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Verizon Nexus One Officially Dead

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Scotsman828

Senior Member
May 17, 2009
180
21
Flarbear, CDMA carriers use the phones ESN (Electronic Serial Number) as your actual phone number and to identify your phone on their network. To use a new phone on a CDMA carriers network, you have to call them or go into the local retail store to have the phone's ESN put into their computers and the proper NAM codes entered into the phone. So it can work on the proper networks, local and roaming.
GSM on the other hand, your phone number is associated with your SIM Card Serial #. That is why you can simply swap the SIM Card to any GSM phone with the proper frequencies. Unless the phone is locked to a specific carrier. That's why I always buy unlocked/unbranded GSM phones. You don't get all the Bloatware from the carrier on unbranded/unsubsidized phones.
Finally there is PrePay phones, CDMA and GSM. All are locked and have proprietary software. No SIM swapping here, even a SIM from a different phone on the same network. The SIM is locked (married) to the phone it was in when activated. USELESS!
 

JJackson9995

Senior Member
Jan 13, 2010
86
0
My guess....

Google won't allow the VzW N1 to use Bing. VzW is in bed with Microsoft atm.

gg.

Just my $.02
 

RogerPodacter

Senior Member
Apr 12, 2010
5,654
425
Los Angeles, CA
its not like the incredible has been in secret production. Verizon and Google knew this whole time that the nexus and incredible were coming and the specs were known. so why now would it become an issue?
 

sweltzin

New member
Oct 26, 2007
4
0
Here is my take on it.

HTC is a neutral party in this case as either the incredible or the N1 both were built by them selling both phones on Verizon would only be a benefit to them as it is really their own two phones.

Google wants two things with the N1.
Break the current cell phone model that doesn't allow customers to select the phone first carrier second.
Push the development of Android phones

My personal guess at what happened is that Verizon continued to threaten that if Google released the N1 they would cutback the android phone lines and bring in the iPhone as their flagship phone. The incredible was a compromise

The last thing Verizon wants is to lose control over the phones on it's network. Carriers use their exclusive phones to make up for poor networks, customer service and slow speeds. Which is why we are so far behind in the wireless space.

What really has me the most upset is that Google had the backbone to stand up to China but Verizon forces them to back down??
 

binary visions

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2010
187
64

You agreeing with it, doesn't make it so.

There ARE downsides to carrying an additional device. Anyone who says otherwise is simply ignorant of the realities of managing a supply chain and a storefront.

You have to stock an additional SKU. You have to manage sales volumes - so you need people planning inventory, placing orders, making sure they stay ahead of the demand. You need a place on your shelves and literature to go along with it. You need sales staff training. I guarantee there are minimum order amounts from HTC to have them produce another phone: keep in mind, despite the fact that it's only a radio swap, it's NOT the exact same phone. All of this is before you've sold a single unit.

After you sell it, you need support people. You need spare parts. You need all the niggling little things that go into setting up and maintaining the part of the supply chain that goes back to the manufacturer to do things like repairs and refurbishments. All of this stuff costs lots of man hours for a business as large as Verizon.

They also have a choice to make: do they market the phone? That means they'll move more units, making their investment worth it. But it also means they have less money to focus on the Incredible's marketing, which means they dilute the message and move fewer overall units. If they don't market, it's less money spent, but they move fewer units and the sunk costs in the setup of the supply chain aren't mitigated as much by retail sales.

I know a lot of you look at it and say, "uh, it's just another radio - slap it in the phone and place an order" but it's not nearly that simple.
 

ChillRays

Senior Member
Apr 16, 2010
394
0
Tampa
You agreeing with it, doesn't make it so.

There ARE downsides to carrying an additional device. Anyone who says otherwise is simply ignorant of the realities of managing a supply chain and a storefront.

You have to stock an additional SKU. You have to manage sales volumes - so you need people planning inventory, placing orders, making sure they stay ahead of the demand. You need a place on your shelves and literature to go along with it. You need sales staff training. I guarantee there are minimum order amounts from HTC to have them produce another phone: keep in mind, despite the fact that it's only a radio swap, it's NOT the exact same phone. All of this is before you've sold a single unit.

After you sell it, you need support people. You need spare parts. You need all the niggling little things that go into setting up and maintaining the part of the supply chain that goes back to the manufacturer to do things like repairs and refurbishments. All of this stuff costs lots of man hours for a business as large as Verizon.

They also have a choice to make: do they market the phone? That means they'll move more units, making their investment worth it. But it also means they have less money to focus on the Incredible's marketing, which means they dilute the message and move fewer overall units. If they don't market, it's less money spent, but they move fewer units and the sunk costs in the setup of the supply chain aren't mitigated as much by retail sales.

I know a lot of you look at it and say, "uh, it's just another radio - slap it in the phone and place an order" but it's not nearly that simple.

Nice post. Yeah theres alot of behind the scenes work that goes into every decision making.
 

attn1

Inactive Recognized Developer
Mar 18, 2010
2,554
1,816
Yep. That's why the Nexus One will remain the "it" phone for a while longer yet. Verizon can keep the Incredible - as long as it's going to be branded and Android is bastardized and locked down.

Also, I read where Verizon, like AT&T, is ripping out Google Nav later this year in favor of it's own flavor of navigation software. Why? The branded versions cost more money every month. Basically, they are selling you a data plan, then vandalizing the Android software so that they can sell you a replacement for a pretty penny. I call bullshit on both AT&T and Verizon.

I thought Verizon was going to be better at Android than AT&T, but evidently they are headed down the same path.

Let's see, if you want Nav from AT&T, it's $5.00 a month. Texting is upwards of that, depending on your plan. Between Google Voice and NAV, that's probably in the neighborhood of $15.00 monthly in savings. All of a sudden, that $529.00 you have to plunk down for an unsubsidized N1 looks pretty good. Now if you want to reduce cost of ownership further, take the latest and greatest iphone with a new contract and peddle it brand new, unopened on Ebay. That ought to net you at least $300 to apply toward the N1. Since I am not under contract, that's exactly what I'm going to do the day the new iphone comes out.

If carriers want to play dirty, I don't feel bad about playing dirty right back.

Well ****. The Incredible's hardware is impressive, but it is looking to be one closed POS like every other recent HTC phone. ...... No fastboot oem unlock = ABSOLUTELY the wrong direction for Android, do not like.
 
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attn1

Inactive Recognized Developer
Mar 18, 2010
2,554
1,816
You agreeing with it, doesn't make it so.

There ARE downsides to carrying an additional device. Anyone who says otherwise is simply ignorant of the realities of managing a supply chain and a storefront.

You have to stock an additional SKU. You have to manage sales volumes - so you need people planning inventory, placing orders, making sure they stay ahead of the demand. You need a place on your shelves and literature to go along with it. You need sales staff training. I guarantee there are minimum order amounts from HTC to have them produce another phone: keep in mind, despite the fact that it's only a radio swap, it's NOT the exact same phone. All of this is before you've sold a single unit.

After you sell it, you need support people. You need spare parts. You need all the niggling little things that go into setting up and maintaining the part of the supply chain that goes back to the manufacturer to do things like repairs and refurbishments. All of this stuff costs lots of man hours for a business as large as Verizon.

They also have a choice to make: do they market the phone? That means they'll move more units, making their investment worth it. But it also means they have less money to focus on the Incredible's marketing, which means they dilute the message and move fewer overall units. If they don't market, it's less money spent, but they move fewer units and the sunk costs in the setup of the supply chain aren't mitigated as much by retail sales.

I know a lot of you look at it and say, "uh, it's just another radio - slap it in the phone and place an order" but it's not nearly that simple.

You're forgetting that Google is selling, distributing and supporting the N1 on their own in the states. Verizon would just have to activate it.

The N1 for Verizon would have probably sold more units than the sales for AT&T and T-Mobile put together. It NOT the same as the Incredible. The N1 is a DEV phone, and anyone who can do basic math will see that the N1 can cost less to own, even unsubsidized, than a locked down, stripped down version of a similar model. The Incredible might be the N1's cousin, but it's the booger-eatin' retarded cousin.

Since Google does the soft support and distribution, and the feature set is supposed to be identical to the GSM versions, adding a SKU and an additional distribution channel would not have been a huge problem. I don't believe distribution or support logistics have much to do with this decision at all.

It's political pressure. Have you noticed that things are disappearing from Market that used to be there? Things that provided free services - like easy tether - that AT&T want's to control and charge big monthly fees for? Verizon is headed down the same path, and the same reason we didn't see a subsidized N1 on AT&T is the reason we aren't seeing a Verizon N1 - they just plain don't want a phone that customers can add their own features to. They want to be able to pick every dime out of your pocket. You pay for a data plan - you should be able to use it to your best benefit. Tethering and GPS and SMS surcharges are bullshit. If they want to cap data at 5GB, fine - do that. It's more honest than what they are doing.

Don't believe me? Read this: http://products.verizonwireless.com/index.aspx?id=fnd_navigator_features

Look at this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwggXqMZZ8w

Open Androids like the N1 impact their ability to sell GPS service, SMS service and tethering. And that's why carriers don't want them.
 
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Paul22000

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2008
3,522
155
You agreeing with it, doesn't make it so.

There ARE downsides to carrying an additional device. Anyone who says otherwise is simply ignorant of the realities of managing a supply chain and a storefront.

You have to stock an additional SKU. You have to manage sales volumes - so you need people planning inventory, placing orders, making sure they stay ahead of the demand. You need a place on your shelves and literature to go along with it. You need sales staff training. I guarantee there are minimum order amounts from HTC to have them produce another phone: keep in mind, despite the fact that it's only a radio swap, it's NOT the exact same phone. All of this is before you've sold a single unit.

After you sell it, you need support people. You need spare parts. You need all the niggling little things that go into setting up and maintaining the part of the supply chain that goes back to the manufacturer to do things like repairs and refurbishments. All of this stuff costs lots of man hours for a business as large as Verizon.

They also have a choice to make: do they market the phone? That means they'll move more units, making their investment worth it. But it also means they have less money to focus on the Incredible's marketing, which means they dilute the message and move fewer overall units. If they don't market, it's less money spent, but they move fewer units and the sunk costs in the setup of the supply chain aren't mitigated as much by retail sales.

I know a lot of you look at it and say, "uh, it's just another radio - slap it in the phone and place an order" but it's not nearly that simple.

So... How much shelf space did the Nexus One take up in T-Mobile stores?

How about AT&T stores?

Have you read their "literature" in store?

How many T-Mobile and AT&T television and radio ads did you see for the Nexus One?

I think you somehow forgot the ENTIRE and HUGE point about how the Nexus One is being sold, supported, and advertised. (Hi, it's 100% Google, 0% carrier.)

Now re-read your post(s) and see how silly they look. :D
 

No I.D.

Member
Apr 24, 2010
27
0
..
the Nexus One wouldn't be filled with the Verizon bloatware that the Incredible most likely will be.

Bloatware? Are you referring to ALL the bloatware VZW preinstalled on both the Droid and Eris? Oh wait... there wasn't any.

Try again.


Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk
 

uansari1

Senior Member
Jul 27, 2008
3,549
92
Karachi
So when the Sprint Nexus One comes out..couldn't one just buy that and activate it on Verizon? Assuming Verizon doesn't lock it out?
 

attn1

Inactive Recognized Developer
Mar 18, 2010
2,554
1,816
Bloatware? Are you referring to ALL the bloatware VZW preinstalled on both the Droid and Eris? Oh wait... there wasn't any.

Try again.


Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk

Bloatware like Verizon Navigator, coming soon to a Verizon 'Droid near you.
 

Paul22000

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2008
3,522
155
Also, I read where Verizon, like AT&T, is ripping out Google Nav later this year in favor of it's own flavor of navigation software. Why? The branded versions cost more money every month. Basically, they are selling you a data plan, then vandalizing the Android software so that they can sell you a replacement for a pretty penny. I call bullshit on both AT&T and Verizon.

I think you meant Motorola?

http://www.engadget.com/2010/04/26/motorola-gives-google-the-boot-turns-to-skyhook-for-location-se/
 

attn1

Inactive Recognized Developer
Mar 18, 2010
2,554
1,816

Nope, didn't see that one. I meant Verizon's Navigator. There has been a lot of speculation for some time that when the Android version of that is ready, Verizon will begin plucking competitive GPS software out. Maybe Moto's will work with Verizon's "service", but if not I think that if Verizon isn't getting something out of the GPS service, it's not going into handsets they sell.

Edit: just read up on Motos skyhook plans - not so sure it's not a replacement for Google Nav - it's just looks like an additional location engine (based on wifi hotspots) to work with whatever NAV software is installed.

Verizon Navigator is $10.00 a month, and that's revenue I don't see them giving up if they can continue to extort it.
 
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Paul22000

Senior Member
Jan 19, 2008
3,522
155
Nope, didn't see that one. I meant Verizon's Navigator. There has been a lot of speculation for some time that when the Android version of that is ready, Verizon will begin plucking competitive GPS software out. Maybe Moto's will work with Verizon's "service", but if not I think that if Verizon isn't getting something out of the GPS service, it's not going into handsets they sell.

Edit: just read up on Motos skyhook plans - not so sure it's not a replacement for Google Nav - it's just looks like an additional location engine to work with whatever NAV software is installed.

Yeah I know it's an "addition" but I thought that's what you meant.

Can you link where you read about Verizon replacing Google Nav later this year? I've never heard anything even quasi-official about this.
 

attn1

Inactive Recognized Developer
Mar 18, 2010
2,554
1,816
Yeah I know it's an "addition" but I thought that's what you meant.

Can you link where you read about Verizon replacing Google Nav later this year? I've never heard anything even quasi-official about this.

Nothing too official, just some stuff I read a while back when the Android version clearly wasn't ready for prime time. I'll see if I can some stuff and post back.

Edit: Here's a recent post about the new VZ Navigator being bundled/branded with newer non-Android smartphones. Want to bet that it makes it way onto VZ Androids once it's ready? http://news.vzw.com/news/2010/02/pr2010-02-01.html

Past tactics: http://www.phonenews.com/verizon-cl...st-makes-everyone-work-with-verizonveri-4277/

just google "verizon block GPS" and you'll see underhanded crap everywhere. Google maps wasn't such a big deal while Android represented a small market, but now that Androids are outselling iphones, it's not so small anymore, and carriers are going to protect their add ons.

Google has also said that MMS is going to be added to SMS in Google Voice. That's going to ruffle some feathers, too. There is a war going on between carriers and Google over all of this stuff.

As smartphones become a larger percentage of a cell phone market that's pretty well saturated with subscribers, features are where carriers plan to increase their revenues.
 
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krabman

Senior Member
Sep 22, 2008
2,987
928
Now its official from google itself, cut and paste.... We won't be selling a Nexus One with Verizon, and this is a reflection of the amazing innovation happening across the open Android ecosystem. Verizon Wireless customers who want an Android phone with the power of the Nexus One can get the Droid Incredible by HTC.
 

attn1

Inactive Recognized Developer
Mar 18, 2010
2,554
1,816
Now its official from google itself, cut and paste.... We won't be selling a Nexus One with Verizon, and this is a reflection of the amazing innovation happening across the open Android ecosystem. Verizon Wireless customers who want an Android phone with the power of the Nexus One can get the Droid Incredible by HTC.

Where did you find that, in a Google forum?