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Universal custom recovery

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Nikola.L

Member
Sep 23, 2018
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Hi, I'm kind of a noob when it comes to rooting devices (I've done it, but only with tutorials I can't do it on my own). Recently I got stuck with my device as I can't find a custom recovery for it.

My question is, is there a universal custom recovery for all smartphones or some kind of temporary custom recovery that can help me just to root my decide?
 

Droidriven

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Jan 27, 2014
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Hi, I'm kind of a noob when it comes to rooting devices (I've done it, but only with tutorials I can't do it on my own). Recently I got stuck with my device as I can't find a custom recovery for it.

My question is, is there a universal custom recovery for all smartphones or some kind of temporary custom recovery that can help me just to root my decide?
There is no such thing as a universal custom recovery that works with all devices. There is only custom recovery built for each specific device model number or custom recovery that is compatible with your specific CPU chipset.

Have you considered using Magisk to root your device?

First, you need to find out if your bootloader is locked or unlocked, if it is locked, you'll have to find a method to unlock the bootloader on your specific model number. If it is unlocked, you can use the Magisk method to root your device. You can't use TWRP or Magisk if your bootloader is locked.
 

Nikola.L

Member
Sep 23, 2018
6
0
There is no such thing as a universal custom recovery that works with all devices. There is only custom recovery built for each specific device model number or custom recovery that is compatible with your specific CPU chipset.

Have you considered using Magisk to root your device?

First, you need to find out if your bootloader is locked or unlocked, if it is locked, you'll have to find a method to unlock the bootloader on your specific model number. If it is unlocked, you can use the Magisk method to root your device. You can't use TWRP or Magisk if your bootloader is locked.
I managed to unlock my bootloader, that part is done. The problem with magisk is that I need boot image for my device like I mentioned above and there is none online.
 

jwoegerbauer

Senior Member
Jul 11, 2009
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Thank you for replying, the metod without custom recovery requires me to have boot.img which i don't have because there is none online for my specific device.

I tried to Google my way around (extract the image from my own device) but that requires custom recovery
To root device's Android Magisk - or whatever else 3rd-party tool - is NOT needed if Android version is 6 and up: one only have to replace the merged restricted Toybox by an unrestricted version ( e.g. 0.8.5 ) what comes with SU embedded.
 

Droidriven

Senior Member
Jan 27, 2014
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To root device's Android Magisk - or whatever else 3rd-party tool - is NOT needed if Android version is 6 and up: one only have to replace the merged restricted Toybox by an unrestricted version ( e.g. 0.8.5 ) what comes with SU embedded.
I'm assuming that the restricted toybox that you are talking about is part of the system partition. The problem with this idea is that root is required BEFORE you can remove, replace or install anything to or from system partition.

I did a search for:

"Root android merge Toybox"

And I got absolutely no results of any kind discussing how to root android by this method. However, I did see discussions of doing what you mentioned AFTER the device had already been rooted prior to attempting to merge Toybox.

I'm not sure that you understand its usage properly. If that is the case, don't suggest things that you don't understand in depth.
 

jwoegerbauer

Senior Member
Jul 11, 2009
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I'm not sure that you understand its usage properly. If that is the case, don't suggest things that you don't understand in depth.

Why do you troll me? That you lack imagination, I can't help that.

I have several phones' Android rooted the way mentioned above. Also someone in another thread some weeks ago has reported he/she successfully managed it, too.

All you need is a copy of unrestricted Toybox suitable to phone's Android, a working ADB connection and of course knowledge of ADB commands & Linux shell scripting.

FYI: Toybox is located either in /system or /vendor.

toybox.jpg


I will reconsider if I want to be active here at all ...
 
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Nikola.L

Member
Sep 23, 2018
6
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Why do you troll me? That you lack imagination, I can't help that.

I have several phones' Android rooted the way mentioned above. Also someone in another thread some weeks ago has reported he/she successfully managed it, too.

All you need is a copy of unrestricted Toybox suitable to phone's Android, a working ADB connection and of course knowledge of ADB commands & Linux shell scripting.

FYI: Toybox is located either in /system or /vendor.

View attachment 5415783

I will reconsider if I want to be active here at all ...
Can you provide me with download link for this program? Also any kind of pointers would be helpful if you have any. Thanks a lot!
 

Droidriven

Senior Member
Jan 27, 2014
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Why do you troll me? That you lack imagination, I can't help that.

I have several phones' Android rooted the way mentioned above. Also someone in another thread some weeks ago has reported he/she successfully managed it, too.

All you need is a copy of unrestricted Toybox suitable to phone's Android, a working ADB connection and of course knowledge of ADB commands & Linux shell scripting.

FYI: Toybox is located either in /system or /vendor.

View attachment 5415783

I will reconsider if I want to be active here at all ...
I wasn't trolling, I looked into what you were talking about and I didn't find anything at all about how to use this to root a device, nothing about devices that have been rooted using this method and nothing about which devices it works on or doesn't which made me have doubts, so I questioned you about it.

How is this able to inject anything that isn't stock into system without already being rooted? In my experience, unlocking bootloader allows applying custom software but doesn't allow applying anything to a stock system without being rooted first. If it were that easy, there wouldn't be so many devices on this website that do not have working root methods. If what you say is true then this would work on all devices but it obviously does not. I'll grant that it may work on certain devices but not all. There are many devices since Marshmallow that have not found root by any method, no matter what has been tried. If it were that easy, this method would be more popular and more people would be using it and there would be many, many threads here describing how those users used this method to root this device. My thoughts are that this method must have some kind of limitations on what it works on what it doesnt, which would explain why this method isn't more known or more popular. I've been on this website for many years, including being a Recognized Contributor and a Forum Moderator, I know this website very well and I've seen many different rooting methods come and go, each time there is a breakthrough in rooting methods, that breakthrough immediately becomes more popular and used by everyone and I don't see this happening with the method you mention. I'm just saying there has to be more to this method than what you think.

What kinds of devices have you used this on?
 
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jwoegerbauer

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Jul 11, 2009
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@Droidriven

that the method I mentioned is not popular probably has to do with people not knowing how Android works, people not really knowing what rooting means, people not being able to think EASILY, people not being willing to use ADB ( wrapped into a Windows command script ) or EDIFY ( wrapped into an updater-script ) but people always expecting an app they can click / touch around in.

BTW: I hate all those 3rd-party tools that promise to root Android, especially if they are not open-sourced, I can't see what the programs actually do.

The method I mentioned DOES NOT INJECT additional binaries but simply replaces an existing one - namely Toybox: Toybox is integral part of any Android version 6 and higher, it's independet of a device's brand / model.
As said above: This can get achieved by either a Windows command script utilizing ADB commands and a temporay root or an updater-script utilizing EDIFY commands. IMO using an updater-script ( stored in OTA file ) of course is the more elegant way, it even can get flashed via ADB Sideload method from within Stock Recovery.


See also here:
 
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Droidriven

Senior Member
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@Droidriven

that the method I mentioned is not popular probably has to do with people not knowing how Android works, people not really knowing what rooting means, people not being able to think EASILY, people not being willing to use ADB ( wrapped into a Windows command script ) or EDIFY ( wrapped into an updater-script ) but people always expecting an app they can click / touch around in.

BTW: I hate all those 3rd-party tools that promise to root Android, especially if they are not open-sourced, I can't see what the programs actually do.

The method I mentioned DOES NOT INJECT additional binaries but simply replaces an existing one - namely Toybox: Toybox is integral part of any Android version 6 and higher, it's independet of a device's brand / model.
As said above: This can get achieved by either a Windows command script utilizing ADB commands and a temporay root or an updater-script utilizing EDIFY commands. IMO using an updater-script ( stored in OTA file ) of course is the more elegant way, it even can get flashed via ADB Sideload method from within Stock Recovery.


See also here:
Well that explains it, the method you are talking about uses temp ROOT, it is like I said from the beginning, root(whether temporary or permanent) is required in order to inject anything (and yes, this method DOES inject additional binaries, the su binaries, they weren't there to begin with so they are "additional binaries", they are just included with the replaced file). That part about temp root leads me to believe that may be a factor in some way that limits what devices the method will work on or not.

I've used a similar method to this to root an Intel Atom based device years ago.

I'll try this on a couple of devices that I have that haven't been rooted and see what happens, though I'm not expecting positive results considering the many different methods and tricks that I've learned over the years on them.
 
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jwoegerbauer

Senior Member
Jul 11, 2009
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To clarify things:
A temporary root is only required if ADB ( Windows command script ) is used.

FYI:
If using ADB ( Windows command script ) then temporary root ( read: matching SU binary, ~100 KB ) by serious programmers gets temporarily stored in /data/local/tmp what by default is mounted as RW on any Android and gets deleted if no longer used.
 
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Droidriven

Senior Member
Jan 27, 2014
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To clarify things:
A temporary root is only required if ADB ( Windows command script ) is used.

FYI:
If using ADB ( Windows command script ) then temporary root ( read: matching SU binary, ~100 KB ) by serious programmers gets temporarily stored in /data/local/tmp what by default is mounted as RW on any Android and gets deleted if no longer used.
Yes, I know what temp root is, I've used it myself by different methods. But, I also know that existing temp root solutions don't necessarily work on all devices, as all things android, YMMV, nothing is universally applicable to all android devices except for the fact that they all have a power button.
 

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