Question Verizon Pixel 6 Pro Bootloader Unlock?

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roirraW "edor" ehT

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There is always a trick or hack to do this. Even the pixel has yet to be hacked since pixel 2 or 3.
That's not what's being talked about. Verizon keeps the bootloader from being unlocked on all their phones to the best of their ability.

There are also usually permanent repercussions of hacks, on some brands other than Google.
 
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craznazn

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There is always a trick or hack to do this. Even the pixel has yet to be hacked since pixel 2 or 3.
Utilizing a vulnerability to unlock a BL is kinda completely different than a company's policy allowing you to unlock the BL. You wouldn't say iPhone 1-12 are easily jailbroken, even though you could totally do so <ios 14.2, but to get there, people had to find and leverage exploits.

VZW goes out of their way to prevent their devices from being BL unlocked.
 

The.Jericho.Initiative

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Jan 3, 2009
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No, I've been rooting/modding phones since eclair and used to be an XDA News writer, I definitely understand the difference between sim and bootloader unlocking. Once the phone is sim unlocked, the "OEM UNLOCK" option should no longer be greyed out in the developer options. Once that setting becomes available after sim unlock, there shouldn't be anything in the way of unlocking the bootloader. The only thing that could be an issue is if the manufacturer then required a token to unlock the bootloader, but I'm gonna go with Google isn't requiring that. Now, this is all based on my own knowledge and experience, if anyone has more insight to either back me up or shoot me down, please, this is the whole reason we're here in these threads, to gain knowledge and information. If Verizon is so informal about sim unlocking their phones after 60 days, it really doesn't make sense for them to enforce bootloader locking at that point. I mean, what is the point once they cut you loose with your sim card? Check this out, I had this ****ty Nord 10 5G from Metro and a guy figured out which apps to remove via ADB to carrier unlock the phone, hence making the OEM UNLOCK choice available in developer settings. What I'm saying is sometimes things aren't as locked down as you think, I mean, Metro is pretty strict on carrier locking their phones and really don't like doing it after you've met all the requirements. So if it's as easy as getting rid of a few apps via sneaking through ADB, it's gotta be that way for all the phones it's not like they're running different software (other than version level) they're all Android. Maybe this information will inspire someone on here that knows way more than me to figure out how to unlock a Verizon locked bootloader. If I'm correct, they really don't have that power to lock the bootloader, only to take away our option to do so by "sim/carrier" locking the phone which the software is told to take away our ability to choose that option. Please, anyone, I honestly would like to know if I'm wrong, but don't just say I'm wrong, explain to me and the rest of us. Thanks guys and girls!!!

LOL.

If that were the case, VZW rooting would have been much more of a thing for a decade now... The best part of the situation is that no argument is necessary. The topic has been discussed, for nearly ten straight years, on these forums. If you're genuinely curious and of the pedigree you claim, then I recommend you spend an hour searching and you will find the answers you seek.

I'm not going to say you're wrong, I think you already know you are, I'm simply saying that if you actually want an answer - you know how to find it.
 

FernBch

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Sep 14, 2009
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Well, I'm going to dive in again. I unlocked my VZW Pixel 1, the Pixel 2's were vulnerable, and I got close on the P3XL. Actually bricked it with an exploit hack attempt. Someone did manage to unlock the P3XL bootloader but how was never shared. There is a thread on it.

Got my P6Pro yesterday and have not updated it, so I'll be looking into exploits to pop a root shell with. I'm familiar with how the BL unlock process works, just need to find the way to defeat/bypass/fool it.

Wish me luck.....
 

roirraW "edor" ehT

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Well, I'm going to dive in again. I unlocked my VZW Pixel 1, the Pixel 2's were vulnerable, and I got close on the P3XL. Actually bricked it with an exploit hack attempt. Someone did manage to unlock the P3XL bootloader but how was never shared. There is a thread on it.

Got my P6Pro yesterday and have not updated it, so I'll be looking into exploits to pop a root shell with. I'm familiar with how the BL unlock process works, just need to find the way to defeat/bypass/fool it.

Wish me luck.....
I definitely wish you luck. It's my favorite thing to be able to do things that someone intended us to not be able to do with technology.
 
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Morgrain

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Aug 4, 2015
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Well, I'm going to dive in again. I unlocked my VZW Pixel 1, the Pixel 2's were vulnerable, and I got close on the P3XL. Actually bricked it with an exploit hack attempt. Someone did manage to unlock the P3XL bootloader but how was never shared. There is a thread on it.

Got my P6Pro yesterday and have not updated it, so I'll be looking into exploits to pop a root shell with. I'm familiar with how the BL unlock process works, just need to find the way to defeat/bypass/fool it.

Wish me luck.....
I wish you luck. It's high time that people managed to get some freedom - these locked bootloaders are a pest, and it's not even properly communicated. We had so many Verizon customers here on XDA over the years that were surprised by this situation and wouldn't have bought a Verizon phone, if they would have known of the locked bootloader.
 
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HipKat

Recognized Contributor
Well, I'm going to dive in again. I unlocked my VZW Pixel 1, the Pixel 2's were vulnerable, and I got close on the P3XL. Actually bricked it with an exploit hack attempt. Someone did manage to unlock the P3XL bootloader but how was never shared. There is a thread on it.

Got my P6Pro yesterday and have not updated it, so I'll be looking into exploits to pop a root shell with. I'm familiar with how the BL unlock process works, just need to find the way to defeat/bypass/fool it.

Wish me luck.....
Yeah, good luck. I have to tell you, I've seen people make these same type of posts on here for years, ever since the Nexus 6, which was the last great phone for Mod'g that I owned. Still haven't seen anyone make it happen though
 

HipKat

Recognized Contributor
I wish you luck. It's high time that people managed to get some freedom - these locked bootloaders are a pest, and it's not even properly communicated. We had so many Verizon customers here on XDA over the years that were surprised by this situation and wouldn't have bought a Verizon phone, if they would have known of the locked bootloader.
I still always go back to the AZ Supreme Court decision that the end-user is ultimately responsible for a device that they own and voiding the warranty is their choice. Unfortunately, since Search Engines have become almost unusable anymore, I can't find the actual ruling
 
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roirraW "edor" ehT

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I wish you luck. It's high time that people managed to get some freedom - these locked bootloaders are a pest, and it's not even properly communicated. We had so many Verizon customers here on XDA over the years that were surprised by this situation and wouldn't have bought a Verizon phone, if they would have known of the locked bootloader.
Me too - I didn't realize about Verizon's practice until I was on my second Verizon Android phone, the VS985 LG G3, and VK810 LG 8.3 tablet. It certainly explained things about why I had to root my HTC Droid Eris (and LG devices) the ways I had to - of course with the Eris, that was still relatively early days of Android. Developers had so much success working around the limitations for several years, that I was an oblivious user.
 
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V0latyle

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However, under the Magnuson-Moss Act of 1975, manufacturers likely cannot void your hardware warranty for modifying the software (e.g. unlocking the bootloader) unless they can prove that the modifications led directly to the hardware malfunction.
Yes...But also no.

You'll find that many manufacturers of many different products will not honor warranty if any modifications have been done. I've had to replace 3 water pumps and 2 engine speed sensors on my VW GTI, and I paid out of pocket every time. I have a cold air intake, a tune, and a turbo-back exhaust, but the engine is otherwise stock, and there is no possible way any of my modifications could possibly cause those failures.

Sure, you could potentially take them to court, but they have much more money, and attorneys on permanent retainer who will happily waste your time, so you'd most likely run out of money before your case got anywhere useful.

One guy I know had his warranty denied for a sunroof malfunction simply because he had a lowered suspension.

So in essence, even though the law may be on your side, and you would think the burden of proof would be on the manufacturer to prove that your modifications caused the failure, you'll often find that it's the other way around - you have to prove that your modifications didn't cause the failure. We are more or less at the OEM's mercy. Google has typically been pretty good about not voiding warranties on bootloader unlocked devices; I don't believe Samsung is quite as generous.
 

roirraW "edor" ehT

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Yes...But also no.

You'll find that many manufacturers of many different products will not honor warranty if any modifications have been done. I've had to replace 3 water pumps and 2 engine speed sensors on my VW GTI, and I paid out of pocket every time. I have a cold air intake, a tune, and a turbo-back exhaust, but the engine is otherwise stock, and there is no possible way any of my modifications could possibly cause those failures.

Sure, you could potentially take them to court, but they have much more money, and attorneys on permanent retainer who will happily waste your time, so you'd most likely run out of money before your case got anywhere useful.

One guy I know had his warranty denied for a sunroof malfunction simply because he had a lowered suspension.

So in essence, even though the law may be on your side, and you would think the burden of proof would be on the manufacturer to prove that your modifications caused the failure, you'll often find that it's the other way around - you have to prove that your modifications didn't cause the failure. We are more or less at the OEM's mercy. Google has typically been pretty good about not voiding warranties on bootloader unlocked devices; I don't believe Samsung is quite as generous.
It's the sad truth, but I believe you are fully correct. Thanks for reminding me! 😜😂 Now I can start my weekend angry and depressed. LOL!
 

Lughnasadh

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Mar 23, 2015
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Yes...But also no.

You'll find that many manufacturers of many different products will not honor warranty if any modifications have been done. I've had to replace 3 water pumps and 2 engine speed sensors on my VW GTI, and I paid out of pocket every time. I have a cold air intake, a tune, and a turbo-back exhaust, but the engine is otherwise stock, and there is no possible way any of my modifications could possibly cause those failures.

Sure, you could potentially take them to court, but they have much more money, and attorneys on permanent retainer who will happily waste your time, so you'd most likely run out of money before your case got anywhere useful.

One guy I know had his warranty denied for a sunroof malfunction simply because he had a lowered suspension.

So in essence, even though the law may be on your side, and you would think the burden of proof would be on the manufacturer to prove that your modifications caused the failure, you'll often find that it's the other way around - you have to prove that your modifications didn't cause the failure. We are more or less at the OEM's mercy. Google has typically been pretty good about not voiding warranties on bootloader unlocked devices; I don't believe Samsung is quite as generous.
In the area of cell phones, the burden of proof lies with the manufacturer to prove that the software modification did indeed directly cause the hardware malfunction.

As another example, when using aftermarket car parts, the burden of proof is again on the manufacturer to prove that the aftermarket parts contributed to the failure.

It is illegal to not honor warranties in cases like this.

On what party the burden of proof lies depends on a number of factors, including the type of case, jurisdiction, the laws involved (including Federal Rules), if affirmative defenses are pleaded, the type of warranty, etc... But in the scenario I was specifically referring to, the burden of proof does indeed lie with the manufacturer.

And let's remember, just because a manufacturer will not honor a warranty or says that your warranty is void does not necessarily mean that it is. Companies say things all the time to try to dissuade people from suing. For example, you go into a valet parking lot and there is a sign that says "Not responsible for stolen items or damage to car.". Well, they can say this but that doesn't make it true. In a bailment situation such as this they have a duty to take reasonable steps to care for your car. And if they don't and items are stolen from your car or your car is damaged, they are indeed responsible, regardless of what they say or what signs they have up.

But you are correct in that the average person may not have the resources to actually go to court against a big company. But the point of my original comment was not whether it was feasible to take legal action, but rather that it is illegal to deny a warranty based on the scenario described (i.e. unlocking the bootloader).
 
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V0latyle

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It's the sad truth, but I believe you are fully correct. Thanks for reminding me! 😜😂 Now I can start my weekend angry and depressed. LOL!
Way ahead of you, I started my Friday by getting my tax information together. Once again, maximum withholding resulted in somehow underpaying our taxes.

In the area of cell phones, the burden of proof lies with the manufacturer to prove that the software modification did indeed directly cause the hardware malfunction.

As another example, when using aftermarket car parts, the burden of proof is again on the manufacturer to prove that the aftermarket parts contributed to the failure.
It doesn't matter what industry we are talking about - from a legal perspective, the burden of proof indeed lies with the manufacturer to prove that any modification caused the failure.
It is illegal to not honor warranties in cases like this.
Yes - but do you have the time and money to fight a multi-billion dollar corporation in court? The case would likely take years, and you'd run out of money LONG before they do. In the end it would have just been cheaper for them to repair your device, but when they simply say "no", they're counting on you not having the time, energy, and resources to actually take them to court over it.
On what party the burden of proof lies depends on a number of factors, including the type of case, jurisdiction, the laws involved (including Federal Rules), if affirmative defenses are pleaded, the type of warranty, etc... But in the scenario I was specifically referring to, the burden of proof does indeed lie with the manufacturer.

And let's remember, just because a manufacturer will not honor a warranty or says that your warranty is void does not necessarily mean that it is. Companies say things all the time to try to dissuade people from suing. For example, you go into a valet parking lot and there is a sign that says "Not responsible for stolen items or damage to car.". Well, they can say this but that doesn't make it true. In a bailment situation such as this they have a duty to take reasonable steps to care for your car. And if they don't and items are stolen from your car or your car is damaged, they are indeed responsible, regardless of what they say or what signs they have up.

But you are correct in that the average person may not have the resources to actually go to court against a big company. But the point of my original comment was not whether it was feasible to take legal action, but rather that it is illegal to deny a warranty based on the scenario described (i.e. unlocking the bootloader).
Exactly. Like I said, they have an army of attorneys dedicated to this particular purpose, who will do everything in their legal power to make your life hell. They know that you'd probably win a judgement, so they'll do everything they can to prevent you from getting there. Death by a thousand cuts, as they say.
 
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Lughnasadh

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It doesn't matter what industry we are talking about - from a legal perspective, the burden of proof indeed lies with the manufacturer to prove that any modification caused the failure.
Not necessarily. Depends on if it falls under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act. Or if it falls under any other federal law where Federal Rules would apply. Or if the FTC has granted the manufacturer or seller a waiver. And if state law applies, depends on the state.

And it depends on the type of warranty and for what purposes the product is sold. The Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act does not cover oral warranties or products sold for resale or commercial purposes.

There are almost always exceptions to the general rules. That's why in law school there is often as much emphasis put on the exceptions to the rules as there are to the rules themselves.

Yes - but do you have the time and money to fight a multi-billion dollar corporation in court? The case would likely take years, and you'd run out of money LONG before they do. In the end it would have just been cheaper for them to repair your device, but when they simply say "no", they're counting on you not having the time, energy, and resources to actually take them to court over it.
But again, my point was not whether it would be feasible, but only if it was legal to void the warranty when unlocking the bootloader. And if indeed the case falls under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975, there is a fee shifting provision in there that requires the manufacturer to pay for reasonable attorneys' fees if they lose.
 
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V0latyle

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The fact that people still believe you can't unlocked the bootloader on any Verizon pixel, is your first sign there are no quality developers on this forum anymore.

It's straightforward.

Sim unlock your phone and boom.
It's not that simple. If it was, unlocking Verizon variant bootloaders would be easy.
 

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  • 2
    I was wrong, I get it. I haven't used a pixel since the XL so my memory was just foggy on it. I just got a 6 pro and haven't had a chance to do anything with it but since now I know I can pop my vzw sim in and not have my phone gimped I'm good.

    That's why I stopped posting
    2
    😂

    If you had have actually read the link, it works for 6 Pro & even works on Samsung devices, etc, it was just originally compiled and created for the Pixel 6 - just add -f to the batch file.
    😂😂😂💀💀💀 Well I guess I need to go back to school and learn how to read again. I was interpreting a different way. What a dumbass I am lol
    2
    I got my P6pro from US, but was Verizon version, I put UAE sim, I am now on A13 beta 2..
    Now I want my Pixel 6 Pro Bootloader to be unlocked but OEM unlocking in developer options is greyed out.

    Any advice?
    You cannot and will not ever be able to unlock the bootloader of any Verizon device.

    Sorry, mate.

    You can unenroll from the Beta but it will wipe your device since it would technically be a "downgrade" to Android 12.1.
  • 9
    The fact that people still believe you can't unlocked the bootloader on any Verizon pixel, is your first sign there are no quality developers on this forum anymore.

    It's straightforward.

    Sim unlock your phone and boom.

    Or, continue to trust the below-average folks on these forums.

    Yet, here I am doing the same unlock method again, with the same result. This speaks volumes to how good the supposed developers are on XDA.


    Your insults directed at developers, and other members on Xda violate Forum Rules and are no longer welcome in the forums.


    Please make sure you fully understand the following:

    1) if you have a proven method to unlock the bootloader on VZW devices, open a thread, make yourself famous, and become the greatest Xda developer ever. If you can't or won't open your own thread and share your method, stop posting your self -righteous comments allover the forums.

    2) if you post any further insults directed at Xda members, your account will be restricted. Xda is about sharing and developing, not smoke & mirrors and insulting other members who have actually produced tons of legit development.

    No more warnings on this, check your PM.

    Thanks for your cooperation.
    8
    No, I've been rooting/modding phones since eclair and used to be an XDA News writer, I definitely understand the difference between sim and bootloader unlocking. Once the phone is sim unlocked, the "OEM UNLOCK" option should no longer be greyed out in the developer options. Once that setting becomes available after sim unlock, there shouldn't be anything in the way of unlocking the bootloader. The only thing that could be an issue is if the manufacturer then required a token to unlock the bootloader, but I'm gonna go with Google isn't requiring that. Now, this is all based on my own knowledge and experience, if anyone has more insight to either back me up or shoot me down, please, this is the whole reason we're here in these threads, to gain knowledge and information.
    If Verizon is so informal about sim unlocking their phones after 60 days, it really doesn't make sense for them to enforce bootloader locking at that point.
    I mean, what is the point once they cut you loose with your sim card? Check this out, I had this ****ty Nord 10 5G from Metro and a guy figured out which apps to remove via ADB to carrier unlock the phone, hence making the OEM UNLOCK choice available in developer settings. What I'm saying is sometimes things aren't as locked down as you think, I mean, Metro is pretty strict on carrier locking their phones and really don't like doing it after you've met all the requirements. So if it's as easy as getting rid of a few apps via sneaking through ADB, it's gotta be that way for all the phones it's not like they're running different software (other than version level) they're all Android. Maybe this information will inspire someone on here that knows way more than me to figure out how to unlock a Verizon locked bootloader. If I'm correct, they really don't have that power to lock the bootloader, only to take away our option to do so by "sim/carrier" locking the phone which the software is told to take away our ability to choose that option. Please, anyone, I honestly would like to know if I'm wrong, but don't just say I'm wrong, explain to me and the rest of us. Thanks guys and girls!!!
    I seriously doubt the "60 day sim unlock" allows the bootloader to be unlocked, otherwise we'd have a ton of VZW variant threads filled with development, and devices that are 61 days old, rooted, and running custom Roms.

    But we don't. We don't have even have any developers working on VZW devices, regardless of age. So deductively thinking, the "60 day sim unlock" doesn't sound like it's currently an option.

    Just my .02 (USD) worth 😁
    7
    Why are we doing this dance yet again? It's pointless and counterproductive.
    Thank you.
    This same exact thread happened in the Pixel 5 forum.

    He won't provide proof.
    And he doesn't have to... It's that simple.
    Just ignore, please.
    6
    It's not necessarily true, according to Verizon, they Sim unlock their phones after 60 days. Once that is done, we should be able to to check oem unlocking option in developers options and unlock the bootloader. Am I missing something?
    Incorrect. SIM unlocking is not necessarily related to bootloader unlocking. While T-Mobile (and I think AT&T) users on here have found and reported that when they achieve SIM unlocking on their variants, that they can then bootloader unlock as well, Verizon has for a very, very long time enforced bootloader lock with all their will.

    The only exceptions that I've ever heard of were not by choice of Verizon, but by hacks/vulnerabilities. Such as the VS985 LG G3, there was an exploit that didn't actually bootloader unlock, but more made it so that the locked bootloader didn't really matter. On the Pixel 1, if you had the Verizon variant and were still on Android 7.10 or below, you could unlock the bootloader, but once the 7.11 OTA came out, if you hadn't already unlocked the bootloader (or at least toggled the toggle), then you were locked in until a foreign national found a hacking way to get in, but they charge for it. All this while Verizon phones have been ultimately SIM unlocked for similarly a very long time.
    6
    It's not necessarily true, according to Verizon, they Sim unlock their phones after 60 days. Once that is done, we should be able to to check oem unlocking option in developers options and unlock the bootloader. Am I missing something?
    You might be thinking 'carrier unlocked' vs "bootloader unlocked".

    VZW does NOT like people rooting their devices so they have locked the bootloaders for several years now. I honestly don't even think any devs are working on a workaround/bypass for VZW devices anymore because they've had a long history of tightly locking down their device's bootloaders.