How To Guide Unlock bootloader / Root Pixel 7 Pro [Cheetah] / SafetyNet

Search This thread

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Monday & Tuesday, November 7 & 8, 2022: Pixel 7 Pro Factory Images available:
13.0.0 (TD1A.221105.001, Nov 2022)FlashLinkf2793a62a48bc840b892e74dd515739b657d2727c25edd074064e3ab019e73bf
13.0.0 (TD1A.221105.003, Nov 2022, Verizon, Verizon MVNOs)FlashLink021be73c7c602de0fdefcd3a4c43d0d745188b7847880a0d4a2ccb6aa64c47a6
Tuesday, November 8, 2022: But I lump it in after the standard day's two images above.
13.0.0 (TD1A.221105.001.A1, Nov 2022, Telia)FlashLink8c02369293402dc629728e0966d2ccc1976f513ed783ea2f64dcd1e55e221b3e
Thanks @Namelesswonder!
Much newer radio and modem on TD1A.221105.001.A1, even newer than QPR1 Beta 3.1.
Firmware Image​
Radio Version​
TD1A.221105.001​
radio-cheetah-g5300g-220908-220908-b-9040061​
TD1A.221105.001.A1​
radio-cheetah-g5300g-220908-221031-b-9238462
TD1A.221105.003​
radio-cheetah-g5300g-220908-221006-b-9144834​
T1B3.221003.003​
radio-cheetah-g5300g-220923-221001-b-9127780​
T1B3.221003.008​
radio-cheetah-g5300g-220923-221028-b-9229469

Pixel Update Bulletin—November 2022​


Published November 7, 2022
The Pixel Update Bulletin contains details of security vulnerabilities and functional improvements affecting supported Pixel devices (Google devices). For Google devices, security patch levels of 2022-11-05 or later address all issues in this bulletin and all issues in the November 2022 Android Security Bulletin. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, see Check and update your Android version.
All supported Google devices will receive an update to the 2022-11-05 patch level. We encourage all customers to accept these updates to their devices.
Note: The Google device firmware images are available on the Google Developer site.

Announcements​

  • In addition to the security vulnerabilities described in the November 2022 Android Security Bulletin, Google devices also contain patches for the security vulnerabilities described below.

Security patches​

Vulnerabilities are grouped under the component that they affect. There is a description of the issue and a table with the CVE, associated references, type of vulnerability, severity, and updated Android Open Source Project (AOSP) versions (where applicable). When available, we link the public change that addressed the issue to the bug ID, like the AOSP change list. When multiple changes relate to a single bug, additional references are linked to numbers following the bug ID.


Pixel​

CVEReferencesTypeSeveritySubcomponent
CVE-2022-20459A-239556260 *EoPHighTitan M
CVE-2022-20460A-239557547 *EoPHighTitan M

Qualcomm closed-source components​

CVEReferencesSeveritySubcomponent
CVE-2022-25674A-231226928 *ModerateClosed-source component
CVE-2022-25676A-231226556 *ModerateClosed-source component
CVE-2022-25679A-215246183 *ModerateClosed-source component

Functional patches​

For details on the new bug fixes and functional patches included in this release, refer to the Pixel Community forum.


Common questions and answers​

This section answers common questions that may occur after reading this bulletin.


1. How do I determine if my device is updated to address these issues?


Security patch levels of 2022-11-05 or later address all issues associated with the 2022-11-05 security patch level and all previous patch levels. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, read the instructions on the Google device update schedule.


2. What do the entries in the Type column mean?


Entries in the Type column of the vulnerability details table reference the classification of the security vulnerability.


AbbreviationDefinition
RCERemote code execution
EoPElevation of privilege
IDInformation disclosure
DoSDenial of service
N/AClassification not available

3. What do the entries in the References column mean?


Entries under the References column of the vulnerability details table may contain a prefix identifying the organization to which the reference value belongs.


PrefixReference
A-Android bug ID
QC-Qualcomm reference number
M-MediaTek reference number
N-NVIDIA reference number
B-Broadcom reference number
U-UNISOC reference number

4. What does an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column mean?


Issues that are not publicly available have an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column. The update for that issue is generally contained in the latest binary drivers for Pixel devices available from the Google Developer site.


5. Why are security vulnerabilities split between this bulletin and the Android Security Bulletins?


Security vulnerabilities that are documented in the Android Security Bulletins are required to declare the latest security patch level on Android devices. Additional security vulnerabilities, such as those documented in this bulletin are not required for declaring a security patch level.


Versions​


VersionDateNotes
1.0November 7, 2022Bulletin Published

Kush M.
43 min. ago
Google Pixel Update - November 2022
Announcement

Hello Pixel Community,

We have provided the monthly software update for November 2022. All supported Pixel devices running Android 13 will receive these software updates starting today. The rollout will continue over the next week in phases depending on carrier and device. Users will receive a notification once the OTA becomes available for their device. We encourage you to check your Android version and update to receive the latest software.

Details of this month’s security fixes can be found on the Android Security Bulletin: https://source.android.com/security/bulletin

Thanks,
Google Pixel Support Team


Software versions

Global
  • Pixel 4a: TP1A.221105.002
  • Pixel 4a (5G): TP1A.221105.002
  • Pixel 5: TP1A.221105.002
  • Pixel 5a (5G): TP1A.221105.002
  • Pixel 6: TP1A.221105.002
  • Pixel 6 Pro: TP1A.221105.002
  • Pixel 6a: TP1A.221105.002
  • Pixel 7: TD1A.221105.001
  • Pixel 7 Pro: TD1A.221105.001

Verizon (US)
  • Pixel 7: TD1A.221105.003
  • Pixel 7 Pro: TD1A.221105.003

What’s included

The November 2022 update includes bug fixes and improvements for Pixel users – see below for details.

Battery & Charging
  • Fix for issue causing increased power consumption while certain apps installed *[1]

Display & Graphics
  • Fix for issue occasionally causing green display flicker in in certain conditions *[2]
  • Optimizations for display power consumption to improve thermal performance in certain conditions *[2]

System
  • Fix for issue occasionally causing Photos app to crash when using certain editing features *[2]
---------------------------------------------------------------

Device Applicability

Fixes are available for all supported Pixel devices unless otherwise indicated below.

*[1] Included on Pixel 6, Pixel 6 Pro & Pixel 6a
*[2] Included on Pixel 7 & Pixel 7 Pro

Details
Other

The answer to life, the universe, and everything.​

1667221900824.jpeg
(* I do not claim copyright to this image, nor do I benefit monetarily from it or these posts)

Just kidding (the answer is 42, by the way):
Here there be dragons. 🐉 I am not responsible for anything at all. 😹

VERY IMPORTANT - On the Pixel 7/Pro, we use Magisk to patch init_boot.img, NOT boot.img AND we flash the patched init_boot to the init_boot partition - do not flash it to the boot partition.​

Thanks to @edcsxz, @Lughnasadh, and @AndyYan for news about that and confirming it.

Moved @mariusnoor's provided zero-day OTA.zip to Post #8 - Old news from the OP.

Unlocking or locking the bootloader will wipe the device every single time, so be sure to have your data backed up before doing so, or better yet, just unlock it as soon as you get the device.​

Keep in mind that unlocking the bootloader or rooting might affect your phone's capability to use banking apps such as Google Pay, your local bank's app, or even the ability to install some apps like NetFlix. See Post #2 - Unlocking Bootloader / Rooting / Updating | SafetyNet | ADB/Fastboot & Windows USB Drivers.​

If you're going to re-lock the bootloader, make sure the ROM you have on your phone is completely stock (by flashing the latest official firmware) BEFORE re-locking it.​

There are no permanent negative consequences if you unlock or re-lock the bootloader other than it will wipe your phone, and while your bootloader is unlocked you get a brief screen when you boot the phone telling you (and anyone who sees your phone at the time) that it's unlocked. You will also continue to receive updates (if you've merely unlocked the bootloader, you can take updates as normal) unlike Samsung, Sony, et cetera, which have permanent major consequences with reduced functionality even if you un-root and re-lock your bootloader. If you're actually rooted (not just bootloader unlocked), you'll have to perform extra steps to manually update each month, and to keep root/re-root.

INDEX:

  • Post #2 - Unlocking Bootloader / Rooting / Updating | SafetyNet | ADB/Fastboot & Windows USB Drivers:
    • How to Root the first time / aka How to unlock the Bootloader
    • TL;DR - for the seasoned repeat users
      • Unlocking Bootloader (required in order to root)
      • How to update each month (and also how to root)[requires an unlocked bootloader for updating via this factory image method]
        • OPTIONAL: If you want to flash both slots, after this first time, then after do the following
      • SafetyNet
      • Optional steps when updating - flashing custom kernels
        • The two schools of thought on disabling Verity and Verification
    • ADB/Fastboot and Windows USB Drivers - direct download links and the most recent changelog
  • Post #3 - Other, most important resources:
    • A list of other important apps
    • TWRP [not made for the Pixel 7 (or 6) Pro yet - will update when or if ever it has - don't hold your breath]
    • Factory Images (requires an unlocked bootloader)
    • Full OTA Images(doesn't require an unlocked bootloader - you can ask questions in this thread, but I won't be providing the steps necessary, as I always use the factory image)
      • @mariusnoor's provided official URL to download the zero-day OTA to TD1A.220804.031.
    • Check warranty status
    • Official Google Pixel Update and Software Repair (reported as of January 23, 2022 to still not be updated for the Pixel 6/Pro - no idea if it has yet now, or if it will be for the 7/Pro)
    • Official Google Pixel Install fingerprint calibration software (also available at the bottom of the Update and Software Repair page above) - I believe this is only helpful if you've replaced the screen - if it's anything like the Pixel 6 Pro: if you have the screen replaced, then you *must* have the fingerprint reader replaced as well.
    • Find problem apps or Magisk Modules by rebooting to safe mode
    • Official Google Android Flash Tool (OEM Unlocking needs to be toggled on - you do not have to manually unlock the bootloader - their site will do that on its own)
    • How to determine if you already have Verity and Verification disabled (required for custom kernels for now)
    • How to unroot
  • Post #4 - Google Pixel Updates (more user-friendly to read than Pixel Update Bulletins) (nothing for the P7P yet)
    • Old Google posts/updates
  • Post #5 - Pixel Update Bulletins
    • Old Bulletins
  • Post #6 - Regarding P7P 5G model numbers and capabilities, and how to determine your hardware version
  • Post #7 - My personal advice for how to get your device back up and running as you had it before a factory reset
  • Post #8 - Old news from the OP

Thank you to the following users who have all contributed greatly to my knowledge of Pixels since I came back to XDA a year ago after a few years of mostly inactivity. Apologies if I miss anybody. In alphabetical order:

 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member

Unlocking Bootloader / Rooting / Updating | SafetyNet | ADB/Fastboot & Windows USB Drivers


Unlocking Bootloader / Rooting / Updating:

How to Root the first time / aka How to unlock the Bootloader:
Unlocking the bootloader will factory reset your device. There is no way around this. I highly suggest never re-locking your bootloader once you unlock it. If you do ever re-lock the bootloader, only do so after restoring the phone to 100% stock by using the latest Pixel 7 Pro Factory Image or Official Google Android Flash Tool.

Verizon variants:
Will never be able to have their bootloader unlocked. It's like winning the lottery, and just as rare and relatively random. There is nothing that anyone on XDA can do to help you unlock your Verizon variant.

T-Mobile and AT&T variants:
Can be unlocked once you pay the phone off, then you contact the carrier and arrange to Carrier unlock the phone. Once the phone is Carrier unlocked, then you can unlock the bootloader with the usual caveats (will wipe the device and there's no way around it).

The direct-from-Google (or other retailers who aren't U.S. Carriers), the factory Carrier Unlocked Pixels:
Can be bootloader unlocked at any time. I'd try it first before putting a SIM card in the phone. If OEM unlocking is grayed out, try connecting to Wi-Fi, and reboot if necessary. If it's still grayed out, try with your SIM card, and reboot again. Historically on Pixels, most of the time you can toggle OEM unlocking immediately, but occasionally some users have found it took a little while after being either connected to Wi-Fi or having your SIM card installed in it, and then eventually (hours? day? days?) you can toggle OEM unlocking.

The rest of the world's carriers:
No idea. Feel free to ask in the thread and hopefully, someone with specific knowledge will answer.

Other than trying the things I mentioned above, there is nothing else that anyone on XDA can do to help get OEM unlocking to be ungrayed.

Unlocking Bootloader (required in order to root)
The one-time first steps are:
  1. Android Settings
  2. About phone
  3. Click on Build number repeatedly, about seven times
  4. Go back to the main Android Settings
  5. System
  6. Developer options
    • Toggle OEM unlocking on. See @Namelesswonder's tip below (this won't help with variants that are supposed to be bootloader locked):
      Also a little tip for anyone trying to enable OEM unlocking on a device and it is grayed out, you can force the phone to check for eligibility by connecting to the internet in whatever way, going to the dialer, and dialing *#*#2432546#*#* (CHECKIN).
      You should receive a notification from Google Play services with "checkin succeeded" and OEM unlocking should be available immediately if the device is eligible.
      Google account not needed, SIM not needed, no other setup required. Works on completely-skipped-setup-wizard. Just need to make sure to connect to the internet and select the connection as metered to avoid any updates.
    • Toggle USB debugging on.
    • [Optional] I highly suggest you also disable Automatic system updates. Note that in a situation such as the Android 12 serious bootloader security issue, this setting will not keep Google from forcing an update to come through anyway.
  7. How to actually root follows the same steps below as how to update each month.
  8. Download the latest ADB/Fastboot (SDK Platform Tools) and Windows USB Drivers.
  9. Unzip the Platform Tools and Drivers.
  10. NOTE: If you have USB drivers for other Android devices installed, like Samsung, they can alternately sometimes work and not work with Google Pixels. I recommend uninstalling those drivers, or at least updating that driver to Google's driver as instructed below (the Device Manager entry may be different with other OEMs).​

  11. The Windows USB Drivers may have to be installed twice:
    • The first time while your phone is running and unlocked as normal.
      1. In Windows, right-click on the Start Button and choose Device Manager.
      2. Plug your phone into the computer and look for the new hardware entry in Device Manager. Near the top of Device Manager should be Android Device. Click the drop-down arrow to the left of it.
      3. Below Android Device, it should now show Android Composite ADB Interface
      4. Right-click the Android Composite ADB Interface and choose Update driver
      5. Choose Browse my computer for drivers
      6. Click Browse and navigate to where you unzipped the Windows USB drivers to.
      7. Follow the prompts to install the driver.
      8. Keep Device Manager itself open - you'll need it again in a minute, but you can close any other Device Manager windows after you have installed the driver.
      9. Open a Command Prompt and navigate to the platform-tools folder.
      10. Run command:
        Code:
        adb devices
      11. On your Android device, you'll get an ADB prompt. Check the box to always give ADB permission and click OK.
      12. Confirm that the command results in a list of Android devices. When doing these producedures, you should only have the one device you want to work on connected, to keep things simple.
    • The second time to install the driver is while the phone is in Bootloader (fastboot mode), notFastbootD (fastbootd) mode. I know it's confusing.
      • Run command:
        Code:
        adb reboot bootloader
      • Repeat the instructions above starting with "Right-click the Android Composite ADB Interface".
        • This second time installing the drivers while in Bootloader (fastboot mode), it will show up as "Android Bootloader Interface". Thanks @simplepinoi177 for the suggestion to add this detail.
  12. Run command:
    Code:
    fastboot flashing unlock
  13. On the phone, press either the up or down volume button once until you see Unlock the bootloader |>| beside the power button.
  14. Press the power button. The phone will go black for a second and then show near the bottom Device state: unlocked.
  15. After these first-time steps to unlock the bootloader, if you want to root, continue below at the step:
How to update each month (and also how to root) [requires an unlocked bootloader for updating via this factory image method]
  1. These three instructions only apply if you're already rooted and updating from one firmware version to another:
    • Made sure all Magisk Modules have been updated.
    • Disable all Magisk Modules.
    • UNhide Magisk!
  2. If you are going to use the Official Google Android Flash Tool, then skip the steps I indicate with FAB (Flash-All.Bat).
    • If using the Android Flash Tool to update/dirty flash, you should have the following items not selected:
      • Deselect Wipe
      • Deselect Force Flash all partitions (which will also wipe)
      • Deselect re-lock bootloader
  3. Always use the latest ADB/Fastboot (SDK Platform Tools) and Windows USB Drivers.
  4. Unzip the Platform Tools.
  5. Download the latest Pixel 7 Pro Factory Image (at the bottom of the "Cheetah" section).
  6. Unzip the factory image to the same platform-tools folder, i.e. so that flash-all.bat and all other files are in the same folder as ADB and Fastboot from the platform-tools.
  7. * FAB VERY important - Edit the flash-all.bat (on Windows) or flash-all.sh (on Linux) and remove the -w from the fastboot update image-cheetah-etcetera.zip line. This will keep the script from wiping your phone when you run it.
  8. Extract only the init_boot.img file from the image-cheetah-etcetera.zip to the same platform-tools folder.
  9. Copy the init_boot.img from the PC to the phone's internal storage.
  10. * FAB Run commands:
    Code:
    adb reboot bootloader
    flash-all.bat (on Windows)
    or
    flash-all.sh (on Linux)
    
    (Note:  At least two Apple Macintosh users had trouble using the flash-all.sh - at least one of those users, everything went smooth once they used a Windows PC for this part of the process)

    IMPORTANT - The flash-all will take several minutes and reboot on its own several times including to a mode called "FastbootD", and finally reboot into full Android when it's done. Do not interrupt this process. On the FastbootD screen on the phone, do not use any of the manual selection options - let the flash-all script do it's work. Do not unplug your phone until it has fully booted into Android.​

    Thanks to @PurppleMonkey and @xgerryx for suggesting a warning about this. Thanks to @simplepinoi177 for suggesting the "FastbootD" clarification.
  11. On the phone:
    • Wait for the phone to boot normally. Unlock the phone.
    • OPTIONAL: If you want to flash both slots, after this first time, then after do the following:

      • Code:
        adb reboot bootloader
        fastboot --set-active=other
        fastboot reboot bootloader
        flash-all.bat
      So you're doing the flash-all.bat a second time on the second slot.
    • Apply Magisk Stable to it. NOTE: It is always possible that an Android Update (Monthly, QPR [Quarterly Platform Release], new major Android versions, and Beta versions) might need a new version of Magisk Stable, Beta, or Canary from GitHub to work correctly. XDA forum for Magisk is here.
      • Launch the Magisk app.
      • Beside "Magisk", click "Install".
      • Click "Select and Patch a File", and choose the init_boot.img that you just copied to the phone's storage.
  12. Copy the Magisk'd init_boot.img (filename similar to magisk_patched-25200_1a2B3c.img)back over to the computer.
  13. Open a Command Prompt and navigate to the platform-tools folder.
  14. Run command:
    Code:
    adb reboot bootloader
  15. After phone has rebooted into Bootloader (Fastboot) mode, run command:
    Code:
    fastboot flash init_boot magisk_patched-25200_1a2B3c.img
    fastboot reboot
  16. Confirm that the phone boots completely normally.
  17. Cautiously re-enable Magisk Modules.
  18. Reboot.
  19. Confirm everything worked fine.
  20. If the phone won't boot correctly after having enabled Magisk Modules, see either of the two solutions below:
    • For the future, you don't need to go into safe mode unless that's your preference. I forgot what all it resets, but it's many settings and it's bothersome. I'd rather just reinstall my modules and not have to figure out those Android settings/changes which I come across days or weeks later when I infrequently do something. Have your phone reboot and run this:
      Code:
      adb wait-for-device shell magisk --remove-modules
      I like to just do this first:
      Code:
      adb devices
      So the server is running, then I have the long one pasted and ready to go once the phone turns off.
    • Find problem apps or Magisk Modules by rebooting to safe mode section in my next post. After following that link, you may have to scroll up a little bit and the section title will be highlighted.

SafetyNet:

New Universal SafetyNet Fix released by @Displax, which is a later minor revision of the test MOD version previously posted in this thread, and of the original MOD 2.0 which apparently had some typos - the latter which didn't work due to the typos but is now fixed if you download the latest one. You can get it either from XDA or on GitHub.
  1. Launch the Magisk app.
  2. Go to Magisk's Settings (Gear in top right).
    • Click Hide the Magisk app.
    • When you hide it, you'll have the optional opportunity to change the Magisk app's name to whatever you wish. It doesn't have to be complex to fool apps that check for Magisk.
    • Important: When you have the Magisk app hidden or renamed, you can accidentally install a new copy of Magisk. This situation won't work at all - neither copy of Magisk will work with two installed. This is one reason why I don't completely hide Magisk, so I can tell it's installed because I have it renamed as something easily recognizable.
    • Back to the Magisk app's Settings...
    • Click Systemless hosts. This adds a Magisk Module to Magisk, which you can verify in a later step.
    • Toggle Zygisk on.
    • Toggle Enforce DenyList on.
    • Click Configure DenyList.
      • Add every app that you want to explicitly deny root and the existence of root.
      • You can click the 3-dot menu and choose the options to display system and/or OS apps, if necessary.
      • Note that for many apps, it is not enough to click the single checkmark to the right of the app name in this list. For many but not all apps, you should click on the app name and you'll see it expand to two or more entries, each with its own toggles. In this expanded state, you can now check the single top checkbox beside the main app name and it'll toggle all individual sub-entries.
      • Some apps add new entries to this list from time to time, so if you find that an app used to work for you when rooted and doesn't now, check this list again and look for the entries that aren't fully checked. There will be an incomplete horizontal line above the apps that don't have all of their sub-entries toggled.
      • You can use the Search button at the top of this list to find specific apps quickly.
      • The most common apps you should definitely fully check in this list are:
        • IMPORTANT - There are some things, such as Google Play Services which it's fine to add to the DenyList, but it's perfectly normal when used in combination with the Universal SafetyNet Fix (USNF) that it is back to being unchecked the next time you visit the DenyList. Since USNF takes care of Google Play Services, you don't even have to add it to the DenyList in the first place.​

        • Google Play Store
        • Google Services Framework
        • Google Play Protect Service
        • Wallet
        • GPay
        • Any banking apps.
        • Any streaming apps that use DRM.
        • Any 2FA apps, especially those for work.
        • Some of those Google apps might not need denying, but it doesn't hurt to deny them.
        • Any time you toggle more entries in this list, it may be necessary to reboot the phone for it to take effect.
  3. From the main screen in the Magisk app, go to Modules at the bottom.
  4. Confirm that the Systemless hosts Magisk Module is added to this list, and enabled.
  5. Install the Magisk Module: Universal SafetyNet Fix. For now, use @Displax new Universal SafetyNet Fix, which is a later minor revision of the test MOD version previously posted in this thread, and of the original MOD 2.0 which apparently had some typos - the latter which didn't work due to the typos but is now fixed if you download the latest one. You can get it either from XDA or on GitHub.
  6. Reboot.
  7. Install from the Play Store:
    • YASNAC - SafetyNet Checker
      • Launch it.
      • Click Run SafetyNet Attestation.
      • It should say:
        • Basic integrity: Pass
        • CTS profile match: Pass
        • Evaluation type: BASIC
    • Play Integrity API Checker
      • Launch it.
      • Click Check.
      • It should have the following with a green checkmark:
        • MEETS_DEVICE_INTEGRITY
        • MEETS_BASIC_INTEGRITY
      • It's normal for MEETS_STRONG_INTEGRITY to have a red X.
    • You don't have to keep these installed, although I keep them handy.
    • Sometimes, clearing app cache and/or data for apps like the Google Play Store, GPay, Wallet and others (and then rebooting) after these steps may help pass SafetyNet as well.
  8. See @V0latyle's explanation (and further linked post) for why we can't achieve STRONG_INTEGRITY with an unlocked bootloader.

Optional steps when updating - flashing custom kernels:
  • Download the custom kernel of choice on the phone.
    • Be sure to read the particular installation instructions in the kernel threads' OP - any instructions in their OPs takes priority over anything I say here, which is generalized.​

      For now even the AK3 Zip versions of custom kernels requires Verity and Verification to be disabled.
      How to determine if you already have Verity and Verification disabled - see section in Post #3 - Other, most important resources
    • The two schools of thought on disabling Verity and Verification:
      • My post here. If you want to discuss it any, please do so in my thread, or at least not in that custom kernel thread, so as to keep the thread on-topic.
  • Extract the vbmeta.img file from the inner Zip of the factory image zip and put it in the same folder with the latest extracted platform-tools.
  • Hook the phone up to your computer and run the following commands:

    • Code:
      adb reboot bootloader
      [wait for the phone to reboot to bootloader (fastboot mode)]
      Code:
      fastboot flash vbmeta vbmeta.img --disable-verity
      fastboot reboot
  • Unlock the phone once it's booted up.
  • Make sure the Kernel Flasher app is up to date. XDA thread for the Kernel Flasher app is here.
  • Launch Kernel Flasher.
  • Select the slot that's mounted.
  • Choose Flash AK3 Zip.
  • Select the custom kernel zip just downloaded.
  • When it's done flashing, head to Android Settings and perform a Factory Reset, as is currently needed for Despair kernel.
  • If you failed to disable Verity and Verification ahead of time, if you have to, just force the phone off using these instructions: Turn your Pixel phone on & off, then press the Volume Down and Power buttons for a couple of seconds to get into the bootloader (fastboot mode). You'll still have to factory reset after disabling Verity in combination with this kernel, for now.
  • Whenever you use the flash-all to flash your phone, as long as you want to continue to disable Verity and Verification, you'll have to further modify the flash-all script as such:

    • Code:
      fastboot update image-cheetah-buildnumber.zip --disable-verity --disable-verification

ADB/Fastboot & Windows USB Drivers:

Platform Tools was updated in August 2022 to v33.0.3:
Windows: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-windows.zip
Mac: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-darwin.zip
Linux: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-linux.zip

Release Notes https://developer.android.com/studio/releases/platform-tools:

33.0.3 (Aug 2022)​

  • adb
    • Don't retry adb root if first attempt failed.
    • Fix track-devices duplicate entry.
    • Add receive windowing (increase throughput on high-latency connections).
    • More specific error messages in the "more than one device" failure cases.
    • Reject unexpected reverse forward requests.
    • Fix install-multi-package on Windows.
  • fastboot
    • Remove e2fsdroid as part of SDK platform-tools.
    • Print OemCmdHandler return message on success.
You'll need this if you're going to unlock the bootloader on your Pixel 7 Pro: SDK Platform Tools (download links for Windows, Mac, and Linux). Note that you can find links to download the tools elsewhere, but I wouldn't trust them - you never know if they've been modified. Even if the person providing the link didn't do anything intentionally, the tools could be modified without them being aware. Why take a chance of putting your phone security further at risk?

You can alternately use the tools from the SDK Manager, but most of us will want to stick to the basic tools-only without the complications of the full development manager.
For Windows, get Google's drivers here Get the Google USB Driver (ADB will likely work while the phone is fully booted, but if you're like me, you'll need these drivers for after you adb reboot-bootloader, to be able to use ADB and Fastboot.
 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member

Other, most important resources


A list of other important apps: - be sure to thank the respective OPs:
How to unroot
One of these two options:
  1. Official Google Android Flash Tool (OEM Unlocking needs to be toggled on - you do not have to manually unlock the bootloader - their site will do that on its own).
    Select the options to:
    • Wipe
    • Force flash all partitions
    • Re-lock bootloader
  2. Flash the completely stock init_boot.img from the same firmware version that you're on:
    Code:
    adb reboot bootloader
    fastboot flash init_boot init_boot.img

TWRP [not made for the Pixel 7 (or 6) Pro yet - will update when or if ever it has - don't hold your breath]
I would guess that this should be the appropriate URL for official TWRP custom recovery for the Pixel 7 Pro, but who knows when/if that will actually be made available, and it may become available unofficially in these forum sections before being made official. I'll adjust this URL as needed. https://twrp.me/google/googlepixel7pro.html.

Factory Images (requires an unlocked bootloader)
It's also handy to have to the full official firmware available, whether it's to recover from accidents or for actual development. Note the official link to the general Factory Images for Nexus and Pixel Devices page. The following link goes directly to the Pixel 7 Pro (Cheetah) section: Pixel 7 Pro Factory Images. I prefer to actually bookmark a link to the device listed immediately below the device I want the firmware for, because Google dumbly (in my opinion) puts the latest firmware at the bottom of the list for each particular device, and that ends up making you scroll a lot after a year or two of monthly updates.

Full OTA Images (doesn't require an unlocked bootloader - you can ask questions in this thread, but I won't be providing the steps necessary, as I always use the factory image)

Check warranty status - *may* reveal if a phone is refurbished, only if the phone was refurbished through Google - thanks to @Alekos for making me aware of the site.

Official Google Pixel Update and Software Repair (reported as of January 23, 2022 to still not be updated for the Pixel 6/Pro - no idea if it has yet now, or if it will be for the 7/Pro)

Official Google Pixel Install fingerprint calibration software (also available at the bottom of the Update and Software Repair page above) - I believe this is only helpful if you've replaced the screen - if it's anything like the Pixel 6 Pro: if you have the screen replaced, then you *must* have the fingerprint reader replaced as well.

Find problem apps or Magisk Modules by rebooting to safe mode
Google's Help Page for Find problem apps by rebooting to safe mode - this can be a lifesaver and keep you from having to do a restore to 100% complete stock or even from having to do a factory reset. This will deactivate all Magisk modules, and they'll remain deactivated even after you boot normally after briefly booting to safe mode. You can re-enable the Magisk modules as you wish to try to narrow down the problem if it was caused by a Magisk module. This can even get things working again after a Magisk Module wasn't finished installing and potentially causing a bootloop.
You can also follow @Jon8RFC's advice:
For the future, you don't need to go into safe mode unless that's your preference. I forgot what all it resets, but it's many settings and it's bothersome. I'd rather just reinstall my modules and not have to figure out those Android settings/changes which I come across days or weeks later when I infrequently do something. Have your phone reboot and run this:
Code:
adb wait-for-device shell magisk --remove-modules
I like to just do this first:
Code:
adb devices
So the server is running, then I have the long one pasted and ready to go once the phone turns off.

Worked for me yesterday when I accidentally tried some old version of a Magisk Module. You have to reinstall your Magisk Modules, but if you're using a third-party widget, it won't disable them like Safe mode does.

Official Google Android Flash Tool (OEM Unlocking needs to be toggled on - you do not have to manually unlock the bootloader - their site will do that on its own)
OEM unlocking in developer options needs to be toggled on. I don't "believe" you have to actually do the "fastboot flashing unlock" command.

How to determine if you already have Verity and Verification disabled (required for custom kernels for now)
I keep seeing this asked, so I added a Magisk module for it to the linked Github release. With the module installed, you can just run:

Code:
su
avbctl get-verity
avbctl get-verification

I spent way more time debugging that I downloaded Github's HTML of the update-binary script rather than the raw file than I care to admit. 🤦‍♂️ Off to bed.
Alternative two more manual ways of checking:
Since you´re probably already rooted anyway if you plan to flash this kernel, simply reboot your device. After you enter the device immediately take a kernel log with for example EXKM or any other app that allows to do that, terminal, etc.

Look for that line
[ 1.273480] init: [libfs_avb]AVB HASHTREE disabled on: /vendor_dlkm

If you see this line, verity/verification should be disabled.
I've seen several cases where having the ability to check would have been handy, so I pushed an avbctl binary built against the latest aosp sources here.

The simplest way to use it would be the following:

Code:
adb push avbctl /data/local/tmp
adb shell
su
cd /data/local/tmp
chmod +x avbctl
./avbctl get-verity
./avbctl get-verification
 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Google Pixel Updates (more user-friendly to read than Pixel Update Bulletins):


Kush M.
Community Manager•Original Poster
Oct 6, 2022

The Pixel 7 and 7 Pro are here!​

Announcement
Hi Pixel Community,

Earlier this year, we gave you a sneak peak at the newest devices in the Pixel line up. Well, we’re excited to officially introduce you to the Pixel 7 and 7 Pro! You can learn more about the Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro check out our latest blog post, and find the tech specs here.

Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro are now available for pre-order in the US, UK, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Ireland, Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Japan, Australia, Singapore, Taiwan and India (1) starting today and will launch on October 13. You can pre-order your Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro on the Google Store and Google Fi.

Disclaimers:
(1)
The Pixel 7 and Pixel 7 Pro will be available in India through Flipkart.
Details
Other
 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Pixel Update Bulletins:


Pixel Update Bulletin—October 2022​

bookmark_border
Published October 3, 2022
The Pixel Update Bulletin contains details of security vulnerabilities and functional improvements affecting supported Pixel devices (Google devices). For Google devices, security patch levels of 2022-10-05 or later address all issues in this bulletin and all issues in the October 2022 Android Security Bulletin. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, see Check and update your Android version.
All supported Google devices will receive an update to the 2022-10-05 patch level. We encourage all customers to accept these updates to their devices.
Note: The Google device firmware images are available on the Google Developer site.

Announcements​

  • In addition to the security vulnerabilities described in the October 2022 Android Security Bulletin, Google devices also contain patches for the security vulnerabilities described below.

Security patches​

Vulnerabilities are grouped under the component that they affect. There is a description of the issue and a table with the CVE, associated references, type of vulnerability, severity, and updated Android Open Source Project (AOSP) versions (where applicable). When available, we link the public change that addressed the issue to the bug ID, like the AOSP change list. When multiple changes relate to a single bug, additional references are linked to numbers following the bug ID.

Pixel​

CVEReferencesTypeSeverityComponent
CVE-2022-20231A-211485702 *EoPCriticalTrusty
CVE-2022-20364A-233606615 *EoPCriticalKernel
CVE-2022-20397A-223086933 *EoPHighlibsitril-se
CVE-2022-20464A-236042696 *IDHighAudio processor

Qualcomm components​

CVEReferencesSeveritySubcomponent
CVE-2022-22078A-228096042
QC-CR#2784147 [2]
ModerateBootloader
CVE-2022-25664A-228095839
QC-CR#3092515
ModerateDisplay
CVE-2022-25666A-228095650
QC-CR#3097037
ModerateKernel

Qualcomm closed-source components​

CVEReferencesSeveritySubcomponent
CVE-2022-25662A-228096097 *ModerateClosed-source component
CVE-2022-25665A-228096044 *ModerateClosed-source component

Functional patches​

For details on the new bug fixes and functional patches included in this release, refer to the Pixel Community forum.

Common questions and answers​

This section answers common questions that may occur after reading this bulletin.
1. How do I determine if my device is updated to address these issues?
Security patch levels of 2022-10-05 or later address all issues associated with the 2022-10-05 security patch level and all previous patch levels. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, read the instructions on the Google device update schedule.
2. What do the entries in the Type column mean?
Entries in the Type column of the vulnerability details table reference the classification of the security vulnerability.
AbbreviationDefinition
RCERemote code execution
EoPElevation of privilege
IDInformation disclosure
DoSDenial of service
N/AClassification not available
3. What do the entries in the References column mean?
Entries under the References column of the vulnerability details table may contain a prefix identifying the organization to which the reference value belongs.
PrefixReference
A-Android bug ID
QC-Qualcomm reference number
M-MediaTek reference number
N-NVIDIA reference number
B-Broadcom reference number
U-UNISOC reference number
4. What does an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column mean?
Issues that are not publicly available have an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column. The update for that issue is generally contained in the latest binary drivers for Pixel devices available from the Google Developer site.
5. Why are security vulnerabilities split between this bulletin and the Android Security Bulletins?
Security vulnerabilities that are documented in the Android Security Bulletins are required to declare the latest security patch level on Android devices. Additional security vulnerabilities, such as those documented in this bulletin are not required for declaring a security patch level.

Versions​

VersionDateNotes
1.0October 3, 2022Bulletin Published
 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Regarding P7P 5G model numbers and capabilities, and how to determine your hardware version:

Source 1
Source 2 - Thanks to @xike456 for the additional information

There are two hardware versions in the United States:
  • GP4BC
    • 5G Sub 6GHz
    • UMTS/HSPA+/HSDPA: Bands 1,2,4,5,6,8,19
    • LTE: Bands B1/2/3/4/5/7/8/12/13/14/17/18/19/20/25/26/28/29/30/32/38/39/40/41/46/48/66/71
    • 5G Sub-620: Bands n1/2/3/5/7/8/12/14/20/25/28/30/38/40/41/48/66/71/75/76/77/78
  • GE2AE
    • 5G mmWave + Sub 6GHz
    • GSM/EDGE: Quad-band (850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz)
    • UMTS/HSPA+/HSDPA: Bands 1,2,4,5,6,8,19
    • LTE: Bands B1/2/3/4/5/7/8/12/13/14/17/18/19/20/25/26/28/29/30/38/39/40/41/42/46/48/66/71
    • 5G Sub-620: Bands n1/2/3/5/7/8/12/14/20/25/28/30/38/40/41/48/66/71/77/78
    • 5G mmWave20: Bands n257/n258/n260/n261
Two other hardware versions. Not sure where they are distributed - possibly in Canada:
  • GVU6C
    • 5G Sub 6GHz
  • GQML3
    • 5G mmWave + Sub 6GHz
    • No other information is known
Two more hardware versions. Not sure where they are distributed, but Japan is one::
  • G03Z5 - information comes from here. For some reason lumped in with Model GVU6C above at that link and considered the same model.
    • 5G Sub 6GHz
  • GFE4J - information comes from here. For some reason lumped in with Model GE2AE above at that link and considered the same model.
Thanks to @xike456 for the additional information above, and provided in their post:
Here is my 7 pro model number: GFE4J
I found some info about this here.
unroot.
photo_2022-10-24_07-58-59-jpg.5741993

Thanks to @xstefen for providing this link:

How to determine your hardware version:
Settings>About Phone>Regulatory Labels

Carrier/Color/Storage model numbers (gotten from Best Buy):
  • Unlocked:
    • Obsidian
      • 128GB - GA03453-US
      • 256GB - GA03456-US
      • 512GB - GA03459-US
    • Hazel
      • 128GB - GA03455-US
      • 256GB - GA03458-US
      • 512GB - GA03461-US
    • Snow
      • 128GB - GA03454-US
      • 256GB - GA03457-US
      • 512GB - GA03460-US
  • Sprint:
    • Obsidian - 128GB - GA03443-US
    • Hazel - 128GB - GA03445-US
    • Snow - 128GB - GA03444-US
  • Verizon:
    • Obsidian
      • 128GB - GA03414-US
      • 256GB - GA03417-US
    • Hazel - 128GB - GA03416-US
    • Snow - 128GB - GA03415-US
  • T-Mobile
    • Obsidian - 128GB - GA03443-US
    • Hazel - 128GB - GA03445-US
    • Snow - 128GB - GA03444-US
  • No idea about AT&T model numbers - Google's site lists the carrier in their Store, but looks like Best Buy doesn't sell them.
Thanks, @Sib64!
Obsidian - 256GB - GA03465-GB - solded by Sosh France
 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Post #7 Pro 😜

My personal advice for how to get your device back up and running as you had it before a factory reset:
  1. I use Nova Launcher Prime, so I do backups anytime I change my home screen or app drawer/tabs setup, so widgets and app icons and other Nova-specific configurations are easier to restore.
  2. Go to Android Settings and use Settings' search box for Backup. Make sure that your Google account is set up to backup your apps (and app data for the apps that developers have configured to use Google's Backup API). Make sure things are backed up. Note, this doesn't backup the apps themselves, only the list of apps, so only applies to apps installed from the Play Store. As I said in parentheses, developers have to choose to integrate Google's Backup API into their app, and those apps only will get their app data backed up into Google's cloud.
  3. If you're rooted also, then you could use something like Swift Backup to backup to the cloud. I do so, although I still restore as much as possible through Google's backup, and I only restore through Swift on a case-by-case basis, as needed when I discover an app that's tough to set back up doesn't have it's data restored by Google.
  4. If you've used Google Photos to backup your photos to Google's cloud, then hit the button in Google Photos to free up space. This will automatically and only delete your local copies of photos and videos that it's already backed up.
  5. Once that ^ is done, look at your internal storage with your favorite File Manger and see if there's anything left that you want to back up manually, since a factory reset will wipe everything. Copy them to your computer or a flash drive.
  6. When you're just starting the out of the box setup after the reset, when it asks you if you want to use a cable to restore things from an old phone, choose No, and that will lead you to Google's cloud backup where you can choose to restore everything, or you can select what you want to restore.
  7. I think you can figure out the rest.
Also see Post #3 - Other, most important resources:
  • A list of other important apps
 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member

October 2022:​


Sunday, October 23, 2022: Thanks to @xike456 for additional hardware model number information, which you can find in Post #6 - Regarding P7P 5G model numbers and capabilities, and how to determine your hardware version.

Saturday, October 15, 2022: New Universal SafetyNet Fix released by @Displax, which is a later minor revision of the test MOD version previously posted in this thread, and of the original MOD 2.0 which apparently had some typos - the latter which didn't work due to the typos but is now fixed if you download the latest one. You can get it either from XDA or on GitHub.

Monday, October 14, 2022: A custom kernel is released for the Pixel 7 Pro:

Thursday, October 13, 2022: Pixel 7 Pro Factory Image is up! TD1A.220804.031 is confirmed to be the zero-day update, so is the most recent. Thanks to @bosox284 for confirming.
VersionFlashDownloadSHA-256 Checksum
13.0.0 (TD1A.220804.009.A2, Oct 2022)FlashLink8e7393e1bd7f86d76d75cdea988d5e4ebfded3a50fac26d774b9eb07152c1ed5
13.0.0 (TD1A.220804.009.A5, Oct 2022, JP carriers)FlashLinkc68659bdd1d2b0b9a1740daa1502acbbf1b535be5b7e5bada157c82ef5fbf5c5
13.0.0 (TD1A.220804.031, Oct 2022)FlashLink6152f6f3d8437be0ef840ed7056f15d0f52ba181a1d029ff84bd9d83c860d49f

Thursday, October 13, 2022: The following URL that @mariusnoor found is the OTA update that gets applied to the Pixel 7 Pro's original firmware. i.e. This isn't a firmware zip that we can use to root the init_boot.img, but if anyone who receives their Pixel 7 Pro doesn't get this OTA right away, you should be able to apply this OTA with or without an unlocked bootloader. I have the SHA-256 hash of the 674427f7501c86422e9b502666af8a47cbd3cff7.zip as:
Code:
280187417316DAEDD18D69027EC101DF6916030A0BB4BF1C2AFCB033257AD9AB
(for double-checking the OTA zip is intact)
Got the URL:

Pixel 7 Pro (Europe)


Edit: If you want to sniff it yourself, reset your phone completely, start it, enable USB debugging, log everything using logcat and then you'll find the URL.

1665580177502-png.5732921
here we go ;)
 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
@roirraW "edor" ehT
You upgraded to the Pixel 7 Pro ?
Yes, sir! The USB 3.2 Gen 2 pushed me over the edge, believe it or not. I like to copy hundreds of gigs of FLAC music to my devices all the time.

Way to go @roirraW "edor" ehT!!

Let's get this party started!!! :)
😁

Glad to see you in the Pixel 7 pro forums! @roirraW "edor" ehT
Thanks! Would you believe I only one other time upgraded to a next up higher model of any phone - the last time being from the Sprint Samsung Galaxy S2/Epic 4G to the Verizon S3, and both phones had already been out for long enough to be a great deal under contract back then.

EDIT: I was wrong. The Pixel 6 was released on Oct. 28, 2021 and the factory images were released the same day. Pre-orders for the Pixel 6 began on Oct. 19, if I remember correctly.
That is exactly correct from my memory, too.
 

rester555

Senior Member
Oct 27, 2010
569
262
Google Pixel 6 Pro
Yes, sir! The USB 3.2 Gen 2 pushed me over the edge, believe it or not. I like to copy hundreds of gigs of FLAC music to my devices all the time.


😁


Thanks! Would you believe I only one other time upgraded to a next up higher model of any phone - the last time being from the Sprint Samsung Galaxy S2/Epic 4G to the Verizon S3, and both phones had already been out for long enough to be a great deal under contract back then.


That is exactly correct from my memory, too.
I/O controllers are so necessary and not many people talk about that with phones. I hate how slow transfer speeds are with subpar hardware.

My next move in house is to convert everything to wifi 7. 6E is not a big enough jump from wifi 5. Also wired 10 gbE everywhere or higher.

I have a NAS video server for the house and there is nothing out there to do better than 2.5 gbE. I am waiting for better hardware to make my house 10 gbE.
 
Last edited:

roirraW "edor" ehT

Forum Moderator
Staff member
I/O controllers are so necessary and not many people talk about that with phones. I hate how slow transfer speeds are with subpar hardware.
Absolutely! Especially these phones without MicroSD card slots, it just makes it worse - not that MicroSD cards are the complete solution, either. Especially if you don't want to take your phone case off, take out the card, put it back in later...

My next move in house is to convert everything to wifi 7. 6E is not a big enough jump from wifi 5. Also wired 10 gbE everywhere or higher.
I went 6E in the last couple of weeks only because all Synology routers including their newest don't work directly with Frontier Fiber's gigabit ONT - they've got a serious bug and I worked with Synology for a month without any progress. I became completely burned out on continuously experimenting with my networking. To Synology's credit, they bent over backward and then even connected me directly with their developers, but I just couldn't take it anymore.

At some point, I felt I should start getting paid to help them debug their product, and at another point, I just have to continue on with life and just use my network without plugging / unplugging / factory resetting, you name it, every day.

I went with two high-end gaming Asus routers (I don't game, though) and they have been the easiest to set up and have no issues at all.

[/mini-rant]

I have a NAS video server for the house and there is nothing out there to do better than 2.5 gbE. I am waiting for better hardware to make my house 10 gbE.
The Asus GT-AXE16000 - which I got a great deal on but it's still super expensive, has 2x10Gb, 1x2.5Gb, and 4x1Gb ports, and you can use any one or two of them as WAN, and it automatically makes the remaining LAN. Great flexibility. My second (mesh) router is their GT-AXE11000 - which I don't even remember if it has 10Gb, but probably does have one, and it definitely has 1x2.5Gb. I used each router's 2.5Gb for the mesh connection, although you can do so with Wi-Fi too if you wish. We have a small house but the opposite side of the house from my computer room can stand to have a little help for the best internet speeds, although the GT-AXE16000 by itself did quite well and much better than Synology's models.
 
Last edited:

rester555

Senior Member
Oct 27, 2010
569
262
Google Pixel 6 Pro
Absolutely! Especially these phones without MicroSD card slots, it just makes it worse - not that MicroSD cards are the complete solution, either. Especially if you don't want to take your phone case off, take out the card, put it back in later...


I went 6E in the last couple of weeks only because all Synology routers including their newest don't work directly with Frontier Fiber's gigabit ONT - they've got a serious bug and I worked with Synology for a month without any progress. I became completely burned out on continuously experimenting with my networking. To Synology's credit, they bent over backward and then even connected me directly with their developers, but I just couldn't take it anymore.

At some point, I felt I should start getting paid to help them debug their product, and at another point, I just have to continue on with life and just use my network without plugging / unplugging / factory resetting, you name it, every day.

I went with two high-end gaming Asus routers (I don't game, though) and they have been the easiest to set up and have no issues at all.

[/mini-rant]


The Asus GT-AXE16000 - which I got a great deal on but it's still super expensive, has 2x10Gb, 1x2.5Gb, and 4x1Gb ports, and you can use any one or two of them as WAN, and it automatically makes the remaining LAN. Great flexibility. My second (mesh) router is their GT-AXE11000 - which I don't even remember if it has 10Gb, but probably does have one, but it definitely has 1x2.5Gb, and I used each router's 2.5Gb for the mesh connection, although you can do so with Wi-Fi too if you wish. We have a small house but the opposite side of the house from my computer room can stand to have a little help for the best internet speeds, although the GT-AXE16000 by itself did quite well and much better than Synology's models.
Understood on the gt-axe16000, it's great, but Wifi 7 combines all channels 2.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 6 GHz into a 320 MHz bandpass channel. With 6E, you can only get half that. It's almost there but I can wait another 2 years. Then my desktop, phones, and routers will all be converted. 😀
 

Top Liked Posts

  • There are no posts matching your filters.
  • 11
    All: I'm a bit overwhelmed right now with real-life work and other responsibilities. I hope you all can continue to help each other in my absence, and that I don't have to stay away too long. Thank you.
    7
    Question: I'm guessing whatever magisk / lsposed modules will need to be reapplied? Is there a process that people do?

    Or do they automatically get re-applied after a dirty flash?
    This is my update path every month: I disable verity and verification and also uses a custom kernel so YMMV. I'm also rooted.

    MAKE A BACK-UP of anything important
    ** Check if platform tools are up to date!! **
    ** Disable Magisk Hide!! **
    ** Disable Magisk modules!! **
    ** Disable Substratum overlays!! **

    1- Within the Platform Tools folder, find the FLASH-ALL (.bat) file

    2- Open it with text editor and replace -w with --disable-verity --disable-verification in file (keep ONE space between commands)

    3- Verify FASTBOOT DEVICES by typing CMD in the address bar of the same platform tools folder

    4- adb reboot bootloader

    5- Type FLASH-ALL

    6- Let it boot into system and settle for a minute

    7- Patch the boot image:

    Connect your device and PC and put the extracted init_BOOT.img file (from the CURRENT factory image you are flashing) on your device where you can easily find it

    Open Magisk and choose SELECT AND PATCH FILE (select the init_BOOT.img you just put on your device)

    Copy the new PATCHED init_BOOT.img from your download folder back into your PLATFORM TOOLS folder where the fastboot application is located on your PC

    8- Boot device into fastboot/bootloader, connect device and PC

    9- Type fastboot flash init_boot --slot=all (drag and drop patched init_boot.img here OR type in the file name magisk_patched-xxxxxxxxxx.img)

    10- Reboot into System

    ** Flash custom kernel **
    7
    So, just be 100% clear. If we're not going to flash custom kernel, we don't need to worry about init_boot.img to update to Nov patch?
    Also, we can just uninstall magisk, update with the Android Flash Tool, install, then install Magisk to root again, right? Sorry, Post #2 is kinda confusing.
    The only thing you don't have to worry about if you're not going to flash a custom kernel it's disabling Verity and Verification (and wiping after).

    init_boot.img is the file you root with Magisk and then flash too the init_boot partition.

    Whether using the Android Flash Tool or the firmware image zip method, there's no need to uninstall Magisk, and doing so would just lead to more steps to re-root. Whichever of those two methods you use, you'll still need the firmware image zip because you need the init_boot.img file from the inner zip to re-root that file with Magisk.

    I'd be happy to modify the steps if you can help me figure where exactly needs adjustment. I'm constantly in search of ways to make things clearer.

    Thanks.
    6
    A lot of mixed information. Really long time ago was much easier to understand any tutorial. I looking for information how to update stock and don't lost root and don't turn on Verity or something like that.
    for those who may be a bit confused about the update process. I have put together a full walkthrough that covers the entire process.

    5
    Warning, multiple users in @siavash79's thread [MOD][Xposed+Magisk][Pre-Release] AOSP Mods - System modifications for AOSP-based Android 12+ have reported that using AOSP Mods option to enable quick-pin login (automatically unlocks after you enter the fourth digit) is broken on the November update on both Pixel 6 and 7 / Pro.

    Just turn off quick unlock. Most or all other options are working in the mod.
  • 51
    Monday & Tuesday, November 7 & 8, 2022: Pixel 7 Pro Factory Images available:
    13.0.0 (TD1A.221105.001, Nov 2022)FlashLinkf2793a62a48bc840b892e74dd515739b657d2727c25edd074064e3ab019e73bf
    13.0.0 (TD1A.221105.003, Nov 2022, Verizon, Verizon MVNOs)FlashLink021be73c7c602de0fdefcd3a4c43d0d745188b7847880a0d4a2ccb6aa64c47a6
    Tuesday, November 8, 2022: But I lump it in after the standard day's two images above.
    13.0.0 (TD1A.221105.001.A1, Nov 2022, Telia)FlashLink8c02369293402dc629728e0966d2ccc1976f513ed783ea2f64dcd1e55e221b3e
    Thanks @Namelesswonder!
    Much newer radio and modem on TD1A.221105.001.A1, even newer than QPR1 Beta 3.1.
    Firmware Image​
    Radio Version​
    TD1A.221105.001​
    radio-cheetah-g5300g-220908-220908-b-9040061​
    TD1A.221105.001.A1​
    radio-cheetah-g5300g-220908-221031-b-9238462
    TD1A.221105.003​
    radio-cheetah-g5300g-220908-221006-b-9144834​
    T1B3.221003.003​
    radio-cheetah-g5300g-220923-221001-b-9127780​
    T1B3.221003.008​
    radio-cheetah-g5300g-220923-221028-b-9229469

    Pixel Update Bulletin—November 2022​


    Published November 7, 2022
    The Pixel Update Bulletin contains details of security vulnerabilities and functional improvements affecting supported Pixel devices (Google devices). For Google devices, security patch levels of 2022-11-05 or later address all issues in this bulletin and all issues in the November 2022 Android Security Bulletin. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, see Check and update your Android version.
    All supported Google devices will receive an update to the 2022-11-05 patch level. We encourage all customers to accept these updates to their devices.
    Note: The Google device firmware images are available on the Google Developer site.

    Announcements​

    • In addition to the security vulnerabilities described in the November 2022 Android Security Bulletin, Google devices also contain patches for the security vulnerabilities described below.

    Security patches​

    Vulnerabilities are grouped under the component that they affect. There is a description of the issue and a table with the CVE, associated references, type of vulnerability, severity, and updated Android Open Source Project (AOSP) versions (where applicable). When available, we link the public change that addressed the issue to the bug ID, like the AOSP change list. When multiple changes relate to a single bug, additional references are linked to numbers following the bug ID.


    Pixel​

    CVEReferencesTypeSeveritySubcomponent
    CVE-2022-20459A-239556260 *EoPHighTitan M
    CVE-2022-20460A-239557547 *EoPHighTitan M

    Qualcomm closed-source components​

    CVEReferencesSeveritySubcomponent
    CVE-2022-25674A-231226928 *ModerateClosed-source component
    CVE-2022-25676A-231226556 *ModerateClosed-source component
    CVE-2022-25679A-215246183 *ModerateClosed-source component

    Functional patches​

    For details on the new bug fixes and functional patches included in this release, refer to the Pixel Community forum.


    Common questions and answers​

    This section answers common questions that may occur after reading this bulletin.


    1. How do I determine if my device is updated to address these issues?


    Security patch levels of 2022-11-05 or later address all issues associated with the 2022-11-05 security patch level and all previous patch levels. To learn how to check a device's security patch level, read the instructions on the Google device update schedule.


    2. What do the entries in the Type column mean?


    Entries in the Type column of the vulnerability details table reference the classification of the security vulnerability.


    AbbreviationDefinition
    RCERemote code execution
    EoPElevation of privilege
    IDInformation disclosure
    DoSDenial of service
    N/AClassification not available

    3. What do the entries in the References column mean?


    Entries under the References column of the vulnerability details table may contain a prefix identifying the organization to which the reference value belongs.


    PrefixReference
    A-Android bug ID
    QC-Qualcomm reference number
    M-MediaTek reference number
    N-NVIDIA reference number
    B-Broadcom reference number
    U-UNISOC reference number

    4. What does an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column mean?


    Issues that are not publicly available have an * next to the Android bug ID in the References column. The update for that issue is generally contained in the latest binary drivers for Pixel devices available from the Google Developer site.


    5. Why are security vulnerabilities split between this bulletin and the Android Security Bulletins?


    Security vulnerabilities that are documented in the Android Security Bulletins are required to declare the latest security patch level on Android devices. Additional security vulnerabilities, such as those documented in this bulletin are not required for declaring a security patch level.


    Versions​


    VersionDateNotes
    1.0November 7, 2022Bulletin Published

    Kush M.
    43 min. ago
    Google Pixel Update - November 2022
    Announcement

    Hello Pixel Community,

    We have provided the monthly software update for November 2022. All supported Pixel devices running Android 13 will receive these software updates starting today. The rollout will continue over the next week in phases depending on carrier and device. Users will receive a notification once the OTA becomes available for their device. We encourage you to check your Android version and update to receive the latest software.

    Details of this month’s security fixes can be found on the Android Security Bulletin: https://source.android.com/security/bulletin

    Thanks,
    Google Pixel Support Team


    Software versions

    Global
    • Pixel 4a: TP1A.221105.002
    • Pixel 4a (5G): TP1A.221105.002
    • Pixel 5: TP1A.221105.002
    • Pixel 5a (5G): TP1A.221105.002
    • Pixel 6: TP1A.221105.002
    • Pixel 6 Pro: TP1A.221105.002
    • Pixel 6a: TP1A.221105.002
    • Pixel 7: TD1A.221105.001
    • Pixel 7 Pro: TD1A.221105.001

    Verizon (US)
    • Pixel 7: TD1A.221105.003
    • Pixel 7 Pro: TD1A.221105.003

    What’s included

    The November 2022 update includes bug fixes and improvements for Pixel users – see below for details.

    Battery & Charging
    • Fix for issue causing increased power consumption while certain apps installed *[1]

    Display & Graphics
    • Fix for issue occasionally causing green display flicker in in certain conditions *[2]
    • Optimizations for display power consumption to improve thermal performance in certain conditions *[2]

    System
    • Fix for issue occasionally causing Photos app to crash when using certain editing features *[2]
    ---------------------------------------------------------------

    Device Applicability

    Fixes are available for all supported Pixel devices unless otherwise indicated below.

    *[1] Included on Pixel 6, Pixel 6 Pro & Pixel 6a
    *[2] Included on Pixel 7 & Pixel 7 Pro

    Details
    Other

    The answer to life, the universe, and everything.​

    1667221900824.jpeg
    (* I do not claim copyright to this image, nor do I benefit monetarily from it or these posts)

    Just kidding (the answer is 42, by the way):
    Here there be dragons. 🐉 I am not responsible for anything at all. 😹

    VERY IMPORTANT - On the Pixel 7/Pro, we use Magisk to patch init_boot.img, NOT boot.img AND we flash the patched init_boot to the init_boot partition - do not flash it to the boot partition.​

    Thanks to @edcsxz, @Lughnasadh, and @AndyYan for news about that and confirming it.

    Moved @mariusnoor's provided zero-day OTA.zip to Post #8 - Old news from the OP.

    Unlocking or locking the bootloader will wipe the device every single time, so be sure to have your data backed up before doing so, or better yet, just unlock it as soon as you get the device.​

    Keep in mind that unlocking the bootloader or rooting might affect your phone's capability to use banking apps such as Google Pay, your local bank's app, or even the ability to install some apps like NetFlix. See Post #2 - Unlocking Bootloader / Rooting / Updating | SafetyNet | ADB/Fastboot & Windows USB Drivers.​

    If you're going to re-lock the bootloader, make sure the ROM you have on your phone is completely stock (by flashing the latest official firmware) BEFORE re-locking it.​

    There are no permanent negative consequences if you unlock or re-lock the bootloader other than it will wipe your phone, and while your bootloader is unlocked you get a brief screen when you boot the phone telling you (and anyone who sees your phone at the time) that it's unlocked. You will also continue to receive updates (if you've merely unlocked the bootloader, you can take updates as normal) unlike Samsung, Sony, et cetera, which have permanent major consequences with reduced functionality even if you un-root and re-lock your bootloader. If you're actually rooted (not just bootloader unlocked), you'll have to perform extra steps to manually update each month, and to keep root/re-root.

    INDEX:

    • Post #2 - Unlocking Bootloader / Rooting / Updating | SafetyNet | ADB/Fastboot & Windows USB Drivers:
      • How to Root the first time / aka How to unlock the Bootloader
      • TL;DR - for the seasoned repeat users
        • Unlocking Bootloader (required in order to root)
        • How to update each month (and also how to root)[requires an unlocked bootloader for updating via this factory image method]
          • OPTIONAL: If you want to flash both slots, after this first time, then after do the following
        • SafetyNet
        • Optional steps when updating - flashing custom kernels
          • The two schools of thought on disabling Verity and Verification
      • ADB/Fastboot and Windows USB Drivers - direct download links and the most recent changelog
    • Post #3 - Other, most important resources:
      • A list of other important apps
      • TWRP [not made for the Pixel 7 (or 6) Pro yet - will update when or if ever it has - don't hold your breath]
      • Factory Images (requires an unlocked bootloader)
      • Full OTA Images(doesn't require an unlocked bootloader - you can ask questions in this thread, but I won't be providing the steps necessary, as I always use the factory image)
        • @mariusnoor's provided official URL to download the zero-day OTA to TD1A.220804.031.
      • Check warranty status
      • Official Google Pixel Update and Software Repair (reported as of January 23, 2022 to still not be updated for the Pixel 6/Pro - no idea if it has yet now, or if it will be for the 7/Pro)
      • Official Google Pixel Install fingerprint calibration software (also available at the bottom of the Update and Software Repair page above) - I believe this is only helpful if you've replaced the screen - if it's anything like the Pixel 6 Pro: if you have the screen replaced, then you *must* have the fingerprint reader replaced as well.
      • Find problem apps or Magisk Modules by rebooting to safe mode
      • Official Google Android Flash Tool (OEM Unlocking needs to be toggled on - you do not have to manually unlock the bootloader - their site will do that on its own)
      • How to determine if you already have Verity and Verification disabled (required for custom kernels for now)
      • How to unroot
    • Post #4 - Google Pixel Updates (more user-friendly to read than Pixel Update Bulletins) (nothing for the P7P yet)
      • Old Google posts/updates
    • Post #5 - Pixel Update Bulletins
      • Old Bulletins
    • Post #6 - Regarding P7P 5G model numbers and capabilities, and how to determine your hardware version
    • Post #7 - My personal advice for how to get your device back up and running as you had it before a factory reset
    • Post #8 - Old news from the OP

    Thank you to the following users who have all contributed greatly to my knowledge of Pixels since I came back to XDA a year ago after a few years of mostly inactivity. Apologies if I miss anybody. In alphabetical order:

    35

    Unlocking Bootloader / Rooting / Updating | SafetyNet | ADB/Fastboot & Windows USB Drivers


    Unlocking Bootloader / Rooting / Updating:

    How to Root the first time / aka How to unlock the Bootloader:
    Unlocking the bootloader will factory reset your device. There is no way around this. I highly suggest never re-locking your bootloader once you unlock it. If you do ever re-lock the bootloader, only do so after restoring the phone to 100% stock by using the latest Pixel 7 Pro Factory Image or Official Google Android Flash Tool.

    Verizon variants:
    Will never be able to have their bootloader unlocked. It's like winning the lottery, and just as rare and relatively random. There is nothing that anyone on XDA can do to help you unlock your Verizon variant.

    T-Mobile and AT&T variants:
    Can be unlocked once you pay the phone off, then you contact the carrier and arrange to Carrier unlock the phone. Once the phone is Carrier unlocked, then you can unlock the bootloader with the usual caveats (will wipe the device and there's no way around it).

    The direct-from-Google (or other retailers who aren't U.S. Carriers), the factory Carrier Unlocked Pixels:
    Can be bootloader unlocked at any time. I'd try it first before putting a SIM card in the phone. If OEM unlocking is grayed out, try connecting to Wi-Fi, and reboot if necessary. If it's still grayed out, try with your SIM card, and reboot again. Historically on Pixels, most of the time you can toggle OEM unlocking immediately, but occasionally some users have found it took a little while after being either connected to Wi-Fi or having your SIM card installed in it, and then eventually (hours? day? days?) you can toggle OEM unlocking.

    The rest of the world's carriers:
    No idea. Feel free to ask in the thread and hopefully, someone with specific knowledge will answer.

    Other than trying the things I mentioned above, there is nothing else that anyone on XDA can do to help get OEM unlocking to be ungrayed.

    Unlocking Bootloader (required in order to root)
    The one-time first steps are:
    1. Android Settings
    2. About phone
    3. Click on Build number repeatedly, about seven times
    4. Go back to the main Android Settings
    5. System
    6. Developer options
      • Toggle OEM unlocking on. See @Namelesswonder's tip below (this won't help with variants that are supposed to be bootloader locked):
        Also a little tip for anyone trying to enable OEM unlocking on a device and it is grayed out, you can force the phone to check for eligibility by connecting to the internet in whatever way, going to the dialer, and dialing *#*#2432546#*#* (CHECKIN).
        You should receive a notification from Google Play services with "checkin succeeded" and OEM unlocking should be available immediately if the device is eligible.
        Google account not needed, SIM not needed, no other setup required. Works on completely-skipped-setup-wizard. Just need to make sure to connect to the internet and select the connection as metered to avoid any updates.
      • Toggle USB debugging on.
      • [Optional] I highly suggest you also disable Automatic system updates. Note that in a situation such as the Android 12 serious bootloader security issue, this setting will not keep Google from forcing an update to come through anyway.
    7. How to actually root follows the same steps below as how to update each month.
    8. Download the latest ADB/Fastboot (SDK Platform Tools) and Windows USB Drivers.
    9. Unzip the Platform Tools and Drivers.
    10. NOTE: If you have USB drivers for other Android devices installed, like Samsung, they can alternately sometimes work and not work with Google Pixels. I recommend uninstalling those drivers, or at least updating that driver to Google's driver as instructed below (the Device Manager entry may be different with other OEMs).​

    11. The Windows USB Drivers may have to be installed twice:
      • The first time while your phone is running and unlocked as normal.
        1. In Windows, right-click on the Start Button and choose Device Manager.
        2. Plug your phone into the computer and look for the new hardware entry in Device Manager. Near the top of Device Manager should be Android Device. Click the drop-down arrow to the left of it.
        3. Below Android Device, it should now show Android Composite ADB Interface
        4. Right-click the Android Composite ADB Interface and choose Update driver
        5. Choose Browse my computer for drivers
        6. Click Browse and navigate to where you unzipped the Windows USB drivers to.
        7. Follow the prompts to install the driver.
        8. Keep Device Manager itself open - you'll need it again in a minute, but you can close any other Device Manager windows after you have installed the driver.
        9. Open a Command Prompt and navigate to the platform-tools folder.
        10. Run command:
          Code:
          adb devices
        11. On your Android device, you'll get an ADB prompt. Check the box to always give ADB permission and click OK.
        12. Confirm that the command results in a list of Android devices. When doing these producedures, you should only have the one device you want to work on connected, to keep things simple.
      • The second time to install the driver is while the phone is in Bootloader (fastboot mode), notFastbootD (fastbootd) mode. I know it's confusing.
        • Run command:
          Code:
          adb reboot bootloader
        • Repeat the instructions above starting with "Right-click the Android Composite ADB Interface".
          • This second time installing the drivers while in Bootloader (fastboot mode), it will show up as "Android Bootloader Interface". Thanks @simplepinoi177 for the suggestion to add this detail.
    12. Run command:
      Code:
      fastboot flashing unlock
    13. On the phone, press either the up or down volume button once until you see Unlock the bootloader |>| beside the power button.
    14. Press the power button. The phone will go black for a second and then show near the bottom Device state: unlocked.
    15. After these first-time steps to unlock the bootloader, if you want to root, continue below at the step:
    How to update each month (and also how to root) [requires an unlocked bootloader for updating via this factory image method]
    1. These three instructions only apply if you're already rooted and updating from one firmware version to another:
      • Made sure all Magisk Modules have been updated.
      • Disable all Magisk Modules.
      • UNhide Magisk!
    2. If you are going to use the Official Google Android Flash Tool, then skip the steps I indicate with FAB (Flash-All.Bat).
      • If using the Android Flash Tool to update/dirty flash, you should have the following items not selected:
        • Deselect Wipe
        • Deselect Force Flash all partitions (which will also wipe)
        • Deselect re-lock bootloader
    3. Always use the latest ADB/Fastboot (SDK Platform Tools) and Windows USB Drivers.
    4. Unzip the Platform Tools.
    5. Download the latest Pixel 7 Pro Factory Image (at the bottom of the "Cheetah" section).
    6. Unzip the factory image to the same platform-tools folder, i.e. so that flash-all.bat and all other files are in the same folder as ADB and Fastboot from the platform-tools.
    7. * FAB VERY important - Edit the flash-all.bat (on Windows) or flash-all.sh (on Linux) and remove the -w from the fastboot update image-cheetah-etcetera.zip line. This will keep the script from wiping your phone when you run it.
    8. Extract only the init_boot.img file from the image-cheetah-etcetera.zip to the same platform-tools folder.
    9. Copy the init_boot.img from the PC to the phone's internal storage.
    10. * FAB Run commands:
      Code:
      adb reboot bootloader
      flash-all.bat (on Windows)
      or
      flash-all.sh (on Linux)
      
      (Note:  At least two Apple Macintosh users had trouble using the flash-all.sh - at least one of those users, everything went smooth once they used a Windows PC for this part of the process)

      IMPORTANT - The flash-all will take several minutes and reboot on its own several times including to a mode called "FastbootD", and finally reboot into full Android when it's done. Do not interrupt this process. On the FastbootD screen on the phone, do not use any of the manual selection options - let the flash-all script do it's work. Do not unplug your phone until it has fully booted into Android.​

      Thanks to @PurppleMonkey and @xgerryx for suggesting a warning about this. Thanks to @simplepinoi177 for suggesting the "FastbootD" clarification.
    11. On the phone:
      • Wait for the phone to boot normally. Unlock the phone.
      • OPTIONAL: If you want to flash both slots, after this first time, then after do the following:

        • Code:
          adb reboot bootloader
          fastboot --set-active=other
          fastboot reboot bootloader
          flash-all.bat
        So you're doing the flash-all.bat a second time on the second slot.
      • Apply Magisk Stable to it. NOTE: It is always possible that an Android Update (Monthly, QPR [Quarterly Platform Release], new major Android versions, and Beta versions) might need a new version of Magisk Stable, Beta, or Canary from GitHub to work correctly. XDA forum for Magisk is here.
        • Launch the Magisk app.
        • Beside "Magisk", click "Install".
        • Click "Select and Patch a File", and choose the init_boot.img that you just copied to the phone's storage.
    12. Copy the Magisk'd init_boot.img (filename similar to magisk_patched-25200_1a2B3c.img)back over to the computer.
    13. Open a Command Prompt and navigate to the platform-tools folder.
    14. Run command:
      Code:
      adb reboot bootloader
    15. After phone has rebooted into Bootloader (Fastboot) mode, run command:
      Code:
      fastboot flash init_boot magisk_patched-25200_1a2B3c.img
      fastboot reboot
    16. Confirm that the phone boots completely normally.
    17. Cautiously re-enable Magisk Modules.
    18. Reboot.
    19. Confirm everything worked fine.
    20. If the phone won't boot correctly after having enabled Magisk Modules, see either of the two solutions below:
      • For the future, you don't need to go into safe mode unless that's your preference. I forgot what all it resets, but it's many settings and it's bothersome. I'd rather just reinstall my modules and not have to figure out those Android settings/changes which I come across days or weeks later when I infrequently do something. Have your phone reboot and run this:
        Code:
        adb wait-for-device shell magisk --remove-modules
        I like to just do this first:
        Code:
        adb devices
        So the server is running, then I have the long one pasted and ready to go once the phone turns off.
      • Find problem apps or Magisk Modules by rebooting to safe mode section in my next post. After following that link, you may have to scroll up a little bit and the section title will be highlighted.

    SafetyNet:

    New Universal SafetyNet Fix released by @Displax, which is a later minor revision of the test MOD version previously posted in this thread, and of the original MOD 2.0 which apparently had some typos - the latter which didn't work due to the typos but is now fixed if you download the latest one. You can get it either from XDA or on GitHub.
    1. Launch the Magisk app.
    2. Go to Magisk's Settings (Gear in top right).
      • Click Hide the Magisk app.
      • When you hide it, you'll have the optional opportunity to change the Magisk app's name to whatever you wish. It doesn't have to be complex to fool apps that check for Magisk.
      • Important: When you have the Magisk app hidden or renamed, you can accidentally install a new copy of Magisk. This situation won't work at all - neither copy of Magisk will work with two installed. This is one reason why I don't completely hide Magisk, so I can tell it's installed because I have it renamed as something easily recognizable.
      • Back to the Magisk app's Settings...
      • Click Systemless hosts. This adds a Magisk Module to Magisk, which you can verify in a later step.
      • Toggle Zygisk on.
      • Toggle Enforce DenyList on.
      • Click Configure DenyList.
        • Add every app that you want to explicitly deny root and the existence of root.
        • You can click the 3-dot menu and choose the options to display system and/or OS apps, if necessary.
        • Note that for many apps, it is not enough to click the single checkmark to the right of the app name in this list. For many but not all apps, you should click on the app name and you'll see it expand to two or more entries, each with its own toggles. In this expanded state, you can now check the single top checkbox beside the main app name and it'll toggle all individual sub-entries.
        • Some apps add new entries to this list from time to time, so if you find that an app used to work for you when rooted and doesn't now, check this list again and look for the entries that aren't fully checked. There will be an incomplete horizontal line above the apps that don't have all of their sub-entries toggled.
        • You can use the Search button at the top of this list to find specific apps quickly.
        • The most common apps you should definitely fully check in this list are:
          • IMPORTANT - There are some things, such as Google Play Services which it's fine to add to the DenyList, but it's perfectly normal when used in combination with the Universal SafetyNet Fix (USNF) that it is back to being unchecked the next time you visit the DenyList. Since USNF takes care of Google Play Services, you don't even have to add it to the DenyList in the first place.​

          • Google Play Store
          • Google Services Framework
          • Google Play Protect Service
          • Wallet
          • GPay
          • Any banking apps.
          • Any streaming apps that use DRM.
          • Any 2FA apps, especially those for work.
          • Some of those Google apps might not need denying, but it doesn't hurt to deny them.
          • Any time you toggle more entries in this list, it may be necessary to reboot the phone for it to take effect.
    3. From the main screen in the Magisk app, go to Modules at the bottom.
    4. Confirm that the Systemless hosts Magisk Module is added to this list, and enabled.
    5. Install the Magisk Module: Universal SafetyNet Fix. For now, use @Displax new Universal SafetyNet Fix, which is a later minor revision of the test MOD version previously posted in this thread, and of the original MOD 2.0 which apparently had some typos - the latter which didn't work due to the typos but is now fixed if you download the latest one. You can get it either from XDA or on GitHub.
    6. Reboot.
    7. Install from the Play Store:
      • YASNAC - SafetyNet Checker
        • Launch it.
        • Click Run SafetyNet Attestation.
        • It should say:
          • Basic integrity: Pass
          • CTS profile match: Pass
          • Evaluation type: BASIC
      • Play Integrity API Checker
        • Launch it.
        • Click Check.
        • It should have the following with a green checkmark:
          • MEETS_DEVICE_INTEGRITY
          • MEETS_BASIC_INTEGRITY
        • It's normal for MEETS_STRONG_INTEGRITY to have a red X.
      • You don't have to keep these installed, although I keep them handy.
      • Sometimes, clearing app cache and/or data for apps like the Google Play Store, GPay, Wallet and others (and then rebooting) after these steps may help pass SafetyNet as well.
    8. See @V0latyle's explanation (and further linked post) for why we can't achieve STRONG_INTEGRITY with an unlocked bootloader.

    Optional steps when updating - flashing custom kernels:
    • Download the custom kernel of choice on the phone.
      • Be sure to read the particular installation instructions in the kernel threads' OP - any instructions in their OPs takes priority over anything I say here, which is generalized.​

        For now even the AK3 Zip versions of custom kernels requires Verity and Verification to be disabled.
        How to determine if you already have Verity and Verification disabled - see section in Post #3 - Other, most important resources
      • The two schools of thought on disabling Verity and Verification:
        • My post here. If you want to discuss it any, please do so in my thread, or at least not in that custom kernel thread, so as to keep the thread on-topic.
    • Extract the vbmeta.img file from the inner Zip of the factory image zip and put it in the same folder with the latest extracted platform-tools.
    • Hook the phone up to your computer and run the following commands:

      • Code:
        adb reboot bootloader
        [wait for the phone to reboot to bootloader (fastboot mode)]
        Code:
        fastboot flash vbmeta vbmeta.img --disable-verity
        fastboot reboot
    • Unlock the phone once it's booted up.
    • Make sure the Kernel Flasher app is up to date. XDA thread for the Kernel Flasher app is here.
    • Launch Kernel Flasher.
    • Select the slot that's mounted.
    • Choose Flash AK3 Zip.
    • Select the custom kernel zip just downloaded.
    • When it's done flashing, head to Android Settings and perform a Factory Reset, as is currently needed for Despair kernel.
    • If you failed to disable Verity and Verification ahead of time, if you have to, just force the phone off using these instructions: Turn your Pixel phone on & off, then press the Volume Down and Power buttons for a couple of seconds to get into the bootloader (fastboot mode). You'll still have to factory reset after disabling Verity in combination with this kernel, for now.
    • Whenever you use the flash-all to flash your phone, as long as you want to continue to disable Verity and Verification, you'll have to further modify the flash-all script as such:

      • Code:
        fastboot update image-cheetah-buildnumber.zip --disable-verity --disable-verification

    ADB/Fastboot & Windows USB Drivers:

    Platform Tools was updated in August 2022 to v33.0.3:
    Windows: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-windows.zip
    Mac: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-darwin.zip
    Linux: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-linux.zip

    Release Notes https://developer.android.com/studio/releases/platform-tools:

    33.0.3 (Aug 2022)​

    • adb
      • Don't retry adb root if first attempt failed.
      • Fix track-devices duplicate entry.
      • Add receive windowing (increase throughput on high-latency connections).
      • More specific error messages in the "more than one device" failure cases.
      • Reject unexpected reverse forward requests.
      • Fix install-multi-package on Windows.
    • fastboot
      • Remove e2fsdroid as part of SDK platform-tools.
      • Print OemCmdHandler return message on success.
    You'll need this if you're going to unlock the bootloader on your Pixel 7 Pro: SDK Platform Tools (download links for Windows, Mac, and Linux). Note that you can find links to download the tools elsewhere, but I wouldn't trust them - you never know if they've been modified. Even if the person providing the link didn't do anything intentionally, the tools could be modified without them being aware. Why take a chance of putting your phone security further at risk?

    You can alternately use the tools from the SDK Manager, but most of us will want to stick to the basic tools-only without the complications of the full development manager.
    For Windows, get Google's drivers here Get the Google USB Driver (ADB will likely work while the phone is fully booted, but if you're like me, you'll need these drivers for after you adb reboot-bootloader, to be able to use ADB and Fastboot.
    33
    Please test this UNSF build. Should be passing basic/device integrity.

    Use updated version from main post instead
    17

    Other, most important resources


    A list of other important apps: - be sure to thank the respective OPs:
    How to unroot
    One of these two options:
    1. Official Google Android Flash Tool (OEM Unlocking needs to be toggled on - you do not have to manually unlock the bootloader - their site will do that on its own).
      Select the options to:
      • Wipe
      • Force flash all partitions
      • Re-lock bootloader
    2. Flash the completely stock init_boot.img from the same firmware version that you're on:
      Code:
      adb reboot bootloader
      fastboot flash init_boot init_boot.img

    TWRP [not made for the Pixel 7 (or 6) Pro yet - will update when or if ever it has - don't hold your breath]
    I would guess that this should be the appropriate URL for official TWRP custom recovery for the Pixel 7 Pro, but who knows when/if that will actually be made available, and it may become available unofficially in these forum sections before being made official. I'll adjust this URL as needed. https://twrp.me/google/googlepixel7pro.html.

    Factory Images (requires an unlocked bootloader)
    It's also handy to have to the full official firmware available, whether it's to recover from accidents or for actual development. Note the official link to the general Factory Images for Nexus and Pixel Devices page. The following link goes directly to the Pixel 7 Pro (Cheetah) section: Pixel 7 Pro Factory Images. I prefer to actually bookmark a link to the device listed immediately below the device I want the firmware for, because Google dumbly (in my opinion) puts the latest firmware at the bottom of the list for each particular device, and that ends up making you scroll a lot after a year or two of monthly updates.

    Full OTA Images (doesn't require an unlocked bootloader - you can ask questions in this thread, but I won't be providing the steps necessary, as I always use the factory image)

    Check warranty status - *may* reveal if a phone is refurbished, only if the phone was refurbished through Google - thanks to @Alekos for making me aware of the site.

    Official Google Pixel Update and Software Repair (reported as of January 23, 2022 to still not be updated for the Pixel 6/Pro - no idea if it has yet now, or if it will be for the 7/Pro)

    Official Google Pixel Install fingerprint calibration software (also available at the bottom of the Update and Software Repair page above) - I believe this is only helpful if you've replaced the screen - if it's anything like the Pixel 6 Pro: if you have the screen replaced, then you *must* have the fingerprint reader replaced as well.

    Find problem apps or Magisk Modules by rebooting to safe mode
    Google's Help Page for Find problem apps by rebooting to safe mode - this can be a lifesaver and keep you from having to do a restore to 100% complete stock or even from having to do a factory reset. This will deactivate all Magisk modules, and they'll remain deactivated even after you boot normally after briefly booting to safe mode. You can re-enable the Magisk modules as you wish to try to narrow down the problem if it was caused by a Magisk module. This can even get things working again after a Magisk Module wasn't finished installing and potentially causing a bootloop.
    You can also follow @Jon8RFC's advice:
    For the future, you don't need to go into safe mode unless that's your preference. I forgot what all it resets, but it's many settings and it's bothersome. I'd rather just reinstall my modules and not have to figure out those Android settings/changes which I come across days or weeks later when I infrequently do something. Have your phone reboot and run this:
    Code:
    adb wait-for-device shell magisk --remove-modules
    I like to just do this first:
    Code:
    adb devices
    So the server is running, then I have the long one pasted and ready to go once the phone turns off.

    Worked for me yesterday when I accidentally tried some old version of a Magisk Module. You have to reinstall your Magisk Modules, but if you're using a third-party widget, it won't disable them like Safe mode does.

    Official Google Android Flash Tool (OEM Unlocking needs to be toggled on - you do not have to manually unlock the bootloader - their site will do that on its own)
    OEM unlocking in developer options needs to be toggled on. I don't "believe" you have to actually do the "fastboot flashing unlock" command.

    How to determine if you already have Verity and Verification disabled (required for custom kernels for now)
    I keep seeing this asked, so I added a Magisk module for it to the linked Github release. With the module installed, you can just run:

    Code:
    su
    avbctl get-verity
    avbctl get-verification

    I spent way more time debugging that I downloaded Github's HTML of the update-binary script rather than the raw file than I care to admit. 🤦‍♂️ Off to bed.
    Alternative two more manual ways of checking:
    Since you´re probably already rooted anyway if you plan to flash this kernel, simply reboot your device. After you enter the device immediately take a kernel log with for example EXKM or any other app that allows to do that, terminal, etc.

    Look for that line
    [ 1.273480] init: [libfs_avb]AVB HASHTREE disabled on: /vendor_dlkm

    If you see this line, verity/verification should be disabled.
    I've seen several cases where having the ability to check would have been handy, so I pushed an avbctl binary built against the latest aosp sources here.

    The simplest way to use it would be the following:

    Code:
    adb push avbctl /data/local/tmp
    adb shell
    su
    cd /data/local/tmp
    chmod +x avbctl
    ./avbctl get-verity
    ./avbctl get-verification
    14
    Added Thanks to OP:
    Thank you to the following users who have all contributed greatly to my knowledge of Pixels since I came back to XDA a year ago after a few years of mostly inactivity. Apologies if I miss anybody. In alphabetical order:
    Also organized the heck out of the OP and reserved posts. I wanted to do this with my Pixel 6 Pro OP which became so much of a mess, and when I looked at the underlying BB-Code, it was even more of a mess than it seemed on the surface.