horse... The 4a5 and the 5a are basically the same phones with different names printed on them. The 6 and the Pro however are vastly different, with major and awesome upgrades between the two -- fully justifying the 'pro moniker'.

1)Pro has a MAJOR screen upgrade. It goes from a 2400x1080 screen to a 3120x1440p. Thats the difference between 4.5 million pixels and 2.5 million pixels. A nearly 100% increase in resolution. The difference is palpable. And your eyes are immediately turned onto it.
2)Pro has a 33% faster frame rate. 120hz, vs just a 60-90hz variable rate for the 6. Scrolling feels like another entire world when you compare the two. The 6's GPU will support hundreds of frames per second with many of todays graphically intense games... but the screen will only show 60 of those frames for most games (as they aren't built for variable hz rates) and even if they are, it'll only show 90fps at the very best due to the screen limitations. The Pro, however, will show 120fps. Again, its like you're in another world. Anyone who thinks you can't tell the difference, i urge them to swap between 30fps and 60fps on their google camera app... you'll never ever go back to 30fps again, because the difference is THAT profound. Truly.
3)Pro has a 3rd and absolutely incredible camera -- the first telephoto camera in the google lineup. This provides 4x optical zoom. Optical zoom loses ZERO resolution and quality for the 1st 4x zoom. Couple this with the super resolution function of dual pixel technology, the tensor's AI, and google camera's superior computational core --- you can literally zoom up to 10-12x on this camera without a single visual loss of resolution. Its incredible.
4)Pro has a VASTLY upgraded selfie camera. With 40% more resolution, much larger pixel size for increased light intake and color contrast output... the difference is night and day. In fact, its self camera rivals the main sensors on most any other phone on the market.
5)Pro has a >5000mah battery.
6)Pro has 50% more RAM. But not just 'more'... its also 33% faster with its bandwidth and the actual processing of memory.
7)Pro has 25% more Pixels per inch, 2x more color contrast, and 10% brighter screen.
8)Pro has mmWave and Ultrawide band on ALL models. The 6 requires an upgrade to the "mmWave UW" model to achieve this.
9)Pro has a half terabyte model, not avaialble on the 6.

Now... can you see why this isn't apple "upgrades"??

But when you compare the 4a5 and the 5a.... I'd literally be typingj 1)same, 2)same, 3)same, 4)same, etc.
 

evnStevn

Senior Member
Feb 21, 2015
217
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Google Pixel 6
I would disagree. The Pixel 6 / 6 Pro are kinda revolutionary in the sense that they're on the Tensor SoC platform whereas all Pixel and Nexus devices since the Nexus 4 in 2012 have used Qualcomm Snapdragon. This is Google's first venture using in-house designed hardware, although the Tensor is quite similar to the Exynos platform. The Tensor makes some compromises to accommodate the TPU, so it seems like Google is investing a lot in AI hardware; both the SD888 and Exynos 2100 easily outperform so it will be interesting to see what happens with the next generation.

But, I can see your point on the upgrade perspective; it's worth noting that the Nexus/Pixel line has never exactly been cutting edge. Google has typically opted for mid-range processors in most devices. I think the purpose of the Pixel line really is aimed at the "Google experience" - Android more or less in its native form, with the Google suite fully integrated. You can certainly make the argument that this has been Apple's model for quite some time, but it obviously works - people keep buying iStuff with the latest number even though it looks and performs pretty much the same as the previous generation.
I tend to agree...the only thing I would add is it seemed just a short while ago Google was pulling away from Samsung and beginning to go their own way and then came the Tensor, which we know Google asked the monopolizing conglomerate, Samsung for some pointers, etc., and a handshake later, maybe a partner?! Don't get me wrong, since abandoning ship (uh, that's Samsung's Flag-ship), one of the things that no price tag could cure was having 2 apps (1 Google & 1 Samsung) for everyday usage stuff tho I prefer "Native Android" too in lieu of Google! My handset isn't bogged.down with as much bloatware and when scrolling my app drawer I DON'T SEE, total apps on device=507!
And my point's in here somewhere, I promise, and Google, I get it, why take a huge risk to totally reinvent the wheel if it's not necessary but then are we gonna see the same dropoff from customer goodwill from Google as some saw from Samsung, (i.e., everyone remembers where it all started) with the Note 7 debaucle?! When Samsung finished, and tied a neat little bow on it, several thousand (dare I say million) of us were left holding our "junk" in one hand & the Galaxy Note 7 FE (fan edition, yeah which, btw, I offered up to them, hey guys let's call it: Galaxy Note 7 FS, you know for Fuc#'s Sake...no takers on that one)!🤔
Let's hope/pray Google with it's latest Flagship challenge, decide to hold fast to a higher customer goodwill standard so not as to mirror the outcome that their "new" S.Korean SOc chipset partners had. Sorry I turned my "reply/add to" into the makings of a sound-off platform, God forbid. smh
evnStevn
p.s..dammit man, I know better, but Is it just me, or does anyone else see a striking resemblance with the new Pixel line and the historical Galaxy S10 series, forgoing the huge camera bump? It might be these old eyes, idk
 
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V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
I tend to agree...the only thing I would add is it seemed just a short while ago Google was pulling away from Samsung and beginning to go their own way and then the Tensor which admittedly Samsung is their partner on this?! Don't get me wrong, since abandoning ship (uh, that's Samsung's Flag-ship), one of the things that no price tag could cure was having 2 apps (1 Google & 1 Samsung) for everyday usage stuff tho I prefer "Native Android" too in lieu of Google! My handset isn't bogged.down with as much bloatware and when scrolling my app drawer I DON'T SEE total apps on device=507🤔
And my point's in here somewhere, I promise, and Google, I get it, why take a huge risk to totally reinvent the wheel if it's not necessary but then are we gonna see the same dropoff from customer goodwill from Google as some saw from Samsung, (i.e., everyone remembers where it all started) with the Note 7 debaucle?! When Samsung finished, and tied a neat little bow on it, several thousand (dare I say million) of us were left holding our "junk" in one hand & the Galaxy Note 7 FE (fan edition, yeah which, btw, I offered up to them, hey guys let's call it: Galaxy Note 7 FS, you know for Fuc#'s Sake...no takers on that one)!🤔
Let's hope/pray Google with it's latest Flagship challenge, decide to hold fast to a higher customer goodwill standard so not as to mirror the outcome that their "new" S.Korean SOc chipset partners had. Sorry I turned my "reply/add to" into the makings of a sound-off platform, God forbid. smh
evnStevn
For sure. Samsung is one of the worst offenders with bloatware. My opinion on hardware as well as operating systems is thus: Allow users to have the freedom to choose whatever cloud integration they want. Samsung is trying their damnedest to break into cloud services and AI like Google, but I can't say I have ever been particularly impressed with anything they've had to offer. Besides, people like convenience - most users would rather have "One Account - One Google" instead of having to have a Samsung account, a Verizon account, etc. It's one thing to have the option - it's another entirely to have everything default to one option, and to try to discourage users from using competitors' options.

Microsoft is particularly bad at this with Edge. I prefer Google, including Chrome, for most of my services...simply from a perspective of convenience. They've done a pretty good job of streamlining everything. But, Microsoft has been particularly insistent on use of Edge...even for enterprise platforms (I use Windows 10 LTSC). When I changed the default browser, Windows was like "But have you tried Edge?" Nope, don't want it. "Are you SURE?" Yep. I'm sure. "Okay, we're going to install it for you anyway, and every once in a while we'll ask you again just in case you change your mind."

Yeah, no. I'm a stubborn old mule. The more someone tries to convince me to do something, the less likely I am to even consider it. And if I've made my decision yet you pester me anyway, I'm DEFINITELY not going to change my answer.
 
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evnStevn

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Feb 21, 2015
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Inverness
Google Pixel 6
and did Microsoft put those fake Chrome browser links out there to fool folks when trying to download their favorite and best established browser...how dare I suggest such a thing?!🤔 Preposterous!!
 

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  • 1
    I'm with ya buddy. As you can see, I stated the same identical thing in an earlier post here. Pixel took a page from the iPhone handbook and made it their own. An upgrade that's not an upgrade. Changing the name of a device is not an upgrade.
    I would disagree. The Pixel 6 / 6 Pro are kinda revolutionary in the sense that they're on the Tensor SoC platform whereas all Pixel and Nexus devices since the Nexus 4 in 2012 have used Qualcomm Snapdragon. This is Google's first venture using in-house designed hardware, although the Tensor is quite similar to the Exynos platform. The Tensor makes some compromises to accommodate the TPU, so it seems like Google is investing a lot in AI hardware; both the SD888 and Exynos 2100 easily outperform so it will be interesting to see what happens with the next generation.

    But, I can see your point on the upgrade perspective; it's worth noting that the Nexus/Pixel line has never exactly been cutting edge. Google has typically opted for mid-range processors in most devices. I think the purpose of the Pixel line really is aimed at the "Google experience" - Android more or less in its native form, with the Google suite fully integrated. You can certainly make the argument that this has been Apple's model for quite some time, but it obviously works - people keep buying iStuff with the latest number even though it looks and performs pretty much the same as the previous generation.
    1
    I would disagree. The Pixel 6 / 6 Pro are kinda revolutionary in the sense that they're on the Tensor SoC platform whereas all Pixel and Nexus devices since the Nexus 4 in 2012 have used Qualcomm Snapdragon. This is Google's first venture using in-house designed hardware, although the Tensor is quite similar to the Exynos platform. The Tensor makes some compromises to accommodate the TPU, so it seems like Google is investing a lot in AI hardware; both the SD888 and Exynos 2100 easily outperform so it will be interesting to see what happens with the next generation.

    But, I can see your point on the upgrade perspective; it's worth noting that the Nexus/Pixel line has never exactly been cutting edge. Google has typically opted for mid-range processors in most devices. I think the purpose of the Pixel line really is aimed at the "Google experience" - Android more or less in its native form, with the Google suite fully integrated. You can certainly make the argument that this has been Apple's model for quite some time, but it obviously works - people keep buying iStuff with the latest number even though it looks and performs pretty much the same as the previous generation.
    I tend to agree...the only thing I would add is it seemed just a short while ago Google was pulling away from Samsung and beginning to go their own way and then came the Tensor, which we know Google asked the monopolizing conglomerate, Samsung for some pointers, etc., and a handshake later, maybe a partner?! Don't get me wrong, since abandoning ship (uh, that's Samsung's Flag-ship), one of the things that no price tag could cure was having 2 apps (1 Google & 1 Samsung) for everyday usage stuff tho I prefer "Native Android" too in lieu of Google! My handset isn't bogged.down with as much bloatware and when scrolling my app drawer I DON'T SEE, total apps on device=507!
    And my point's in here somewhere, I promise, and Google, I get it, why take a huge risk to totally reinvent the wheel if it's not necessary but then are we gonna see the same dropoff from customer goodwill from Google as some saw from Samsung, (i.e., everyone remembers where it all started) with the Note 7 debaucle?! When Samsung finished, and tied a neat little bow on it, several thousand (dare I say million) of us were left holding our "junk" in one hand & the Galaxy Note 7 FE (fan edition, yeah which, btw, I offered up to them, hey guys let's call it: Galaxy Note 7 FS, you know for Fuc#'s Sake...no takers on that one)!🤔
    Let's hope/pray Google with it's latest Flagship challenge, decide to hold fast to a higher customer goodwill standard so not as to mirror the outcome that their "new" S.Korean SOc chipset partners had. Sorry I turned my "reply/add to" into the makings of a sound-off platform, God forbid. smh
    evnStevn
    p.s..dammit man, I know better, but Is it just me, or does anyone else see a striking resemblance with the new Pixel line and the historical Galaxy S10 series, forgoing the huge camera bump? It might be these old eyes, idk
    1
    I tend to agree...the only thing I would add is it seemed just a short while ago Google was pulling away from Samsung and beginning to go their own way and then the Tensor which admittedly Samsung is their partner on this?! Don't get me wrong, since abandoning ship (uh, that's Samsung's Flag-ship), one of the things that no price tag could cure was having 2 apps (1 Google & 1 Samsung) for everyday usage stuff tho I prefer "Native Android" too in lieu of Google! My handset isn't bogged.down with as much bloatware and when scrolling my app drawer I DON'T SEE total apps on device=507🤔
    And my point's in here somewhere, I promise, and Google, I get it, why take a huge risk to totally reinvent the wheel if it's not necessary but then are we gonna see the same dropoff from customer goodwill from Google as some saw from Samsung, (i.e., everyone remembers where it all started) with the Note 7 debaucle?! When Samsung finished, and tied a neat little bow on it, several thousand (dare I say million) of us were left holding our "junk" in one hand & the Galaxy Note 7 FE (fan edition, yeah which, btw, I offered up to them, hey guys let's call it: Galaxy Note 7 FS, you know for Fuc#'s Sake...no takers on that one)!🤔
    Let's hope/pray Google with it's latest Flagship challenge, decide to hold fast to a higher customer goodwill standard so not as to mirror the outcome that their "new" S.Korean SOc chipset partners had. Sorry I turned my "reply/add to" into the makings of a sound-off platform, God forbid. smh
    evnStevn
    For sure. Samsung is one of the worst offenders with bloatware. My opinion on hardware as well as operating systems is thus: Allow users to have the freedom to choose whatever cloud integration they want. Samsung is trying their damnedest to break into cloud services and AI like Google, but I can't say I have ever been particularly impressed with anything they've had to offer. Besides, people like convenience - most users would rather have "One Account - One Google" instead of having to have a Samsung account, a Verizon account, etc. It's one thing to have the option - it's another entirely to have everything default to one option, and to try to discourage users from using competitors' options.

    Microsoft is particularly bad at this with Edge. I prefer Google, including Chrome, for most of my services...simply from a perspective of convenience. They've done a pretty good job of streamlining everything. But, Microsoft has been particularly insistent on use of Edge...even for enterprise platforms (I use Windows 10 LTSC). When I changed the default browser, Windows was like "But have you tried Edge?" Nope, don't want it. "Are you SURE?" Yep. I'm sure. "Okay, we're going to install it for you anyway, and every once in a while we'll ask you again just in case you change your mind."

    Yeah, no. I'm a stubborn old mule. The more someone tries to convince me to do something, the less likely I am to even consider it. And if I've made my decision yet you pester me anyway, I'm DEFINITELY not going to change my answer.
  • 2
    To each their own.

    But I can't force myself to pay $450 for an 18% larger battery. Considering that my current rooted Pixel with custom rom and excellent tuning will last through the entire day 100% of the time. The 15% brighter screen, coupled with 1/4" larger size, and 65,000 more pixels, and a 50% faster refresh -- will absolutely cancel out any increase in battery size, and then some. Its SOT time will suffer considerably, and almost certainly be worse than 4a 5g. Then there's the 30w charging. Supposedly the Pixel 4a 5g tops out at 18w. But this is demonstrably false. My own charging maxes out at nearly 27w. 9v @ 2850mah. So again, this is of zero benefit. The 10% faster charge rate would still require about 10% longer to charge with the larger battery... that again, would likely discharge at a much faster rate than the 4a 5g. IP67 is nice, but again... its not worth $400. Especially considering that I can literally throw my current Pixel 4a 5g into the ocean... twice... and just buy 'new' ones for less money. :-/

    I mean, if it had the new Tensor cpu... and a ultra premium camera, rather than the same 12.2mp thats been in it for the last 4 years. Some cool new features like under display front camera and fingerprint.

    But its literally the same effin phone. Google is now following the same identical business model as Apple. Upgrades that aren't -- well... upgrades.

    The biggest change between the 4a and 5a? the 4 and the 5 in the model number. Its disgusting to me.

    Do you really not have anything better to spend your $450 on?? I mean, thats a years worth of car insurance. Or 2 car payments. Or Rent. Or 6 escort services. Or a weekend in Vegas. Or 4 pixel 4a 5g's off craigslist that youd set on fire and record it in 4k while playing Freebird in the background.
    1
    My thoughts are that the 5a 5G is what the 4a 5G should've been to begin with (but of course that would've made it too similar to the 5 at the time of release). I'm happy with my 4a 5G and at the same time a little bummed that I needed a phone urgently three months ago and got that. I might consider a Pixel 6 Pro after some months.
    1
    I'm with ya buddy. As you can see, I stated the same identical thing in an earlier post here. Pixel took a page from the iPhone handbook and made it their own. An upgrade that's not an upgrade. Changing the name of a device is not an upgrade.
    I would disagree. The Pixel 6 / 6 Pro are kinda revolutionary in the sense that they're on the Tensor SoC platform whereas all Pixel and Nexus devices since the Nexus 4 in 2012 have used Qualcomm Snapdragon. This is Google's first venture using in-house designed hardware, although the Tensor is quite similar to the Exynos platform. The Tensor makes some compromises to accommodate the TPU, so it seems like Google is investing a lot in AI hardware; both the SD888 and Exynos 2100 easily outperform so it will be interesting to see what happens with the next generation.

    But, I can see your point on the upgrade perspective; it's worth noting that the Nexus/Pixel line has never exactly been cutting edge. Google has typically opted for mid-range processors in most devices. I think the purpose of the Pixel line really is aimed at the "Google experience" - Android more or less in its native form, with the Google suite fully integrated. You can certainly make the argument that this has been Apple's model for quite some time, but it obviously works - people keep buying iStuff with the latest number even though it looks and performs pretty much the same as the previous generation.
    1
    I would disagree. The Pixel 6 / 6 Pro are kinda revolutionary in the sense that they're on the Tensor SoC platform whereas all Pixel and Nexus devices since the Nexus 4 in 2012 have used Qualcomm Snapdragon. This is Google's first venture using in-house designed hardware, although the Tensor is quite similar to the Exynos platform. The Tensor makes some compromises to accommodate the TPU, so it seems like Google is investing a lot in AI hardware; both the SD888 and Exynos 2100 easily outperform so it will be interesting to see what happens with the next generation.

    But, I can see your point on the upgrade perspective; it's worth noting that the Nexus/Pixel line has never exactly been cutting edge. Google has typically opted for mid-range processors in most devices. I think the purpose of the Pixel line really is aimed at the "Google experience" - Android more or less in its native form, with the Google suite fully integrated. You can certainly make the argument that this has been Apple's model for quite some time, but it obviously works - people keep buying iStuff with the latest number even though it looks and performs pretty much the same as the previous generation.
    I tend to agree...the only thing I would add is it seemed just a short while ago Google was pulling away from Samsung and beginning to go their own way and then came the Tensor, which we know Google asked the monopolizing conglomerate, Samsung for some pointers, etc., and a handshake later, maybe a partner?! Don't get me wrong, since abandoning ship (uh, that's Samsung's Flag-ship), one of the things that no price tag could cure was having 2 apps (1 Google & 1 Samsung) for everyday usage stuff tho I prefer "Native Android" too in lieu of Google! My handset isn't bogged.down with as much bloatware and when scrolling my app drawer I DON'T SEE, total apps on device=507!
    And my point's in here somewhere, I promise, and Google, I get it, why take a huge risk to totally reinvent the wheel if it's not necessary but then are we gonna see the same dropoff from customer goodwill from Google as some saw from Samsung, (i.e., everyone remembers where it all started) with the Note 7 debaucle?! When Samsung finished, and tied a neat little bow on it, several thousand (dare I say million) of us were left holding our "junk" in one hand & the Galaxy Note 7 FE (fan edition, yeah which, btw, I offered up to them, hey guys let's call it: Galaxy Note 7 FS, you know for Fuc#'s Sake...no takers on that one)!🤔
    Let's hope/pray Google with it's latest Flagship challenge, decide to hold fast to a higher customer goodwill standard so not as to mirror the outcome that their "new" S.Korean SOc chipset partners had. Sorry I turned my "reply/add to" into the makings of a sound-off platform, God forbid. smh
    evnStevn
    p.s..dammit man, I know better, but Is it just me, or does anyone else see a striking resemblance with the new Pixel line and the historical Galaxy S10 series, forgoing the huge camera bump? It might be these old eyes, idk
    1
    I tend to agree...the only thing I would add is it seemed just a short while ago Google was pulling away from Samsung and beginning to go their own way and then the Tensor which admittedly Samsung is their partner on this?! Don't get me wrong, since abandoning ship (uh, that's Samsung's Flag-ship), one of the things that no price tag could cure was having 2 apps (1 Google & 1 Samsung) for everyday usage stuff tho I prefer "Native Android" too in lieu of Google! My handset isn't bogged.down with as much bloatware and when scrolling my app drawer I DON'T SEE total apps on device=507🤔
    And my point's in here somewhere, I promise, and Google, I get it, why take a huge risk to totally reinvent the wheel if it's not necessary but then are we gonna see the same dropoff from customer goodwill from Google as some saw from Samsung, (i.e., everyone remembers where it all started) with the Note 7 debaucle?! When Samsung finished, and tied a neat little bow on it, several thousand (dare I say million) of us were left holding our "junk" in one hand & the Galaxy Note 7 FE (fan edition, yeah which, btw, I offered up to them, hey guys let's call it: Galaxy Note 7 FS, you know for Fuc#'s Sake...no takers on that one)!🤔
    Let's hope/pray Google with it's latest Flagship challenge, decide to hold fast to a higher customer goodwill standard so not as to mirror the outcome that their "new" S.Korean SOc chipset partners had. Sorry I turned my "reply/add to" into the makings of a sound-off platform, God forbid. smh
    evnStevn
    For sure. Samsung is one of the worst offenders with bloatware. My opinion on hardware as well as operating systems is thus: Allow users to have the freedom to choose whatever cloud integration they want. Samsung is trying their damnedest to break into cloud services and AI like Google, but I can't say I have ever been particularly impressed with anything they've had to offer. Besides, people like convenience - most users would rather have "One Account - One Google" instead of having to have a Samsung account, a Verizon account, etc. It's one thing to have the option - it's another entirely to have everything default to one option, and to try to discourage users from using competitors' options.

    Microsoft is particularly bad at this with Edge. I prefer Google, including Chrome, for most of my services...simply from a perspective of convenience. They've done a pretty good job of streamlining everything. But, Microsoft has been particularly insistent on use of Edge...even for enterprise platforms (I use Windows 10 LTSC). When I changed the default browser, Windows was like "But have you tried Edge?" Nope, don't want it. "Are you SURE?" Yep. I'm sure. "Okay, we're going to install it for you anyway, and every once in a while we'll ask you again just in case you change your mind."

    Yeah, no. I'm a stubborn old mule. The more someone tries to convince me to do something, the less likely I am to even consider it. And if I've made my decision yet you pester me anyway, I'm DEFINITELY not going to change my answer.