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"This PC can't run Windows 11"

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tweeterxda

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Jul 30, 2020
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Not all CPUs are compatible with that, and not all the manufacturers give the option to enable TPM. Lets bypass it, shall we? Create a new txt file anywhere on your pc and open it. After that, add the following lines:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig] “BypassTPMCheck”=dword:00000001 “BypassSecureBootCheck”=dword:00000001

Save the file, and then rename it, just remove the "txt" and replace it with "reg". Open the file and BOOM. The setup should work.
I have Asus M4A78T-E motherboard with AM3 processor support. Using AMD athlon 64 X2 6000 3.00 GHz processor. Did not see support for the processor on Windows 11 CPU compatibility list. Also did not find TPM feature in my bios under advanced or security. Just password settings. Is there a work around for CPU compatibility too? Please explain what I need to do to get Windows 11 on my PC.
Not all CPUs are compatible with that, and not all the manufacturers give the option to enable TPM. Lets bypass it, shall we? Create a new txt file anywhere on your pc and open it. After that, add the following lines:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig] “BypassTPMCheck”=dword:00000001 “BypassSecureBootCheck”=dword:00000001

Save the file, and then rename it, just remove the "txt" and replace it with "reg". Open the file and BOOM. The setup should work.
 
I pre-copied the registry entries that others posted to note pad as a text doc....I found a good download of the windows 11 build from Android File Host... I created a usb boot disk using refus...I mounted the newly made usb in windows 10...added my new text doc to usb...I booted bios and made sure I was set up for flash drive boot install...i booted windows 11 iso from usb flash...I got the my hardware system incompatible error.... hold shift and f10 to open command prompt... type notepad... notepad opens and chose file from heading and it opens widows file manager...navigate to your flash drive and click on the new text doc made earler...open and save as newcopy change the file extension from .txt to .reg...open the .reg fle you just made and a pop up window updates registry ..click on the still open installer window and hit back button.. it will restart install process... I have a 2012 dell opti desktop with 2nd gen i5 and 8g ram...i have no issues and it runs faster than windows 10 pro...every time i boot i have to manually enable widows security which is only difference...
 
This worked for me....I have an old optiplex 790 with a Intel i5 4 series....all I did was change the registry through the BIOS on the front en I made the ISO file for USB UEFI boot I got the error saying that my machine hardware was not suitable for Windows 11 so I hit shift and F10 to command prompt and entered notepad because I already copied the registry into a text document that's accessible from the file menu in the notepad never done that before and that was pretty cool..copied it and then went back to the command prompt and went to the regedit.exe... copy what I had on the the text document into the actual local registry and then started the install process all over and Golden... I had to actually download the ISO file from Android host file of all places checksum good...
 
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StrangerWeather

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Jul 18, 2012
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That's not correct, I received 11 as an update on my HP with a 7th Generation Intel® Core™ i3 Processor
I think that by "support" they mean that they won't work on bugs that are experienced by older systems. If you look here you will see that they warn users not meeting the hardware requirement that their installation "may result in a degraded experience & some features may not work properly" : https://blogs.windows.com/windows-i...ing-for-insider-preview-builds-of-windows-11/. They don't actually say that it won't work at all.
 

GiulianoB

Senior Member
Feb 27, 2016
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I have Asus M4A78T-E motherboard with AM3 processor support. Using AMD athlon 64 X2 6000 3.00 GHz processor. Did not see support for the processor on Windows 11 CPU compatibility list. Also did not find TPM feature in my bios under advanced or security. Just password settings. Is there a work around for CPU compatibility too? Please explain what I need to do to get Windows 11 on my PC.
I just told you what you need to do. This bypass "doesn't care" what your pc has, and "doesn't care" if you have TPM enabled or not. All you need to do is to follow my instructions, and you will be able to bypass the issue with TPM:
Create a new txt file anywhere on your pc and open it. After that, add the following lines:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig] “BypassTPMCheck”=dword:00000001 “BypassSecureBootCheck”=dword:00000001

When you finish, you start the setup of windows 11, and you won't get an error.
 

[email protected]

Senior Member
Jun 13, 2021
85
67
Samsung Galaxy J1
I think that by "support" they mean that they won't work on bugs that are experienced by older systems. If you look here you will see that they warn users not meeting the hardware requirement that their installation "may result in a degraded experience & some features may not work properly" : https://blogs.windows.com/windows-i...ing-for-insider-preview-builds-of-windows-11/. They don't actually say that it won't work at all.
yes after researching a bit i also come to same conclusion. thanks for info.
 

Rizal Lovins

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May 30, 2012
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well, bad news Microsoft just announced that it will only support Intel 8th generation and above processor line up.

well, we are in XDA so wait till any work around is there
What i mean is only edit registry when you run Windows 11 installer (without change any file from windows 11 bootable image), and i just try it and succes, so the conclusion is we don't need any modified bootable Windows 11, everyone can run it easily.

So far there is no issue on my laptop, but i make it 2nd bootable (dual boot) just to try Windows 11 and all my current Driver, i'd like it more than Windows 10, the only problem that i facing is microsoft project 2019 and visio 2019 didn't appear on the list app, other Office work fine.
 

mindlery

Senior Member
May 1, 2018
428
101
Calgary
To run Windows 11 on old hardware, you need to copy all the files from the Sources folder from the Windows 10 ISO except for "install.wim" or "install.esd" to the Sources folder of the Windows 11 ISO.
Yup. Then you get this stuff, haha. "This PC can't..." Like hell it can't! It is!
TPM 1.2, secure boot disabled and a 6th gen i5.

*Also, installed alongside macOS opencore 7.0 without issues. Just deleted the win10 partition and it was the same procedure/results as win10 is... for now, anyway.
 

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lpedia

Senior Member
Sep 18, 2020
160
78
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2
HTC 10
This worked for me....I have an old optiplex 790 with a Intel i5 4 series....all I did was change the registry through the BIOS on the front en I made the ISO file for USB UEFI boot I got the error saying that my machine hardware was not suitable for Windows 11 so I hit shift and F10 to command prompt and entered notepad because I already copied the registry into a text document that's accessible from the file menu in the notepad never done that before and that was pretty cool..copied it and then went back to the command prompt and went to the regedit.exe... copy what I had on the the text document into the actual local registry and then started the install process all over and Golden... I had to actually download the ISO file from Android host file of all places checksum good...
Thank you, @[email protected] and @GiulianoB!

I now have Windows 11 Preview running on a ~2016 model Dell Inspiron laptop with no TPM (and no option to add one; motherboard isn't capable of it).

I downloaded the ISO from Android File Host, burned it to a USB stick, booted from the stick, and when the install process said the device isn't suitable, used Shift-F10 to open a command prompt.

I ended up running regedit and making the registry changes manually, because the .reg file approach didn't work for me - the install still said the machine wasn't suitable. When I then ran regedit, I found that the keys hadn't been added.

Opening the .reg file had popped up the usual warning and seemed to go make the changes when I said OK. :confused:

So my advice to others: if running the .reg file doesn't make it accept the device, try manually editing the registry.
 

Nameless Foe

Senior Member
Jan 23, 2021
184
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Samsung Galaxy A71 5G
like many, i am getting this error. i have a built PC with a Ryzen 7 2700X. I think there might be a BIOS setting to enable TPM, but I haven't checked yet. Anyone else run into this?

View attachment 5350745

this is the link to the Windows 11 compatibility checker:

Check out my new post, It will bypass TPM and secure boot
 

smithbill

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2007
230
58
Liverpool
I downloaded Win11 ISO from AndroidFileHost as others have mentioned, burnt it to USB, added the .reg file with the REG keys as explained above, booted my HP Compaq 8200 Elite USDT (10yrs old now!) currently installed with Win10Pro, from the Win11 USB, got to the "this PC can't run Win11" message, pressed shift+F10, ran the .reg file and resumed the installation. Did a clean install of Win11 (it won't let you do an 'upgrade' of the existing Win10Pro) and the whole process completed & booted fine. It says it's activated with a 'digital license' based on my Microsoft login.

The only issue I had with the above, is that I needed to open Notepad.exe and correct the double-quotes in my tiny .reg file as they were originally the wrong type of double-quote characters.

Initially Win11 was using about 60% of my installed 4Gb of memory, but after a few Windows updates & reboots this has dropped and now Win11 seems to sit at around 1.3Gb in use (before opening any apps). CPU usage seems fine.

As for Win11 itself - I hate it. So far, it's pretty rubbish. No longer can you right-click on the taskbar to access things like the Task Manager - it's now buried in a 'control-panel' style dialog. There's no Start menu as such (and I believe Microsoft have plugged the workaround people were using to get the Win10 Start menu on Win11). The whole look-and-feel seems like a rather low budget 'theme' applied to the old Win10 environment with rather flat looking icons shoved into a 'control panel' rather than the well accustomed Start Menu.

When you compare this new Win11 to the many flavours of Linux freely available these days (Ubuntu, Zorin, Manjaro etc), it looks & feels dated, flat, uninteresting, and a complete turn-off. I'll persevere with it & keep it running on my HP Compaq machine, but so far I'm sufficiently disappointed with it to say, it's not worth bothering with & I'll either be sticking with Win10 on all my other machines, or else installing Manjaro Linux (or both).
 
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lpedia

Senior Member
Sep 18, 2020
160
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Samsung Galaxy Tab S2
HTC 10
... The only issue I had with the above, is that I needed to open Notepad.exe and correct the double-quotes in my tiny .reg file as they were originally the wrong type of double-quote characters.
True. I realised later that the 'smart' double-quotes in the copied reg entry were the reason that the .reg file hadn't worked for me. But running regedit directly did the trick for me.
... As for Win11 itself - I hate it. So far, it's pretty rubbish. No longer can you right-click on the taskbar to access things like the Task Manager - it's now buried in a 'control-panel' style dialog.
LOL.

The approach seems to be "Why one click when two or more will do?", and "Why make all the vertical space on the display available?" - putting the Start menu app list another click away, forcing taskbar icon grouping so that what used to be single-click taskbar actions are no longer so easy, gluing the taskbar to the bottom of the screen where it's less convenient to get to, takes up vertical space (unless it's set to auto-hide, which is itself an abomination), and is too close to important buttons in some app windows (at the bottom left of the window).

I can't think of any good reason for any of these changes. Eg, they can't be argued as helping improve touch-screen access, which is supposed to be an objective of Win 11.

And yes, the latest 'feature update' for Win 11 Preview has blocked the registry hack that restored the 'Classic' Start menu.
 

smithbill

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2007
230
58
Liverpool
I think Windows 11 is the beginning of the end of Microsoft (at least in terms of desktop Operating Systems).

I realise it's still early days in terms of its look & feel, it's usability & performance etc, but so far, it's sorely lacking when compared to other freely available Operating Systems.

But more than this, the Draconian requirements for Joe Public to have a PC or laptop less than a few years old, reasonable CPU, TPM & SecureBoot, people are just going to say "no, I won't bother, I'm not going to bin my 3year old Desktop that I paid £800 for just so I can use the latest Windows. I'll stick with what I have" And the Linux & ChromeOS, and even Android and Mac/iOS alternatives, will gain in popularity as better choices (and deservedly so in my opinion).
 

inooodevil

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Jul 23, 2021
3
2
www.yehiweb.com
Follow these steps to bypass Windows 11 TPM 2.0 requirements:
  1. Install Windows 11 via bootable installation media we created via Rufus. If your system hardware doesn’t meet the Windows 11 requirements. You will see the following message stating:
    This PC can’t run Windows 11.
  2. If the above message appears on your screen when installing Windows 11. Press Shift + F10 keys on your keyboard to launch the command prompt window. Type “Regedit” in the command prompt and hit enter to launch the Windows Registry Editor.
  3. Navigate to the following when the registry editor opens: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup
  4. Right-click on the setup folder, and from the submenu, select New>Key.
  5. Name the key you created “LabConfig” when prompted and hit enter.
  6. Right-click on the LabConfig key and select New > DWORD (32-bit) value. Name the value you created BypassTPMCheck. Create two more values with the following names:
    BypassRAMCheck
    BypassSecureBootCheck
  7. Now double-click on each value you created and set the date to 1 for each.
  8. After configuring all three values under the LabConfig key, close the registry editor.
  9. Next, in the Command Prompt window, type “Exit” and hit enter to close the window.
  10. Now that you are back at the message stating, “This PC can’t run Windows 11,”. On the Windows Setup window, click the back button as shown below.
  11. Doing so will take you back to the screen, prompting you to select the Windows version you want to install.
  12. Proceed without worrying about hardware requirements and install Windows 11.

    if you are still facing problems then you can go to yehiweb and read it with screenshots
 
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smithbill

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Jun 24, 2007
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For those of us who have installed a fresh Windows 11 from ISO (as per the above instructions) and activated it based on a Digital License, does anyone have any idea if it will continue to a) operate on hardware that doesn't meet the TPM/SecureBoot spec b) receive updates, AFTER Microsoft actually release Win11 to the general public? I've read that those who have installed from Win11 ISO's will be able to continue using it, but there's no clarity if a) & b) will apply. Any ideas?

Obviously if Win11 won't operate/update, then it's pointless persevering with it and I may as well go back to Win10 now.
 
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lpedia

Senior Member
Sep 18, 2020
160
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HTC 10
For those of us who have installed a fresh Windows 11 from ISO (as per the above instructions) and activated it based on a Digital License, does anyone have any idea if it will continue to a) operate on hardware that doesn't meet the TPM/SecureBoot spec b) receive updates, AFTER Microsoft actually release Win11 to the general public? I've read that those who have installed from Win11 ISO's will be able to continue using it, but there's no clarity if a) & b) will apply. Any ideas?

Obviously if Win11 won't operate/update, then it's pointless persevering with it and I may as well go back to Win10 now.
These recent articles from The Verge might answer some of the questions, but at this stage it sounds like only approved Windows 11 platforms will get updates: Microsoft won’t stop you installing Windows 11 on older PCs but Microsoft is threatening to withhold Windows 11 updates if your CPU is old.

They have been known to back down on such threats before, but I wouldn't hold my breath.
 

sd_shadow

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For those of us who have installed a fresh Windows 11 from ISO (as per the above instructions) and activated it based on a Digital License, does anyone have any idea if it will continue to a) operate on hardware that doesn't meet the TPM/SecureBoot spec b) receive updates, AFTER Microsoft actually release Win11 to the general public? I've read that those who have installed from Win11 ISO's will be able to continue using it, but there's no clarity if a) & b) will apply. Any ideas?

Obviously if Win11 won't operate/update, then it's pointless persevering with it and I may as well go back to Win10 now.
I don't think Microsoft has decided that yet.
 

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    For those of us who have installed a fresh Windows 11 from ISO (as per the above instructions) and activated it based on a Digital License, does anyone have any idea if it will continue to a) operate on hardware that doesn't meet the TPM/SecureBoot spec b) receive updates, AFTER Microsoft actually release Win11 to the general public? I've read that those who have installed from Win11 ISO's will be able to continue using it, but there's no clarity if a) & b) will apply. Any ideas?

    Obviously if Win11 won't operate/update, then it's pointless persevering with it and I may as well go back to Win10 now.
    1
    Tpm 2, aaaargh, my wan got killed so formatted it as a c drive. I got lost in all the Hp install this to install that to install the single whatever that came with the first installation, only to fire it all onto a dos or uefi drive, uefi preffered, but my tpm is 'NOT SEEN' or non existant when it comes to testing this. I bought this lappy for 20 notes after someone accidently pushed an sdcard into the sim slot, and used whatever to rip it back out freezing the bios with a sheilding short.

    It took a month to decipher it all enough to reset the bios backup chip that had a previous password, tpm shows, in bios, and in windows, but they instructions provided by Hp leave you solving so many other Hp apps that you lose focus on the point of installing it all...

    mine is kinda wrecked...

    yet 1.2 is working... wtf?

    Tpm keys. (is/are not set)

    In my scenario, I got as far as making the usb to load the uefi efi file required to update my tpm, but the tpm keys were not set. I can use 'customer' keys, but being a corporate laptop, the corporate keys were stored in the bios backup chip, not the bios chip I backed up before I realised it was a dual bios, though not used as such...

    Without the corporate tpm keys, the customer tpm keys are used, for Tpm 1.2 I'm currently on, tpm customer keys cannot update the tpm, so for me tpm does not show to the tpm 2 updater.

    Just some insight through experience :)
    1
    Tpm 2, aaaargh, my wan got killed so formatted it as a c drive. I got lost in all the Hp install this to install that to install the single whatever that came with the first installation, only to fire it all onto a dos or uefi drive, uefi preffered, but my tpm is 'NOT SEEN' or non existant when it comes to testing this. I bought this lappy for 20 notes after someone accidently pushed an sdcard into the sim slot, and used whatever to rip it back out freezing the bios with a sheilding short.

    It took a month to decipher it all enough to reset the bios backup chip that had a previous password, tpm shows, in bios, and in windows, but they instructions provided by Hp leave you solving so many other Hp apps that you lose focus on the point of installing it all...

    mine is kinda wrecked...

    yet 1.2 is working... wtf?

    Tpm keys. (is/are not set)

    In my scenario, I got as far as making the usb to load the uefi efi file required to update my tpm, but the tpm keys were not set. I can use 'customer' keys, but being a corporate laptop, the corporate keys were stored in the bios backup chip, not the bios chip I backed up before I realised it was a dual bios, though not used as such...

    Without the corporate tpm keys, the customer tpm keys are used, for Tpm 1.2 I'm currently on, tpm customer keys cannot update the tpm, so for me tpm does not show to the tpm 2 updater.

    Just some insight through experience :)
    great experience
  • 2
    Just run tpm.msc and it should give you status of TPM. If your PC supports it and it's in disabled state you can enable it from BIOS as earlier post suggests
    2
    I think that by "support" they mean that they won't work on bugs that are experienced by older systems. If you look here you will see that they warn users not meeting the hardware requirement that their installation "may result in a degraded experience & some features may not work properly" : https://blogs.windows.com/windows-i...ing-for-insider-preview-builds-of-windows-11/. They don't actually say that it won't work at all.
    yes after researching a bit i also come to same conclusion. thanks for info.
    2
    Windows 11 installed fine on my cheap HP desktop.
    Screenshot 2021-06-29 183820.png
    2
    This worked for me....I have an old optiplex 790 with a Intel i5 4 series....all I did was change the registry through the BIOS on the front en I made the ISO file for USB UEFI boot I got the error saying that my machine hardware was not suitable for Windows 11 so I hit shift and F10 to command prompt and entered notepad because I already copied the registry into a text document that's accessible from the file menu in the notepad never done that before and that was pretty cool..copied it and then went back to the command prompt and went to the regedit.exe... copy what I had on the the text document into the actual local registry and then started the install process all over and Golden... I had to actually download the ISO file from Android host file of all places checksum good...
    Thank you, @[email protected] and @GiulianoB!

    I now have Windows 11 Preview running on a ~2016 model Dell Inspiron laptop with no TPM (and no option to add one; motherboard isn't capable of it).

    I downloaded the ISO from Android File Host, burned it to a USB stick, booted from the stick, and when the install process said the device isn't suitable, used Shift-F10 to open a command prompt.

    I ended up running regedit and making the registry changes manually, because the .reg file approach didn't work for me - the install still said the machine wasn't suitable. When I then ran regedit, I found that the keys hadn't been added.

    Opening the .reg file had popped up the usual warning and seemed to go make the changes when I said OK. :confused:

    So my advice to others: if running the .reg file doesn't make it accept the device, try manually editing the registry.
    2
    That's not correct, I received 11 as an update on my HP with a 7th Generation Intel® Core™ i3 Processor
    I think that by "support" they mean that they won't work on bugs that are experienced by older systems. If you look here you will see that they warn users not meeting the hardware requirement that their installation "may result in a degraded experience & some features may not work properly" : https://blogs.windows.com/windows-i...ing-for-insider-preview-builds-of-windows-11/. They don't actually say that it won't work at all.