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"This PC can't run Windows 11"

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smithbill

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2007
233
61
Liverpool
I downloaded Win11 ISO from AndroidFileHost as others have mentioned, burnt it to USB, added the .reg file with the REG keys as explained above, booted my HP Compaq 8200 Elite USDT (10yrs old now!) currently installed with Win10Pro, from the Win11 USB, got to the "this PC can't run Win11" message, pressed shift+F10, ran the .reg file and resumed the installation. Did a clean install of Win11 (it won't let you do an 'upgrade' of the existing Win10Pro) and the whole process completed & booted fine. It says it's activated with a 'digital license' based on my Microsoft login.

The only issue I had with the above, is that I needed to open Notepad.exe and correct the double-quotes in my tiny .reg file as they were originally the wrong type of double-quote characters.

Initially Win11 was using about 60% of my installed 4Gb of memory, but after a few Windows updates & reboots this has dropped and now Win11 seems to sit at around 1.3Gb in use (before opening any apps). CPU usage seems fine.

As for Win11 itself - I hate it. So far, it's pretty rubbish. No longer can you right-click on the taskbar to access things like the Task Manager - it's now buried in a 'control-panel' style dialog. There's no Start menu as such (and I believe Microsoft have plugged the workaround people were using to get the Win10 Start menu on Win11). The whole look-and-feel seems like a rather low budget 'theme' applied to the old Win10 environment with rather flat looking icons shoved into a 'control panel' rather than the well accustomed Start Menu.

When you compare this new Win11 to the many flavours of Linux freely available these days (Ubuntu, Zorin, Manjaro etc), it looks & feels dated, flat, uninteresting, and a complete turn-off. I'll persevere with it & keep it running on my HP Compaq machine, but so far I'm sufficiently disappointed with it to say, it's not worth bothering with & I'll either be sticking with Win10 on all my other machines, or else installing Manjaro Linux (or both).
 
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lpedia

Senior Member
Sep 18, 2020
180
83
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2
HTC 10
... The only issue I had with the above, is that I needed to open Notepad.exe and correct the double-quotes in my tiny .reg file as they were originally the wrong type of double-quote characters.
True. I realised later that the 'smart' double-quotes in the copied reg entry were the reason that the .reg file hadn't worked for me. But running regedit directly did the trick for me.
... As for Win11 itself - I hate it. So far, it's pretty rubbish. No longer can you right-click on the taskbar to access things like the Task Manager - it's now buried in a 'control-panel' style dialog.
LOL.

The approach seems to be "Why one click when two or more will do?", and "Why make all the vertical space on the display available?" - putting the Start menu app list another click away, forcing taskbar icon grouping so that what used to be single-click taskbar actions are no longer so easy, gluing the taskbar to the bottom of the screen where it's less convenient to get to, takes up vertical space (unless it's set to auto-hide, which is itself an abomination), and is too close to important buttons in some app windows (at the bottom left of the window).

I can't think of any good reason for any of these changes. Eg, they can't be argued as helping improve touch-screen access, which is supposed to be an objective of Win 11.

And yes, the latest 'feature update' for Win 11 Preview has blocked the registry hack that restored the 'Classic' Start menu.
 

smithbill

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2007
233
61
Liverpool
I think Windows 11 is the beginning of the end of Microsoft (at least in terms of desktop Operating Systems).

I realise it's still early days in terms of its look & feel, it's usability & performance etc, but so far, it's sorely lacking when compared to other freely available Operating Systems.

But more than this, the Draconian requirements for Joe Public to have a PC or laptop less than a few years old, reasonable CPU, TPM & SecureBoot, people are just going to say "no, I won't bother, I'm not going to bin my 3year old Desktop that I paid £800 for just so I can use the latest Windows. I'll stick with what I have" And the Linux & ChromeOS, and even Android and Mac/iOS alternatives, will gain in popularity as better choices (and deservedly so in my opinion).
 

AmznUser444 Dev

Senior Member
To install Windows 11 on an old PC by bypassing TPM and Secure Boot using registry
1. Boot Windows 11 from USB media and select your preferred language.
2. On the next page, click Install Now.
3. On Activate Windows page, Press Shift + F10 to open a command prompt window.
4. Type notepad on the command prompt and hit enter.
5. Copy the following and save it as a .REG file format tpmbypass.reg in the source folder.
Code:
Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig]
"BypassTPMCheck"=dword:00000001
"BypassSecureBootCheck"=dword:00000001
6. Once saved, select File > Open and specify All Files for the file type.
7. Find tpmbypass.reg, right-click, and select Merge.
8. Voila, Windows 11 will be installed on your old PC.

If you are stuck on Getting devices ready progress
1. Hold the power button of your PC in 5 seconds to turn it off forcefully and turn it back on.
2. If you see The computer restarted unexpectedly error message, press Shift + F10 to open a command prompt window.
3. Type regedit and hit enter to start Registry Editor.
4. Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\Status\ChildCompletion and double-click the setup.exe on the right pane.
5. Change the Value Data from 1 to 3 and click OK to save changes.
6. Close Registry Editor and click OK on the error message restart your PC and is now fixed.
 

tin2404

Senior Member

Modifying registry while installing​

3.1 Boot from the Windows 11 installation media

3.2 Start to install, we will see the Error “This PC can’t run Windows 11”

3.3 Use Shift + F10 to open command prompt window

3.4 Type regedit then Press Enter key

3.5 Find HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup

3.6 Create Item New Key: LabConfig

3.7 Inside of LabConfig,

Create DWORD 32, BypassTPMCheck, Value 00000001

Create DWORD 32, BypassSecureBootCheck, Value 00000001

3.8 Save and Exit Registry Editor

Continue to install/upgrade, we may have another hardware compatibility error during the process, Click Exit, ignore the error and roll back, Use Win + E to open file explorer, Delete C:\$WINDOWS.~BT\Sources\AppraiserRes.dll , Launch Windows update again.
 

inooodevil

New member
Jul 23, 2021
3
2
www.yehiweb.com
Follow these steps to bypass Windows 11 TPM 2.0 requirements:
  1. Install Windows 11 via bootable installation media we created via Rufus. If your system hardware doesn’t meet the Windows 11 requirements. You will see the following message stating:
    This PC can’t run Windows 11.
  2. If the above message appears on your screen when installing Windows 11. Press Shift + F10 keys on your keyboard to launch the command prompt window. Type “Regedit” in the command prompt and hit enter to launch the Windows Registry Editor.
  3. Navigate to the following when the registry editor opens: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup
  4. Right-click on the setup folder, and from the submenu, select New>Key.
  5. Name the key you created “LabConfig” when prompted and hit enter.
  6. Right-click on the LabConfig key and select New > DWORD (32-bit) value. Name the value you created BypassTPMCheck. Create two more values with the following names:
    BypassRAMCheck
    BypassSecureBootCheck
  7. Now double-click on each value you created and set the date to 1 for each.
  8. After configuring all three values under the LabConfig key, close the registry editor.
  9. Next, in the Command Prompt window, type “Exit” and hit enter to close the window.
  10. Now that you are back at the message stating, “This PC can’t run Windows 11,”. On the Windows Setup window, click the back button as shown below.
  11. Doing so will take you back to the screen, prompting you to select the Windows version you want to install.
  12. Proceed without worrying about hardware requirements and install Windows 11.

    if you are still facing problems then you can go to yehiweb and read it with screenshots
 
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smithbill

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2007
233
61
Liverpool
For those of us who have installed a fresh Windows 11 from ISO (as per the above instructions) and activated it based on a Digital License, does anyone have any idea if it will continue to a) operate on hardware that doesn't meet the TPM/SecureBoot spec b) receive updates, AFTER Microsoft actually release Win11 to the general public? I've read that those who have installed from Win11 ISO's will be able to continue using it, but there's no clarity if a) & b) will apply. Any ideas?

Obviously if Win11 won't operate/update, then it's pointless persevering with it and I may as well go back to Win10 now.
 
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lpedia

Senior Member
Sep 18, 2020
180
83
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2
HTC 10
For those of us who have installed a fresh Windows 11 from ISO (as per the above instructions) and activated it based on a Digital License, does anyone have any idea if it will continue to a) operate on hardware that doesn't meet the TPM/SecureBoot spec b) receive updates, AFTER Microsoft actually release Win11 to the general public? I've read that those who have installed from Win11 ISO's will be able to continue using it, but there's no clarity if a) & b) will apply. Any ideas?

Obviously if Win11 won't operate/update, then it's pointless persevering with it and I may as well go back to Win10 now.
These recent articles from The Verge might answer some of the questions, but at this stage it sounds like only approved Windows 11 platforms will get updates: Microsoft won’t stop you installing Windows 11 on older PCs but Microsoft is threatening to withhold Windows 11 updates if your CPU is old.

They have been known to back down on such threats before, but I wouldn't hold my breath.
 

sd_shadow

Recognized Contributor
Sep 21, 2011
18,198
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South Dakota
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For those of us who have installed a fresh Windows 11 from ISO (as per the above instructions) and activated it based on a Digital License, does anyone have any idea if it will continue to a) operate on hardware that doesn't meet the TPM/SecureBoot spec b) receive updates, AFTER Microsoft actually release Win11 to the general public? I've read that those who have installed from Win11 ISO's will be able to continue using it, but there's no clarity if a) & b) will apply. Any ideas?

Obviously if Win11 won't operate/update, then it's pointless persevering with it and I may as well go back to Win10 now.
I don't think Microsoft has decided that yet.
 

The Root

Senior Member
Dec 6, 2010
5,610
2,223
Long Beach, CA
Not sure if anyone has run into this, but I had to convert my main drive from mpr to gpt. I've had the main drive forever and now have the hardware to support secure boot. Once I converted it in the Windows recovery everything went smoothly and I was eligible for Win11 through Insider Program.
 

Pachacouti

Senior Member
Jul 8, 2020
232
44
52
The Capital above the Lower one...
Tpm 2, aaaargh, my wan got killed so formatted it as a c drive. I got lost in all the Hp install this to install that to install the single whatever that came with the first installation, only to fire it all onto a dos or uefi drive, uefi preffered, but my tpm is 'NOT SEEN' or non existant when it comes to testing this. I bought this lappy for 20 notes after someone accidently pushed an sdcard into the sim slot, and used whatever to rip it back out freezing the bios with a sheilding short.

It took a month to decipher it all enough to reset the bios backup chip that had a previous password, tpm shows, in bios, and in windows, but they instructions provided by Hp leave you solving so many other Hp apps that you lose focus on the point of installing it all...

mine is kinda wrecked...

yet 1.2 is working... wtf?

Tpm keys. (is/are not set)

In my scenario, I got as far as making the usb to load the uefi efi file required to update my tpm, but the tpm keys were not set. I can use 'customer' keys, but being a corporate laptop, the corporate keys were stored in the bios backup chip, not the bios chip I backed up before I realised it was a dual bios, though not used as such...

Without the corporate tpm keys, the customer tpm keys are used, for Tpm 1.2 I'm currently on, tpm customer keys cannot update the tpm, so for me tpm does not show to the tpm 2 updater.

Just some insight through experience :)
 
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inooodevil

New member
Jul 23, 2021
3
2
www.yehiweb.com
Tpm 2, aaaargh, my wan got killed so formatted it as a c drive. I got lost in all the Hp install this to install that to install the single whatever that came with the first installation, only to fire it all onto a dos or uefi drive, uefi preffered, but my tpm is 'NOT SEEN' or non existant when it comes to testing this. I bought this lappy for 20 notes after someone accidently pushed an sdcard into the sim slot, and used whatever to rip it back out freezing the bios with a sheilding short.

It took a month to decipher it all enough to reset the bios backup chip that had a previous password, tpm shows, in bios, and in windows, but they instructions provided by Hp leave you solving so many other Hp apps that you lose focus on the point of installing it all...

mine is kinda wrecked...

yet 1.2 is working... wtf?

Tpm keys. (is/are not set)

In my scenario, I got as far as making the usb to load the uefi efi file required to update my tpm, but the tpm keys were not set. I can use 'customer' keys, but being a corporate laptop, the corporate keys were stored in the bios backup chip, not the bios chip I backed up before I realised it was a dual bios, though not used as such...

Without the corporate tpm keys, the customer tpm keys are used, for Tpm 1.2 I'm currently on, tpm customer keys cannot update the tpm, so for me tpm does not show to the tpm 2 updater.

Just some insight through experience :)
great experience
 
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Pachacouti

Senior Member
Jul 8, 2020
232
44
52
The Capital above the Lower one...
I'm excited to try windows 11 but my machine is very old i7-4720 and don't have TPM 2.0, i know there is workaround, when i saw the UI and android app via amazon store will be available later, i'm very excited.

Is there anyone try windows 11 without TPM 2.0 with just modified registry in set up installer? (without replace dll or install.wim/esd)
Win 11 WILL go on an i7, it went on my i5, hp elitebook 820, but I dropped it when I saw amazon :O
 

Muzafir Ali

New member
Mar 28, 2013
1
0
like many, i am getting this error. i have a built PC with a Ryzen 7 2700X. I think there might be a BIOS setting to enable TPM, but I haven't checked yet. Anyone else run into this?

View attachment 5350745

this is the link to the Windows 11 compatibility checker:

I recently download and install windows 11 from youtube channel DIY bros, the link is already bypassed TPM 2.0 & secure boot issues, its installed like normal windows 10 installations, and the funny thing is they explain like beginners who never know how to install any windows into PC or laptop, I recommend to visit and see, specially a new users who really don't know how to install windows.
 

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    Just run tpm.msc and it should give you status of TPM. If your PC supports it and it's in disabled state you can enable it from BIOS as earlier post suggests
    2
    I think that by "support" they mean that they won't work on bugs that are experienced by older systems. If you look here you will see that they warn users not meeting the hardware requirement that their installation "may result in a degraded experience & some features may not work properly" : https://blogs.windows.com/windows-i...ing-for-insider-preview-builds-of-windows-11/. They don't actually say that it won't work at all.
    yes after researching a bit i also come to same conclusion. thanks for info.
    2
    Windows 11 installed fine on my cheap HP desktop.
    Screenshot 2021-06-29 183820.png
    2
    That's not correct, I received 11 as an update on my HP with a 7th Generation Intel® Core™ i3 Processor
    I think that by "support" they mean that they won't work on bugs that are experienced by older systems. If you look here you will see that they warn users not meeting the hardware requirement that their installation "may result in a degraded experience & some features may not work properly" : https://blogs.windows.com/windows-i...ing-for-insider-preview-builds-of-windows-11/. They don't actually say that it won't work at all.
    2
    Not all CPUs are compatible with that, and not all the manufacturers give the option to enable TPM. Lets bypass it, shall we? Create a new txt file anywhere on your pc and open it. After that, add the following lines:
    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\LabConfig] “BypassTPMCheck”=dword:00000001 “BypassSecureBootCheck”=dword:00000001

    Save the file, and then rename it, just remove the "txt" and replace it with "reg". Open the file and BOOM. The setup should work.